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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 24, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T HE MICRHIGA1N DAILY

52 A Few Days Longer [5%
FWhile The Cold Weather Lasts I_
I Suits and Overcoats I
STEIN-BLOCK and MICHAEL-STERN
1-4 Off CLOTHIES 1-4 Off
Entire stock fancy and mixed Entire stock blue and black
Suits and Overcoats Suits and Overcoats
AT1.4 OFF AT 20oOFF
Our entire stock
All trousers over $4.00 MACKINAWS
AT 20% OFF AT 20% OFF
Lindenschmitt, ANa &Co.&
..I1111111111111111111101110 iii11111111111111111111111111111101111111111111111111111111111111' lIllh11a
At Fourth Ave. and Liberty St.
Laboratory Supplies

Calkins

We carryin stck

You men who must b

Drug

Old Hampshire Bond

economical

"The Stationery of a Gentleman"

Co.

324 S. State St. or 1123 S. University Ave.

UY
India Well Known to Commercial
World Long fefore Christian Era

Have you considered next winter's overcoat prob-
lem or are you putting it off? You know you will
have to have one and we assure you that prices will

be higher next fall.

Isn't it good business to buy one

now while you can get the pick of our stock for %
off?
Home of Hart Schaffner and Marx clothing

Chemicals

- Drugs -

Toilet Articles

and Drug Sundries
The Eberbach & Son Co.

In the first installment of the third
article of a series of 12 dealing with
India, Dr. N. S. Hardikar tells of the
importance of that country in ancient
times.
When an American scholar visits
India, the first thing that he notices is
that the people of that country are
poor. He then wonders whether they
were in the same condition in the
past centuries.
As he studies patiently he finds that
India was not only rich and prosper-
ous, but well known to the world in
the olden times. It is the avarice of
the foreign powers that has put India
in the condition she is today.
India was well known to the world
before the Christian era. Through her
trade and commerce she was known
to the Phoenicians, Abyssinians, Syr-
ians, Greeks, and Romans. Through
her Buddhist missions she was known
to China, Japan, and the islands of
the Pacific.
Images Signify High Ideals
The Carvan images of certain deities
which have been found today in this
country signify that there were peo-
ple here who, in even those days were
idealistic like the people of India. It
gives us a clue that the Indo-Aryans

might perhaps have migrated to this
country and settled here. Many ex-
amples can be cited to prove that
Hindusthan was known to the world
at large centuries before Vasco-De-
Gama ever went to India.
In the time of Solomon, the Hebrew
ruler of Israel, a trade was established
between India and Syria, Palestine,
and other countries. This is proved
by the Sanscrit words which appear
in the bible as names of articles of
export, such as ivory, apes, peacocks,
and sandlewood. King Solomon him-
self sent a fleet to the Indian ocean
to bring gold to his country, with
which to build Jerusalem.
Traded with European Nations
In Roman times the Indians were
trading with European nations. So
eager did the Romans become for In-
dian articles that they commonly paid
as much as 10 times the original price.
During the rule of Darius the Great,,
king of Persia (521 to 485 B. C.), In-
dia was so rich that she attracted his
attention. Darius conquered a part
of India and carried away wealth
amounting to eight million pounds
sterling. Alexander the Great invaded
India, attracted largely by her fabu-
lous wealth.
(Editor's note-This article, will be
concluded tomorrow.)

Reule Conlin, Fiegel Co.

"It pas to come down town"
Southwest corner of Liberty and Main Sts.

I

....

r

waoir

.

Cordovans
We have just received
another shipment of
this popular shoe in
BLACK and TAN.
Special Agency Nettleton shoes

MI'd=Wi nter

Clearance

t

Sale.
STILL ON AT

WAHK'SStho

stoe
St a'e St.

Campus Bootery

308 S. tate 5t.

pmall

One of Our Dinners!
Served froin 11 to 7
Regular Dinner 35c consists choice of
meats; mashed or boiled potatoes; one
vegetable; choice of pie or pudding; tea,
coffee, or milk.
SPECIALS, as served
Soup .10 with meat order .05
Roast or Fricassee of chicken .25
Roast Prime Ribs of Beef .25
Roast Leg of Veal with Dressing 1 .25
Pork Sausage with Sweet Potatoes .25
Pork Chops Breaded. Extra Special .25
Small Steak with Onidns. Ex. Spec'l .25
Bread and Mashed Potatoes included
with above meat orders.
Side Orders Extra
Potatoes mashed o5 Stewed tomatoes .o5
Potatoes boiled .05 Stewed corn .0
Potatoes fried .05 Stewed peas .05
Potatoes german fried .o5
flodae made pies per cut .05 Rice cus-
tard .o5, with cream io.
Coffee .05 Tea .05 Chocolate .05
Milk per bottle .05 Cocoa .io
TATE
SREET LUNCH.
Open All Night. J. A. QUACKENBUSH, Mgr.
ALL-OHIO RAGTIME ORCHESTRA

i iMAU -

Tailors are rushed during
the opening, spring days.
Let us suggest to you the
wisdom of ordering your
Spring Togs NOW. Our
new line is complete and
we are prepared to serve
you best at this time.
MARQUARDT
CAMPUS TAILOR
516 E. WILLIAM ST.

ATTCKS FRANCK'S TAL
CARLOS G. LOPEZ, '17E, OBJECTS
TO STATEMENTS MADE ABOUT
SOUTH AMERICA
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
Last I Wednesday Mr. Harry A.
Franck gave in Hill auditorium an
illustrated lecture on South America.
This lecture is apt to leave in the
minds of his listeners a wrong im-
pression of that section of the con-
tinent about which he spoke. The pur-
pose of this article is to bring out the
true meaning of his lecture and to ex-
plain the reason why Mr. Franck was
not in a position to give a lecture of
the scope suggested by his advertise-
ments.
In the first place the pictures, with
the exception of a few, and the lecture
presented by Mr. Franck are not rep-
resentative of the development of civ-
ilization of the countries which he vis-
ited, but rather of the life, and pe-
culiarities of the Indians with whom
he dealt, and who compose the lowest
type of the South American races.
To present such pictures and call
them representative of those countries
is almost as absurd as if I were to
travel in this country through the
South or through those estates where
Indian reservations are located, and
after observing the life and peculiar-
ities of the negroes and Indians, tell
the people of South American about
them and their primitive ways of liv-1
ing, and leave in their minds the im-
pression that what I have presented
to them about these peoples is truej
throughout the United States.I
Mr. Franck traveled through South'
America in a way, and with an attire
which probably made it almost impos-
sible for him to get in touch with the
educated people of the countries he
visited. /Not because in South Amer-
ica people are judged entirely by the
clothes they wear, but because there,
like in many other countries, where
the class distinction is marked, one
roust appear dressed in conformity
,ith his class before he is given due
attention. Mr. Franck, accordingly,
iade almost no mention of the edu-
eated element in South America, and
certainly is hardly qualified to give a
lecture on such a broad subject as
"South America." The more suitable
title for his lecture would be "The

Life, Peculiarities and Types of In-
(ians of South America."
It is true that he traveled in a way
that enabled him to see and remem-
uer things better than the average
Lourist, yet his lecture is nothing else
whan a detailed account of the oddities
of an ignorant people and designed to
Keep the listeners in a state of hilarity
during the presentation of his subject.
it may be interesting, but it certainly
was not the instructive lecture which
atudents and people of this city, who
nave heard of the wonders of South
America, expected to hear. Thus he
is unable to do justice to the civilized
people of South America; by talking
only of Indian life and costumes he
causes the listeners to believe that
all the people of South America, their
life and commodities must be of the
types shown by his pictures.
It is this wrong impression left in
the minds of the listeners that I wish
to rectify. I, as a resident of Quito,
positively know that a person who
goes to Ecuador, or to any other coun-
try of the western coast of South
America, with the idea of living com-
fortably and of meeting educated and
cultured people, can do so just as well
as in any other place on the face of
the earth.
CARLOS G. LOPEZ, '17E.
REV. FRANK OHLINGER TO GIVE
ILLUSTRATED TALK4ON CHINA
Publisher of First Christian Newspa-
per in Orient, Will Tell of
Experiences, Sunday
Rev. Frank Ohlinger, who will give
an iniustrated lecture on China, in the
Unitarian church at 6:30 o'clock to-
morrow night, has the distinction of
being the president of the first Anglo-
Saxon Chinese school ever founded in
that country.
Rev. Ohlinger left this country in
1870 to do evangelistic work in China,
first going with his wife to Korea. To
help along his work, he established the
first printing press in that city, He,
then weit to Shanghai to do literary
work, where he translated many Am-
erican articles into Chinese, in order
to help educate the people.
The first Christian newspaper ever
published in China, was printed by
Rev. Ohlinger, and was called the
Zion-Herald.
11.s talk tomorrow night will be of
his experiences in that country.

b'~minuinm~a~nmiM3I~

J unday Attacked
by Prof._Nearing
<conomist Who Lectured Here Friday
Scores Methods of Famous
Evangelist
Prof. Scott Nearing of the Univer-
sity of Toledo, who spoke in Univer-
sity Hall last night, is an authority on
contemporary religion and sociology,
as well as political economy. Among
Professor Nearing's latest books are
"Social Religion" and "The New Edu-
cation."
Shortly before he had been dismiss-
ed from the University of Penisyl-
'ania for his radical views, Profes-
sor Nearing wrote an open letter to
Billy Sunday in which he said:
"You are preaching in a winter, al-
most without parallel for the amount
of distress and suffering among the
poor, yet you have mainly directed
your invectives against the churches,
Are the churches the chief culprits?
Is not the world beginning to realize
that today the most sinister crimes
against the ideals of Christ's religion,
are committed by the system of in-
dustry for profit, a system which pays
wages so low that even if the poor
were made spiritually and morally
perfect, they would be still abjectly,
destitute. Interpret your doctrine of
salvation in terms of modern life.
Would not Jesus if he were face to
face with a multitude of $10 a week
men, feed their bodies before he at-
tempted to save their souls?"
SHORT HIGHWAY ENGINEERING
COURSE TERMINATES FRIDAY
Enrollment Shows 200 Men Took Ad-
vantages of Work in Road
Building

I-FO
I T i
FilforimaClothes

Tirs t

Sowing

Of
Spring Clothes

day night, Feb. 27, at the Union. The
committee wishes to announce that
the smoker will be open to all stu-
dents from the Buckeye state as well
as the members of the organization.
Admission fee for the smoker will
be 25 cents. Tickets are now on sale
and may be obtained from the various

We are showing
nobbiest line of

t1

SPRING SUITS

and

TO ENTERTAIN CLUB AT SMOKER committeemen.
An all-Ohio orchestra, with plenty For results advertise in The Mich-
of ragtime string-pickers, will furnish igan Daily
the music for the annual smoker of
Ohio club members to be given Tues- Try a Michigan Daily Want Ad.
Leave Copy Leave Copy
at at
Quarry's and Students'
The Delta Supply Store
AD VERTIS ING

TOP COATS

in the city.

LOST.

LOST-Large, black purse between
Dental College and Hill Auditorium
Friday noon. Finder please call
1024-M. 24-5
LOST-Gold class ring, L. L. B., '16,
and onwer's name inside. Reward.
Phone 988-J. 24
WANTED
WANTED-Student wishes to care for
one or two motor cars, will drive a
few hours in the afternoon if requir-
ed. Box 10, Michigan Daily. 24-5-7
WANTED-About 31 customers at the
Hub Billiard Parlors. Across from
the Interurban Station. 23-4-51

t (R KENT
FOR RENT- Single room, $2.00 per
week, 908 Monroe Ave. Phone
1549-R. -tf
FOR RENT- Desirable front, roorm
908 Forest Ave. 21-22-23-2-
AUTOMOBILE-Will drive or do re-
pair work on your car everyday aft
er* 12 A. M., excepting Monday.
Please address card to Box 11, Mich-
igan Daily. 24
PRIVATE BOARD $5 weekly. Inquire
at 410 Church street. Phone 450-R.
20-21-22-23-24-25-2

After a successful session the short
course in highway engineering came
to a close yesterday afternoon. The
enrollment book showed that exactly
200 had taken advantage of the work
which has been given here. The men
who took the course were largely
county road commissioners and high-
way engineers. It is intended to give
these men a chance to learn the late:'
developments in road building at .-
time when their regular work is not
very pressing.
Much information abcut the newer
road materials, and improved method&
of applying old materials, was brou;h'
out at the meetings. Thenilaboratory
work afforded an opportunity for th<
practcal men to get the kind of work
that formerly, only the college gradu
ata could obtain.
GROCERS ANT) BUTCHERS VOTE
TO MEET IN ANN ARBOR IN 191S.
Ann Arbor will be the scene in 1918
of the annual Grocers and Butchers'
conference, which met at Kalamazoo,

Also a big line of the
New Spring Hats,
Caps, anid Furnjsl-
in gs.

Grinnell ros.' ru sIc House

See us for anvthini in the
Rear'm of Music

TOM CORE3ETT
116 E. Liberty St.
"fie Yuurg Nen 's Shop"
Tu y n cay '-dThursday
This welC. The vet oo 22-1 to 68
favor c coming hare, Sagmiaw bei
the ether city that desired the co
feren ce.<
Tfhe local men have already ma
some of the necessary arrangemen
for the meeting.

TRY OUR VICTOR RECORD APPROVAL SERVICE

116 S. Main St.

Phone 1707

-I

'1

'

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