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February 27, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
SNOW FLURRIES AND
COLDER

1
r Mfrl i~gan

Iatg

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NiGIT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 101. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1917. PRICE FIVE CENI

r _

FIRE IN MICHIGAN
UNION DOES 1 05000
DOLLARS DAMAgGE
FLAMES AT 2 O'CLOCK MONDAY
MORNING DESTROY
DANCE HALL
FIRE DEPARTMENT
DELAYED BY BLUNDER

Hope to Finish Repairs by First
April; Building and Con-
tents Insured

of

Gaining headway while a night
watchman watched, a freshman blund-
ered, and the fire department waited,
a blaze in the Michigan Union- early
yesterday morning destroyed property
to the value of nearly $10,000.
The fire was noticed at about 2
o'clock Monday morning by. night
watchman, Charles Walters, of the
Hauser, Owens & Ames company. "I
was firing up when I ffoted sparks
coming from the Union chimney," ex-
plained Walters, "and I thought that
the chimney was burning out. Sev-
eral minutes later I looked again and
saw the flames leaping from the roof.
I ran over, and seeing a freshman
passing on the board walk I called to
him to call the fire department to the
Union."
The fire alarm was sent in for the
"corner of State and Williams" instead
of "Jefferson and State," and the fire
engine made the run to the former
place and remained there until the
chief went down State street and dis-
covered the source of the fire.
Interior Furnishings Destroyed
In a desperate, but short fight, the
flames were controlled before they
had gained headway to the south end
of the Union. The fire, burning
through a hole in the dance floor 20
feet across, charred the rafters and
beams to such an extent that they
will probably have to be replaced.
Smoke and water utterly destroyed
the interior decorations, including the
piano, 18 Union opera posters, sou-
venirs of former plays, and the large
elk's head recently presented to the
Union.
The entire maple flooring started to
rib after being watersoaked and will
have to 'be taken up. The canvas cov-
ering on the floor protected the din-
ing rooms below, which escaped with-
out much damage.
Awaken Sleeping Steward
Sometime after the department had
arrived Denny Donovan, Union stew-
ard, who was sleeping on the floor
above the offices, was awakened by
someone throwing gravel against his
window. Denny hurriedly wakened
four other employees, warning them to
stay within their rooms until the fire-
men could place ladders, as the hall-
ways were impassable with smoke.
On re-entering his room, Denny was
overcome by the smoke which had
swept through the door. Recovering,
he crawled along the floor and threw
his clothes out of the window, going
down a ladder wlich a fireman had
brought. Together with the Misses
Marion McRobert and Beatrice An-
derson, Maurice McAuliffe, and John
VanRiper, Donovan retired to the Zeta
Psi house.
Fire Starts in Furnace Rom
The fire started in the furnace room
at the north end of the building. It
was not due to an over-heated fur-
nace, only a light fire being kept in
the building all day on account of the
mild weather, and the furnace was
cold when banked for the night.
In an interview Homer Heath, '07,
secretary and manager of the Union,
said late yesterday afternoon, "We
shall repair and redecorate the Michi-
gan Union where it was damaged by
fire and water and attempt to have
the hall and cafe ready for dances and
dinners by the first of April."
Workmen and plumbers were en-
gaged yesterday in clearing up the
rubbish and getting the basement in
shape preparatory to beginning the
actual repairing. A fire was lighted
in the furnace in order to dry out the
building.-
The reading room and store of the

club will remain open to members as
formerly. ="
Building and contents were covered

Track Hen to be
Given Send-off
Michigan's, Entry in the Champaign
Meet Arouses Student Interest
and Enthusiasm
All eyes are turned in expectation
toward the result of the entry of the
Michigan track team in the intercol-
legiate meet with western colleges this
week at Champaign, 111. The occasion
will not be without due celebration.
A royal send-off is to be given the
track team when it leaves the Michi-
gan Central depot Thursday night.
he band will be there in old time
style. Cheer leaders will be on hand
to draw out the spirit, to give the
squad a rousing farewell.
The feeling of rivalry is swelling
up in the hiearts of-all Michigan men.
A number of rooters are preparing to
follow the team and see the Maize and
Blue stack up against their western
rivals,including Minnesota, Wisconsin,
and Chicago.
The rooters will probably leave Fri-
day night.
CONTESTANTS CHOSEN
WINNER OF CONTEST TO SPEAK
IN MINNEAPOLIS NEXT
MAY
Five contestants have been chosen
to compete in the annual Northern
-ratorical league contest to be held
n University hall Friday, March 2, in
ompetition for the Chicago Alumni
association medal and the two testi-
nonials of $200 and $50.
R. M. Carson and I. S. Toplon are
the representatives of the senior class
ind Lois May and Ferne Layton will
)e the contestants from the Junior
-lass. W. P. Sanford was the repre-
sentative chosen from the sophomore
-lass, but it is likely that because of
illness he will be unable to compete.
In that event, D. R. Hertz will be the
sophomore contestant. The order of
speaking will be decided by lot. '
The winner of the University con-
test will speak in Minneapolis some'
time in May in competition for the
Frank O. Lowden prize of $100 given
to the winner of the northern ora-
torical contest in which seven univer-:
sities are annually entered.
The contest this year will be en-
tirely free to the students and public
and no ticket will be required.
President Hutchings Goes to Rochester
President Harry B. Hutchins will
leave for Rochester, N. Y., today to at-
tend the annual meegng and banquet
of the Rochester District Alumni as-
sociation of the University of Michi-
gan, to be held in that city Wednesday
evening, Feb. 21.
The meeting will be held in the
Genesee Valley club of Rochester. The1
president will return to Ann Arbor
Friday.
W. R. MELTON TO
LECTURE TONIGHT
Address to Deal With Advertising in
Relation to Business Or-
ganization
William R. Melton, advertising ma-
ager of the Burroughs Adding Machine

company of Detroit will speak to stu-
dents of business administration and
advertising in room 162 of the natural
science building tonight at 7:30
o'clock.
His address will deal principally
with the part played by the advertising
department in the modern business or-
ganization, but he will also discuss
the sales department and sales pro-
motion work. The meeting is under
the auspices of the Tryads and is open
to all.
Senior Engineers Postpone Rance9
Announcement was made yesterday
by the committee in charge of the
senior engineers dance, which was to
have been held on Friday, March 2, at
the Union, that other arrangements
for the place of the dance will be madel
today and made known in tomorrow's
Daily. The committee expects to se-{
cure Barbour gymnasium. for the af-
fair.

u uun a i IuIfu
SHIP OF 1S,099 TONS TORPEDOED
ACCORDING TO QUEENS-
TOWN WIRE
ONLY ONE LIFE BOAT;
27 AMERICANS ABOARD
5,000 Sacks of Mail Lost; 278 Survivors
Expected to Land Last
Night
London, Feb. 26.-The big Cunard
liner, Laconia, 18,099 tons, the biggest
prize of the U-boat war, was tor-
pedoed and sunk without warning off
the Irish coast Sunday night, Consul
Frost at Queenstown reported this
afternoon.
Two hundred and seventy-eight sur-
vivors will be landed tonight at
Queenstown and Bantry island. Fif-
teen survivors already have been put
ashore. They brought reports that
some of the survivors were injured.
The Laconia carried six American pas-
sengers and 21 Americans in her crew.
Valuable Securities on Board
New York, Feb. 26.-A cable mes-
sage to the Cunard line this afternoon
told of the sinking of the Laconia, and
said one live was lost. There were 33
first cabin passengers, 42 second class
passengers, and a crew of 216 aboard
tlRe Laconia. according to a statement
issued at the Cunard offices here.
The Laconia had aboard 5,000 sacks
of mail, uf which 1,300 had been re-
moved from the American liner St.
Louis. The bags contained securities
worth several million dollars. The
reason for the unusual number of
Americans in the crew was that a
strike occurred the day the ship was
to sail. Twenty-five of the crew left
the ship, refusing to risk the subma-
rine zone dangers. The ship officers
got Americans to fill their places.
Get Official Report
Washington, Feb. 26.-The state de-
partment received official word of the
sinking of the giant Cunarder, La-
conia, in a cable from Consul Frost
at Queenstown this afternoon. Frost's
message read: "Cunarder Laconia tor-
pedoed--sunk Feb. 25, 150 miles west
of Fastnet. Details not yet known;
278 survivors will land here today. It
is known some are missing. One is
dead."
ASSOCIATION OPENS
OFFICE IN ST. PAUL
Body That Overturned North Dakot
Politics Moves Offices from
Fargo
St. Paul, Feb. 26.-National head-
quarters for the Farmers' Non-par-
tisan league were opened in St. Paul
today.
This is the organization that recent-
ly swept North Dakota's old line poli-
ticians from control and took over the
legislature to enact legislation favor-
able to farmers.
Bettering of marketing conditions,
and entire elimination of speculative
marketing of foodstuffs, and of manip-
ulation in food, through state owned
terminal elevators and warehouses,
was the only platform of the farmer
r ganization.
" Removal of the league headquarters
from Fargo to St. Paul today is the
signal for the nationalization of the
movement, A. C. Townley, president of
the league said. Similar organizations
in Minnesota, South Dakota, and Mon-
tana are now being formed.
In the three charter member states
of the league, marketing of what by
means other than through the Minne-
apolis chamber of commerce and Chi-

cago board of trade, are planned.
That the corn marketing conditions
of Illinois, Iowa, and Indiana, and the
fruit marketing conditions of the Far
West, along with the cotton market-
ing conditions of the South, would be
helped by the political sweep of the
league, is the claim of its promoters.
Dudley Speaks to Senior Engineers
Mr. A. M. Dudley of the Westing-
house Electrical Manufacturing com-
pany of Pittsburg will be the speaker
at the senior engineers' assembly
which will be held Thursday morning
at 10 o'clock. .

Although the Union dance hall has
been gutted by fire and water, it will
not detersthe senior lits from holding
their first party of the semester on
next Friday eve'ning. The reason-be-
cause the dance is to be held at the
Armory.
theFisher's orchestra will be there
to furnish the necessary music for the
d&h oing which will begin at 9 o'clock
and continue until 1 o'clock.
Tickets are $1.00 each and may be
obtained from Chairman H. A. Fitz-
gerald, John Codd, or at the Busy Bee
STEWART IS GIVEN N
ENGINEERING JOB
V. o Graduate to Succeed A. H. Krom
as Director of American
Association
Paul P. Stewart, chief engineer of
the Kettler-Elliot Erection company
of Chicago, has been appointed na-
tional director of the American As-
sociation of Engineers to fill the un-
expired term of A. H. Krom, who re-
signed to become general manager of
the association.
Mr. Stewart is a graduate of Yale in
class of 1902. He has been con-
nected with the United States Steel
corporation, where he had charge of
the designing department. He also
had charge of the construction work
at Cary. He is known in Chicago as
an engineer of exceptional ability, and
he will undoubtedly be a great help in
.urthering the work of the association.
MAY REGISTER FOR
CLASSES TONIGHT
Ins:ietors for Red Cross Sections to
Be Announced at
Meeting
Those who have not registered in
the Red Cross classes may do so at
the mass meeting to be held at 8
o'clock tonight in room B law build-
ing. This meeting is for the purpose
of announcing the instructors and ar-
ranging the time of meeting for the
various groups.
The classes given consist in one in
first aid methods, and one in simple
hygiene and home nursing. They are
primarily for women and are given un-
der the auspices of the American Red
Cross, and those passing the examina-
tions sent out from headquarters at
the end of the courses receive certi-
ficates as first aid workers, and as
auxiliary nurses.
The fee for the courses, including
membership in the American Red
Cross, is $4.00 for the first aid course,
and $5.00 for the course in home nurs-
ing, or $8.00 for the combined courses.
iobbs Addresses Academy of Science
Prof. W. H. Hobbs of the geology
department addressed the Illinois ac-
ademy of science at their banquet last
Friday night at Galesburg, Ill.
In the address, Professor Hobbs
extended greetings from the Michigan
academy of science.
It was at this meeting that the Illin-
ois academy celebrated its tenth an-
uiversary. Delegates from both na-
tional and state academies of science
were present.
Security League Issues Report
At the last meeting of the Ann Arbor
division of the National Security
league it agreed to issue to its mem-
bers the annual address of the chair-
man, the treasurer's report, and the
list of the members.
The work of the league will be noted
in this pamphlet and may be obtained
upon request of the members.

Union Makes Announcement
Money for Union membership dinner
tickets will be refunded after 5 o'clock
Wednesday, Feb. 28, at the Union- desk.
All engagements for the dance hall
and dining rooms will necessarily
have to be cancelled until repairs have
been made.
War Loan Now Totals $7,564,750,000
London, Feb. 26.-The war loan sub-
scription totaled $7,564,750,000, Chan-
cellor of the Exchequer Bonar Law an-
nounced in the house of commons to-
day.

YARROWDALE
CREW FREED
Washington, Feb. 26.- Ambas-
sador Willard at Madrid today cab-
led the state department that the
72 American Yarrowdale prisoners
were released Feb. 16. The dis-
patch, was very brief, and did not
contain any information as to
whether the Americans had been
given transportation out of Ger-
many. The message was sent to
the Madrid foreign' office by the
Spanish ambassador at Berlin, who
represents American interests in
Germany.
ISSUE CALL FOR 1918
OPERA BOOK WRITERS
TO HOL1 ORCHESTRA TRYOUTS
WEDNESDAY TO SELECT
MEN FOR TRIPS
All men interested in the writing of
the 1918 Union opera book are urged
to be present at the meeting to be
held at 4 o'clock this afternoon at the
Union. At this meeting instructions
will be given as to what is required
and the form in which the book should
be written.
The scenario will " be written first
and then s*bmitted to the dialogue
writers.
Tryouts for orchestra parts will be
held at 4 o'clock tomorrow afternoon,
the place to be announced in Wednes-
day's Daily. Twenty men will be
needed.
Due to the courtesy of the Univer-
sity Y. M. C. A. part of the chorus and
cast rehearsals will be held in Lane
hall. The chorus will hold its next
rehearsal at 4 o'clock this afternoon
in that building and the cast will meet
at 7 o'clock tomorrow evening at
Harris hall.
FOOD SOUNDS NOISY
Not When Eaten but When Spelt; so
British Bar "Scrapple"
Philadelphia, Feb. 26.- Far-famed
Philadelphia scrapple, a concoction
once eaten, always remembered, is
now barred from entering Britian be-
cause its name sounds like shrapnel.
Henry W. Thornton, American general
manager of the Great Eastern railway,
being a native of Philadelphia, fond
of scrapple, recently wrote from Lon-
don to a friend here to send him some
scrapple. The friend never received
the letter. Thompson investigated and
found that the British censor refused
to pass the letter, because of the bel-
ligerent sound of the word.
Owing °o Growth Technic Moves
The 'Iechnic has moved, due to the
grc ;eth of the Engineering society and
the magazine. Each organization had
its offices in the small room above the
arch.
The Technic had its first choice and
made its move, taking all its belong-
ings and establishing itself in rooms
269-271 new engineering building. At
present the editor and his staff oc-
cupy one room and the business end
the other. Changing in such a hurry,
it was impossible to arrange every-
thing in ship-shape manner. Now the
engineering pamphlets and prints are

sold over, two drawing desks which
will serve temporarily until a new
"bar" can be purchased.
All engineering students are invited
to inspect the new offices and the
staff is anxious to accommodate all
those who were neglected in the former
close quarters.
Prof. Closser to Lecture in De Witt
Prof. 0. C. Closser will lecture this
evening in De Witt on "The Dorninant
and Recessive Traits of Man."!

TENSION GREAT WHEN WILSON
APPEARS TO DISCUSS
SITUATION
FLOOD DRAWS BILL
TO BACK EXECUTIVE

Hot Fight for
suit;

Extra Session May
Senators, Give
Opinions

Re-

SENIOR LITS NOT
CUNARDER LAONIA EDETERRED BY FIRE
BIGGET PRIE OFMere Ravages of Elements Do Not
Daunt Spirits, of Grave
I Dancers
..R A MA -1~ - .. . . - --

PRESIDENT ASKS ARMED NEUTRALITY
FOR MERCHANTMEN AND ASSURANCE
Of SUPPORT FROM JOINT CONGRESS

By Carl D. Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, Feb. 26.-President
Wilson today appealed to a Joint ses-
sion of congress for permission to arm
American merchantmen for the estab-
lishment of an armed neutrality, and
for assurance that he may exercise
such authority as he deems necessary
to handle the German-American situa-
lion, declaring that he is the friend of
peace, and intends to preserve it for
Americans as long as he is able.
The president emphasized the fact
that he neither asks nor contemplates
a step which might bring war through
the action of this country. H de-
clared that war could only come
through an act of Germany.
"No course of my choosing will
lead to war," he said. "War can only
come by the wilfull act and aggression
of others."
He added in almost the next sent-
ence that "We must defend our com-
merce and the lives of our people."
Wants Congress' Sanction
Wilson emphasized that while he
may now have full power to take what
steps are necessary, he desires that
congress, by its own vote, show that
it is behind him in whatever he may
decide is necessary.
While he asked specifically for
power to arm ships, he said that he
could not be any more specific, since
he could only decide, as the situation
developed, what specific thing should
be done.
Also Asks for Credit
The president also asked sufficient
credit to enable him to provide ade-
quate means of protection where they
are needed.
The house galleries were packed
with people who sat in tense silence
as the president outlined the interna-
tional developments since Germany is-
sued her U-boat decree. While the re-
sults of the German subsea campaign
are not yet fully disclosed, the presi-
dent said that an overt act has not
occurred.
"It will be foolish to deny that the
situation is fraught with the gravest
possibilities and dangers," he stated.
Foreign Affairs Committee Meets.
Chairman Flood called a meeting of
the house foreign affairs committee
immediately after the president's
speech. The committee will consider
a billwhich Flood started to draft be-
fore the message was" delivered, 'i-
corporating all the necessary legisla-
tion to give the president all the power
he wants. A bitter fight is expected
to develop over the coming resolution.
It was to stave off the passage of such
a resolution vesting the president with
such powers as he asks that the Re-
publicans last Friday began their fili-
buster in the senate.
Threats Congress Fight Again
The president today, some Republi-
can leaders declared, asked, as a mat-
ter of fact, a blanket sanction of any
course he may see fit to follow short
of war. As a result there were im-
mediately rumblings of a resumption
of the fight to force congress into an
extra session.
Senator Lewis, Democratic whip,
said:
"The president asked congress to
duplicate the power given to Pres
dent McKinley to protect the country
preceding the Spanish-American war,
and that which we gave to President
Wilson for the protection of our com-
merce at that time we went to Vera
Cruz."
Flood Supports President
Chairman Flood said:
"I think, under the circumstances,
the suggestions made by the president
should be enacted into law promptly.
There will be opposition to some sug-
gestions he has made, but I have no

doubt that the house will embody sub-
stantially all his suggestions in a bill,
and that it will pass the house by a
(Continued on Page Six)

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