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February 24, 1917 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-24

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;1

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND COLDER
TODAY

Q

ASfr ian

jDattu

UNITED PRE

DAY AND NIaIT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 99.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1917.

i6lUCL FIVE CEN

.._._,"

DRASTICCURTAILMENT OFALLIMPORTS
INTO ENGLAND,UETO FOOD CONDITION,
'SUGGESTED BY PREMIER LLOD GEORGE

WHEN

OLD FRIENDS MEET

--i

/ ,

GRADUATE SCHOOL Of MElLLE ANtI
SURGERY IN THE CITY OF BE TRO

ALL LUXURIES TO BE BANNED
AND NON-ESSENTIAL STAPLES
TO BE PROHIBITED I
FOOD STOCKS LOWEST
IN COMMONS' HISTORY
Measures are Necessary to Prevent
Disaster Says Minister to House
of Commons
By Ed. L. Keen
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
London, Feb. 23.-Face to face with
a menace of undoubted gravity to her
food supplies through operation of the
German submarine warfare, England
has determined upon the most drastic
curtailment of her imports. All lux-
uries will be banned. Non-essential
staples must make way for the necess-
ities of war. Premier David Lloyd
George announced such sweeping
steps in the house of commpns today.
The restrictive plans will affect the
very foundations of British life.
Bad Harvests Responsible
"If such a program is carried out,"
the premier gravely promised, "Eng-
land can face the enemy's worst.
Food stocks are lowest in our recol-
lection," England's man of the hour
declared, "due to bad harvests. For
the nation's life increased production
is necessary.
Increase of ImpaI)rts
The year before the war 15,000,000
tons of shipping entered British ports.
During the past year the total was 30,-
000,000 tons. This was due partly o.
the allotment of tonnage to our allies.
Italy and France are begging for more
ships. A considerable portion of our
tonnage has been sunk by submarines
during the past 30 months. The ratio
has been increased during the past
four or five months and this present
month. Enormous sacrifices are re-
quired testing the national grit."
Gives Ships to Allies
The part England has played as
mistress of the seas in giving freely
of her ships to her allies was striking-
ly revealed by the premier. He said
more than 1,000,000 tons of .ships had
been diverted to the use of France
alone. It was in this connection that
-the prime minister made a forceful
plea for more tonnage not only for
ordinary needs but for ilitary neces-
sities. "The grave measures are nec
essitated," he declared solemnly, "oth-
erwise there will be disaster.'"
Washington, Feb. 23.- Immediate
relief from high prices of certain food
stuffs is bound to result from Eng-
land's latest move in curtailing her
imports of non-essential staples of-
ficials of the commerce department
told the United Press today. The im-
mediate effect of the British order de-
partment officials said would. be to
release for home consumption large
supplies of food stuffs destined for
England but prohibited from being
imported there under the new order.
It is known that a large quantity of
food stuffs excluded by the curtail-
ment measure are in storage in New
York, Boston, and other large eastern
sea ports. Regarding curtailment of
apple importations export figures show
this country sent in 1916 to England,
874,587 barrels of apples and 1,163,641
pounds of dried apples valued at $3,-
389,477. Reduction of imports of ban-
anas, oranges, and other fruits into
England to 25 per cent of present
quantity means that only $1,250,000
worth can be sent to England where
$5,000,000 was sent there last year.
"For the fiscal year ending Jan. 31,
6, the total exports from this coun-
to the United Kingdom amounted
to $1,888,-14,301 or 30 per cent of our
total export trade," an official said.

(Continued on Page Six.)
1h

PROPOSALS OF
LLOYDGEORGE
1. The board of agriculture to
receive powers to enforce cultiva-
tion of food products.
2. Importation of foreign tea,
coffee, and cocoa to be prohibited.
3. Importation of canned sal-
mon to be reduced to 50 per cent.
4. Paper imports to be reduced
640,000 tons and a scheme of dis-
tribution made for supplying the
printing trade.
5. Importation of timber to be
banned.
6. Importation of apples and to-
matoes to be also prohibited.
7. Importation of oranges, ba-
nanas, and nuts restricted to 25
per cent of present imports.
8. All internal plans to econo-
mize and aid England in defeating
the German starvation policy.
9. Brewing bill to be limited to
10,000,000 barrels a year, thus af-
fecting a saving of 600,000 tons of
food stuffs now used in that in-
dustry.
10. Corresponding restrictions
to be made as to distillation of
spirits.
11. Guarantee to be given farm-
ers for minimum prices for some
years and a minimum wage of 25
shillings a week for agricultural
laborers to be fixed.
SUBMIT TRAINING
BILL TO CONGRESS
If Put Into Effect Would Raise and
Train Army of 500,000
Every Year
Washington, Feb. 23.-The universal
training plan of the general staff of
the army was submitted to congress
today by President Wilson. It carried
with it a letter of transmittal from
Secretary of War Baker. Neither the
president nor Secretary Baker ex-
pressed any form of recommendation.
War department officials say the
bill, if put in effect, would raise and
train an army of 500,000 every year.
"The plan would call out all able-
bodied male citizens in their nine-
teenth year for 11 months' continuous
training to be followed by two repeti-
tion courses of two weeks each, one in
their twentieth year and one in their
twenty-first year.
PI DELTA EPSILON ELECTS
FOUR NEW MEN TO MEMBERSHIP
Pi Delta Epsilon, national honorary
journalistic fraternity, has elected the
following to membership: Thomas F.
McAllister, '18, Norman Ibsen, '18E,
Robert C. Patterson, '18, and Elmer C.
Schacht, '18E.
A banquet will be held for the new
men at the Union next Wednesday
evening. Addresses are to be given by
a local newspaper man and faculty
members of the fraternity.
ALPHA NU CHOOSES DEBATERS
TO MEET ADELPHI TEAM
R. F. Matthews, '19, J. C. Cary, '19,
and C. E. Miller, '19, will comprise the
team representing the Alpha Nu De-
bating society in a joint debate with
the Adelphi, which will be held some-
time in April for the Detroit alumni
cup. Rodney A. Dunnette, '18, was
chosen alternate. These men were

chosen from eight tryouts who /spoke
last night at the Alpha Nu room.

REGENTS SILENT ON
CONFERENCE ISSUE
Burden of Administrative Business
Fills Entire Time of Session;
March 30 Next Meeting

ACTION
OF

TAKEN TllROUGk7 EFF
AMERICAN MEDICAL
ASSOCIATION

'Lr i 1 f 6 f
, J y ,
TAUL3KETT - f9

APPOINT MEN FOR OPERA9
COMMITTEE VACANCIES

MORGAN LEAVES FOR EAST
SELECT COSTUMES FOR
"FOOLS' PARADISE"

TOI

SENTIMENT FAVORS 'BACK
TO CONFERENCE' SLOSAN
FACULTY, STUDENTS, AND ALUMNI
ASSOCIATIONS EXPRESS
OPINIONS
Faculty, alumni, and student senti-
inent of the "back to the conference"
move received at The Daily office is
showing an overwhelming majority in
favor of a return to the western body.
The opposition to the move encount-
ered so far is practically negligible.
Faculty mei in particular seem to look
on the conference with favor, not a
dissenting voice having been raised as

New appointments to committees
for "Fools' Paradise" were announced
yesterday by Arthur A. Schupp, '17E,
general chairman of this year's opera.
Robert B. Frantz, '17E, was appoint-
ed chairman of the music committee
to take the place left vacant by Philip
Pack, '18, who was forced to resign
due to the press of other work. Harold
W. Collins, '18E, who was on the cos-

tumes committee

previously,

was yet from the teaching staff. Many of

switched to the position of electrician. those who opposed a return in 1913
Hugo- E. Braun, '19L, was placed on are in favor of it now, and even those
the costumes committee to fill this who endorsed the initial break with
vacancy. The last appointment was the conference colleges now see Mich-
that of Charles H. McCarty, '18, to the igan's athletic future only in the West.
stage committee. Alumni opinion, expressed through
Director Morgan left yesterday for the associations, is still strongly af-
Philadelphia, where he will personally firmative on the question. Messages
supervise the selection of the costumes received by The Daily yesterday from
for "Fools' Paradise." At the last re- the Michigan clubs at' Boston, Cleve-
hearsal, the members of the cast and land, Minneapolis, and New York tell
chorus were measured and Director of majority conference support in
Morgan will take these measurements these cities. Student opinion seems
personally to Van Horn and Son com- almost unanimously in favor of an
pany, who will supply the costumes immediate and unqualified return to
for the opera. the western body.
While Director Morgan is in the Deans Express Opinions
East, chorus and cast rehearsals will The following opinions were re-
continue as previously, the cast being ceived by The Daily yesterday:
under the supervision of Morrison C. Dean John R. Effinger of the Col-
Wood, '17, and the chorus being di- lege of Literature, Science, and the
rected by Alan V. Livingston, '17E. Arts-"I lpzve always opposed leaving
Before leaving, Director Morgan the conference and am in favor of a
emphasized the necessity of the con- return."
scientious continuance of the work Dean Henry M. Bates of the Law
during his absence. Both acts have school-"Je are doing the right thing
been gone over and explained suf- in returning. I was opposed to a -ith-
ficiently so that the cast can continue drawal in the first place."
alone and he expects them to have Dean Marcus L. Ward of the College
their parts completely memorized and of Dentistry-"I have not heard the
in good running order by his return. full arguments of both sides, but from
Work on the chorus has been progress- what I have heard, I am in favor of a
ing rapidly, the men being given a return."
two or three-hour drill daily, with, at Dean Victor C. Vaughan of the Med-
times, a rehearsal both in afternoon ical school-"I would like to see Mich-
and in evening. igan return- to the conference."
Attention is called to the meeting Dean Alfred H. Lloyd of the Grad-
to be held at 4 o'clock Tuesday after- uate school---"I am in favor of return-
noon at the Union for all those who ing."
are interested in writing the book for Registrar Arthur G.' Hall-"I'd be
next year's opera, as the plan of the glad to see Michigan go back."
On Monday the chorus will rehearse Prof. Louis A. Strauss-"Is there
book will be outlined at this time. any question?"
at 4 o'clock at the Union and the cast Coach Stephen J. Farrell of the Var-
at 7 o'clock. sity track team-"A return to the con-
ference will mean much, as far as
Ask $8,000,000 for Illinois University track competition is concerned."
Chicago. Feb. 23.-An appropriation Intramural Coach Floyd A. Rowe-
$8,000,000 will be asked of the present "The action the board in control
state legislature for new buildings and expresses mylpinion."
proposed improvements. (Continued on Page Six.)

With all .eyes strained upon the
board of regents in expectation to see
some action taken, either for or
against the Conference, at their meet-
ing yesterday afternoon, the much-
heralded decision on the question was
passed over, and the matter was not
even mentioned. Because of the pres-
sure of detail work and the task of
making up the program for the ensu-
ing year, the time was so taken up
that the routine work was barely con-
eluded by the time of adjournment.
What the action will be when the
next meeting occurs on March 30, is as
much a matter of conjecture as it has
been previously. However, the ad-
vocates of the Conference, believe it
only to be a delay in the program of a
speedy return.
While none of the members of the
board could be induced to express any
definite opinion on the subject, from
some of the comments on the proposi-
tion yesterday, it was hinted that
there might be some difference of
opinion when the subject was discuss-
ed at the next meeting. The reply to
all inquiry on the question was that
the Conference had not been mention-
ed, and would not be considered until
next month, when it may be brought
up.
In regard to the failure of th' board
to act, Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, chair-
man of the board in control of athlet-
ics, intimated that there was no anxi-
ety on the outcome of the measure be-
cause of the halt in the proceedings,
and that there was only a small
chance in the beginning that the
board would be able to discuss the
matter. Director of Athletics, Phillip
G. Bartelme said that in view of the.
failure of the Regents to act, he had
no statement to make.
Regent Junius E. Beal, the resident
representative of the board, when ask-
ed last night for his opinion on the
present situation, said that the matter
was not taken up in the meeting yes-
terday, because of the press of busi-
ness, and that he could not tell even
if 'it were to be considered the next
time the board met.
CONFERENCE BEGINS
Many Students Sign Up for Volunteer
Conference in This City
At 9 o'clock last night, 260 students
from the various colleges in Michi-
gan had registered for the student vol-
unteer conference being held in this
city and learly 100 more were sta 'd-
ing in line awaiting their turn to reg-
ister and get assigned to rooms.
Until a late hour last evening there
were not enough places of. entertain-
ment for the unexpected number of
delegates that were pouring into Lane
hall. At the first meeting held in the
Methodist church appeals were made
to the townspeople to take care of
more delegates.
J. Fennel Turner, general secretary
of the student volunteer work, and in
charge of the program, introduced
Mrs. Helen Barratt Montgomery who
gave a short interesting talk. The
general theme of this talk was about
the wonderful work accomplished with
the people of India and the pressing
need for more workers.
Dr. D. W. Ussher of Van, Turkey, the
next speaker, gave a vivid description
of the massacres of the Armenians by
the Turks.

TO OPERATE DETROIT
COLLEGE AS BRANCH
Board Grants degrees; Registrations
Received from Prof. 0. L. Spouser
and R. R, Lounsbury
Perhaps the biggest thing that has
happened to the Medical school of
the University of Michigan during the
past 50 years, and an affair that will
revolutionalize administrative meth-
ods and may possibly lead to the
transfer of the entire department to
Detroit, is the result of the adoption
of the report of the joint committee
of Regents and nedical faculty, by
the board of regents, at their meeting
yesterday afternoon.
The repc-ct which was adopted was
drawn up on the recommendation
made by the Educatibnal Council of
the American Medical association, of
which Dean Victor C. Vaughan of the
Medical school, was the national pres-
ident two years ago. Following is the
report in its final form as adopted:
"The Regents of the University of
Michigan will undertake the adminis-
tration and control of a Graduate
School of Medicine and Surgery in
Detroit, to be maintained from the in-
come from donated funds Ind student
fees, providing;
1. That the Detroit College of Med-
icine shall first have surrendered its
charter and terminated its corporate
existence, conveyed to the Rogents its
title to all real estate, and equipment
of which it is possessed free and un-
encumbered, together with all rights
and privileges in the hospitals of De-
troit which it now enjoys, and shall
exert through its trustees and faculty,
its ifluence in continuing and expend-
ing such rights and pr vil s.
"2. That the rghts deemed ade-
quate by the Regents be secured for
the University from Harper hospital,
or other hospits, "or the purpose of
instruction in medicine and surgery,
and that a fund of not less than $1,-
000,000, shall first have been created
in cash or approved securities to be
transfered to, and invested by the
Regents for the benefit of such Grad-
uate School of Meemine and Surgery."
Hospitals Offer Field
By the adoption c. the above re-
port, the present:et., College of
Medicine will be taken ovser by the
Regents and operat *-1 as' a branch of
the Medical schoo in Ann Arbor.
This matter has been a source of agi-
tation for many years, and its ad-
vocates were beginning to believe that
in spite of their efforts, the plan was
to prove of little avail. Prominent
medical men on the faculty have al-
ways favored Detroit as a location for
a graduate school, or even as the site
for the present school. It has been
urged that the facilities for h'ospital
work and experience have been neg-
ligible in Ann Arbor, and that the
many hospitals in Detroit would offer
a splendid field for experience, and
training under the great practitioners
of a larger city.
In view of the fact that many states
do not allow medical graduates to
practice, without a year's experience
in some large hospital, the action
seems to have been advisedly taken
for the progressive standard of the
Medical school. The University of
Minnesota, confronted with a large
problem a short titne ago, obtained the
permission of the heads' of the Mayo
hospital in Rochester, Minn., to use
their hospital as a graduate school.
Dean Vaughn Pleased
Dean Vaughan of the Medical school
(Continued on Page Six.)

.

'

HEAR

I

YOUR OPPOUTUNTIY TO ATTEND

HEAR

Geoge Innes
J. K. Birge

Student Volunteer Conerence

Mrs. B. Mon'gmery
Mrs. R. R. McClure

Sessions at 8:30 -10:30, 1:30 and 7 today

Sessions at 9,3 and 6:30 tomorrow

H. Lewis

Evening sessions in Methodist church, others in Lane Hall

In "
furs. Mary Curtis

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