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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 24, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Irl"t, IV

ANNOUNCING OUR EXHIBIT,
Spring and Summer Suitings
American and Foreign Sources in Artistic and Striking Designs
YOUR INSPECTION INVITED

I

I

G. H. Wild Company

Merchant Tailors

STATE STREETI

University
TEXT BOOKS
Now and Secorndhamnd

he Slater Book Shop

STOP AT
UTUS
3S8 S. STATE
>r sodas and lunches
FORGE BISCHOFF
"L O RIST
ice Cut Flowers and Plants
hapin St. Ann Arbor, Mich.,
PHONE 809 M

Rowe City Laundry
406 Detroit St
Cash cards save you money
PHONE 457-M
FIRST NATL BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Capital $xoo,ooo Surplus and Profit $6g,ooo
DIRECTORS

Wirt Cornwell
Geo. W. Patterson
S. W. Clarkson
Fred Schnid

Waldo M. Abbott
Harry M. Hawley
HarrisonSoule
D. B. Sutton

E, D. Kinnie

.

e Carry a Large Assortment of Candies

We can Satisfy Your Taste
A TRIAL WILL CONVINCE YOU

The Fountain of Youth
State Street Cor. Liberty

We Offer You
CURITY - - SERVICE - - LOCATION
Resources $3,8oo,ooo
on Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869r
An Office--
Northwest Corner-Main and Huron
ach Offiee-
707 North University Ave.
Farners & Mechanics Bank
olrs the Best in Modern Banking
SEOURITY - - EFFICIENCY
tent and Pleasant Quarters. You Will
ased With Our service. Two Offices
5 S. Main St. - 334S. State St.
WE SUGAR BOW1
109 S. Main St. j

SPECIAL SUNDAES
LIGHT LUNCHES

Our candies are made in
our own sanitary shop.
et a typewriter from
0. D. MORRILL
$22 South State Street
i will furnish you an instruction
ok free of charge. You will be a
ist before you know it.
aomen

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Stweon Dtroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Casrun on ]Anstern time, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:35 a.
M., 8:o a. m. and hourly to 7:1o p. in., 9:10
p. m.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. in and
everytwo hours to 6:48 p. m.; to Lansing,
8:41p.m,.
Jackson Express Cars-(Local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-:48 a. m. and every two hours
to 7-:48 p. m.
Local Cars Eastbound--5:35 a. m., 6:40 a
., y:es a..m. and every two hours to 7:05 p.
S., o p, n., 9:oS p. M., 10:50 p. M. to
Ys aiti only, 9:20 a. M., 9:so a. M., 2:05 p
ar., 6:1 p. ., x1:45 p. m, i:o a. M., 1:2
a. m. To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound-6.os a. M., y:5 a.
an., 10 :20 . m.. i12:o a. Mn.
® Takes icures
Develops Films
Swaimakes Prints
and Enlarge-
mets,
713 E. VNIVERSITY
'The University of Chicago
O Ein addition to resident
S Ework. offers also instruc-
STUYtion by correspondence.
For detailed in-
formation address
Sth Yer U.fC.(Div.).Gic tit.l. su1
FRENCH SOLDIER TO SPEAK
IN HARRIS HALL ON SUNDAY
M. Jean Albert Picard, who recently
delivered a lecture in Alumni Me-
morial hall on the subject of "French
Ideals," will speak at 3 o'clock Sunday
in Harris hall on "The Religious
Spirit of France Today."
M. Picard was connected with Scrib-
ners magazine until the start of the
European war when he joined the col-
ors of France. He was at the front
until last winter when he was dis-
abled, causing his retirement.
Forestry Club to Hold First Smoker
The Forestry club will hold their
first smoker of the semester next
Wednesday night in room 214 natural
science building.
Prof. L. J. Young of the forestry
department will speak on "The Ap-
palachians."
There will be smokes, eats, and
music. All are invited whether mem-
bers of the club or not.
Announce Chaperones for Union Dance
Chaperones for the Union dance to-
night are: Prof. Hugh M. Beebe of
the Homoeopathic Medical school and
Mrs. Beebe, and Prof. Henry H. Hig-
bie of the engineering college and Mrs.
Higbie. There still remain 15 tickets
for the dance which may be obtained
at the Union desk.
Extension Lectures
Prof. Louis Eich will speak in Bar-
rion Springs, Mich., this evening, on
"Present American Poets."
"George Bernard Shaw" is the sub-
ject of a lecture to be given by Prof.
0. C. Marckwardt, in Grand Rapids,
tomorrow.
Featuring hot soda for zero weather.
Bloomfields. N. University.

Official newspaper at the University of
Mi gan. Published every morning except
Minday during the university year.
Entered at thepost-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter,
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier, $2.50; by mail, $3..
Want ad. stations: Quarry's; Students' Sup-
ply Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Ph ones: Business, 96; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed Soo words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker.........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Bsiness Manager
Conrad N. Church..............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn ...................ity Editr
Harold A. Fitzgeald......... Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor
Marian Wilson..............Women's Editor
Carleton W. Rea4e.........Statistical Editr
E. Campbell.. .Assistant Business Manager
. Philip Emery..Assistant Business Manager
Albert E. Horne..Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau.. .Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter... Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
J. L. Stadeker E. L. Zeigler
C. M.ickling I.M ae
.A. aney L. W. Nieter
L. S. Thompson E. A. Baumgarth
Reporters
H. C. Garrison C. L. Roeser
C. S. Clark D. S. Rood
R. H. Fricker G. 0. Brophy
B. I. Millar F. A. Taber
D, H. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
K. L. Wehmeyer J, P. Hart
Annetta L. Wood J. C. Martin
T. F. McAllister Allan Shoenfield
Business Staff
Bernard Woh J. E. Robinson
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Earl F. Ganschow
Walter R. Payne Jackson W. Smart
Harold R. Smith Seymour B. Wilson
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1917.
Night Editor-). S. Food
CLASS TOQUES
Last 9vening as we were walking
down tate street we passed a group
of day laborers. Among them was a
large colored gentleman wearing a
sophomore toque. Just in front of
him was a little foreigner wearing a
senior toque. At least, we judged he
was a foreigner from the chunks of
conversation which battered their
way through the atmosphere.
A few minutes before he had been
hailed with a "Buy a paper, sir?" from
a youth crowned with a freshman
toque. Evidently junior toques were
not so popular-they soil too easily.
We had a feeling that we wanted
to yell "Hats," when we saw the soph-
omore and senior, but we were afraid
that the foreigner might not under-
stand our barbarious language--and
the gentleman from Africa was too
husky. Silence was safest, though it
seemed shameful.
A year or so ago the Student coun-
cil took action to prevent the sale of
class toques to all except University
students, but this did not bother those
scholared in the University of Hard
Knocks, who desired toques, and who
scorned purchase when there is a bet-
ter way of getting them. There still
is, as always, an easily available sup-
ply of somewhat worn toques discard-
ed each year by their rightful owners.
Ideas of sanitation or sentiment do
not prevent their appropriation.
If Michigan's traditional toque is to
be kept from becoming common prop-
erty the supply must be cut off. The
means lies in the hands of the stu-
dents themselves. Discarded toques
must be hors de combat when they
are abandoned, or better still, there
should be a Toque Night when the
balmy breezes begin to blow for the

cremation of all toques which have
rendered us a year of faithful serv-
ice. No one has ever seen a coal
heaver wearing a fresh cap.
Students, faculty, and alumni are
looking toward March 30. Yes that's
the date of the next Regents meeting.
We counted one flag to every 10
houses on February 22.
Now they say that President Wilson
mobilized the National Guard to gel
"Roosevelt" instead of Villa. Judging
from the results this is self-evident.
Freshman to senior on reading that
Michigan is to re-enter conference in
1918: "Grow old with me, the best of
life is yet to be."
"Got change for a potato" is said
to be a common question in New York
City. We won't laugh until someone
asks us to break a soup bone.
Ballot on Honor System at Oklahoma
In a straw ballot which was held at
the University of Oklahoma on the
subject of military training only 66
ballots were cast against the question
out of a total of 611 cast. Eighty
votes for compulsory training, 239 for
a two-year compulsory system, while;
226 votes in favor of an optional sys-
tem were cast.

LECTURES ON TUBERCULOSIS
DIr. I. :. C(umminigs Describes Dread
(Disease to Health Representatives
"Tuberculosis is one of the common-
est diseases known," said, Dr. H. H.
Cummings of the health service in
an illustrated lecture Thiursday even-
ing before the University health rep-
resentatives in the natural science
auditorium. "Over 160,000 die of tu-
berculosis in the 'United States every
year. In Germany the percentage is
even higher."
Dr. Cummings' remarks were' con-
fined to tuberculosis of the lungs, the
entry of the disease into the body, its
development, and the measures taken
by the various boards of health for its
treatment.
The fourth lecture for the Univer-
sity health representatives will be
given on March 6.
IFN:lI") LAWS M AE MERRY AT
WilIN 'O'S BITIIA I PAR'TY
"One of the best afternoon parties
the Law school ever held," was the
verdict of many of those who attend-
ed the Washington's birthday party
given by the senior law class at the
Union Thursday afternoon. The na-
tional colors were in evidence every-
where.
Fisher's five-piece banjorine orches-
tra on an improvised stand in the
center of the floor furnished the music
while 70 couples enjoyed themselves
to the utmost.
RE IPT FR BASKT OF OiL
hOOKS 1)ISCOVE1{EJ) ON TABLET
A receipt for a basket of books, four
or five thousand years old, has been
brought to light by Mr. Stephen Lang-.
don, '98, in his recent translations of
ancient tablets, in the museum of the
University of Pennsylvania. In ad-
dition to this receipt, an interesting
map of the same period has been
deciphered.
Although Mr. Langdon is at present
at the University of Pennsylvania. he
is the only man of American birth to
have held a full professorship at Ox-
ford university.
For results advertise in the Mich-
gan Daily.

LAN DERS
OR
FL0%WE RS

PHONE 294

213 F.1

Liberty St.

MICHIGAN STUDENTS

NOTICE!
Students interested
in Spring or Summer
Vacation Work may
file their applications
with the "Y" Employ-
ment secretary now.
Office open from
3 to 6 p. m. daily.

Member of Florists' Telegraph
Delivery Servie
Flowers by Wire to All the World.
.1

Leave your DULL Safety Razor
Blades to be SHARPENED with
William W. Bebringer
11 NICKELS OARCADE

E

REED CROSS TO BEGIN VIGOROUS
CAMPAIGN FOR LOCAL WORKERS
Ann Arbor's chapter of the Ameri-
can Red Cross which was organized
several weeks ago, is about to begin
a vigorous campaign among the resi-
dents of Ann Arbor and the students
of the University for workers. The
supply bureau of the local chapter will
begin' its work in the chapter rooms
on the second floor of the Y. M. C. A.
at 110 North Fourth street at 9 o'clock

on Monday morning, Feb. 19.
Mrs. I. D. Loree will have charge
of the making of surgical d'ressings
at this time, and on Tuesday and Wed-
nesday Mrs. Louis P. Hall will meet
women who wish to sew for the Red
Cross. It is not necessary that one
be a member of the organization to
do this relief work.

March Records are now on
Allmendinger's Music Shop.
Liberty.

sale at
122 E.
22-24

We have what you want and the kind of service you desire. =
-
Loose Leaf Note Books-Lab Outfits, Aprons, Shop
. Tools, etc., etc.
w
UNIVER.SITY BOOKSTOR ES
T l - - V !
1ir
.---=d7
{Y
h - c :_ . . n r . ., r.4 .~

on
1916 Feet

Uc
Some Fellows
Get Cold

,wt av
;

Annual luncheon of University of
[ichigan women, at noon today at the
otel Addison, Detroit.
Hospital Notes
Haynes E. Edison, '20E, 417 East
niversity avenue, and William P.
anderd, '19, are confined in the Phi
igma Kappa fraternity, 1003 East
uron street, with the German meas-
a.
H. D. Ketchen,'19, 516 Walnut street,
as sent to the contagious hospital
hursday afternoon, to be treated for
iphtheria.
Louis W. Schoon, '17E, 302 South
ivision street, who was recently op-
'ated on for appendicitis at the Un-
ersity hospital, was released yester-
ay afternoon.
Shirts made to measure. G. H. Wild
o., Leading Merchant Tailors. State
t. tf
Dancing classes and private lessons
the Packard Academy. tt
Get your shoes fixed at Paul's Place,
1 E. William St. 5tf

You wear a 1916 hat, a 1916
suit.
But you wear 1716 heels if you
wear leather heels.
You drive a 1916 car, use 1916
office or shop equipment, live
in a 1916 house.
But your leather heels are out
of date.
Leathertheels are as obsolete
as mustache cups, celluloid
dickeys and powdered peri\
wigs. They aren't. adaptable
to modern conditions.
This is the day of rubber
heels. They are individual
sh ockabsorbers-spine savers
-that make the hardest pave-
ments as soft as a Brussels
carpet.
They are made for 1916 pave.
ments.
Bring your heels up-to-date.
Wear O'Sullivan's Heels of
New Live Rubber. -
When you buy your new shoes, buy
them O'Sullivanized.
Insist on O'Sullivanized shoes; the
new live rubber heels give the great.
est wear with the greatest resiliency.
Conright, 1016, O's. R. Co.
J_, r

r

They don't seem to be able to stand the ice and
snow. They try to, poor chaps, but don't enjoy
themselves. Why is it? Not enough blood per-
haps. The furnace inside isn't wirking right. May-
be it hasn't the proper sort of Diel to work on.
There's a lot in this!
is good for sluggish furnaces. It's a good fuel. It
contains no slate or slag. Everything in it has food
value. The sort that builds the body and creates
an inner warmth with which to combat icy blasts
of winter. Furthermore it possesses another vir-
tue. It is extremely pleasant to eat - satisfyingly
crisp and of a delicious flavor. It is always fresh,
always clean, always welcome at any time of day
or night. Give it a try out. It will qualify.

The Shredded Wheat Co.

Niagara Falls, N.

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