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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 22, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ANNOUNCING OUR EXHIBIT
Spring and Summer Sultings
American and Foreign Sources in Artistic and Striking Designs
YOUR INSPECTION INVITED

G. H. Wild Company

Merchant Tailors

STATE STREET

Untiversity
NEXTF BOOKS
New grid8socoridheeand
lie Slater Book Shop

STOP AT
UT T L ES
338 S. STATE
sodas and lunches
DRGE BISCHOFF'
LOR IS
Cut Flowers and Plants
pin St. Ann Arbor, Mich.
PHONE 809 M

Rowe City Laundry
406 Detroit St
Cash cards save you money
PHONE 457-M
FIRST NATL. BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MIGHI
Capital $xoo,ooo Surplus and Profit $65,ooo
DIRECTORS
Wirt Cornwell Waldo M. Abbott
Geo. W. Patterson Harry M. Hawley
S. W. Clarkson Harrison Soule
Fred Schmid D. B. Sutton
E, D. Kinnie

Official newspaper at the University of
Mi gan. Published every morning except
M .nday during the university year.
Entered at the Post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier $2. o; b mail, $3.o0.
Want-ad. stations: 6uarry'; Students' Sup-
ply Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Pones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2424"
Communications not to exceed 300 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker..........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church.............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn............... .City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald.... .. Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor
Marian Wilson............Women's Editor
Carleton W. Reade.......Statistical dite-
J. E. Cam p bell...Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip Emery..Assistant Business Manager
Albert .Hone. . Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau. .. Assistant Business Manager
Fred M: Sutter. ..Assistant Business Manager
3. . SadeerNight Editors
S L. Stadeker E. L. Zeigler.
C. M.tickling H..Carey
B. A. Swaney L. W. Nieter.
L. S. Thompson E. A. Baumgarth'
Reporters
H. C. Garrison C. L. Roeser
C. S. Clark D. S. Rood
R. H. Fricken G. O. Brophy
B. 1. Millar F. A. Taber
D. H. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
K. L. Wehm eyer J. P. Hart
Annetta L.Wood J. C. Martin
T. F. McAllister Allan Shoenfield
Business Staff
Bernard Wohl J. E. Robinson
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Earl F. Ganschow
Walter R. Payne Jackson W. Smart
Harold R. Smith Seymour B. Wilson
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1917.
Night Editor-J. Schermerhorn, Jr.

c

NOTICE!
Students interested
in Spring or Summer
Vacation Work may
file their applications
with the "Y" Employ-
ment secretary now.
Office open from
3 to 6 p. m. daily.°

I q : X7 3
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, I

;'B111 ltl ll lll 1 iilllilil i llitl 1 1 l!l1Lillillli111 1 1l11llilllslli1litll lli1 11ili1 l:
MICHIGAN STVDENTS
We have what you want and the kind of service you desire.
e WUk
Loose Leaf Note Books-Lab Outfits, Aprons, Shop
Tools, etc., etc.
WA
VNIVER ITY Kq. U.&f -Eit S
:1 1 lll 1 1 1IllI It ll i l i lf li l i l l i il llilliilt1 1 1 1 1 1t 111 1 11 11 1 1 1 : i 9i i : l S : uld : 0 t 0

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...
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,

00

Carry a Large Assortment of Candies

We can Satisfy Your Taste
A TRIAL WILL CONVINCE YOU

The Fountain of Youth
State Street Cor. Liberty

We Offer You
ITY - - SERVICE- -LOCATION
esources $3, 8ooooo
Arbor SavingsB ank
Incorporated 1869
)ffice--
hwest Corner Main and Huron
1 Offiee-
07 North University Ave.
mers & MechenIcs Bank
s the Best in Modern Banking
IRITY - - - EFFICIENCY
and, P1gant Quarters. You Will
With Our Service. Two Offices
Main St. : : 330 S. State St.
UARBOWLI
109 S. Main St.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Cars run on Eastern time, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:35 a.
m., 8:xo a. in. and hourly to 7:1o p. in., 9:1o
P. M.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. m and
every two hours to 6:48 p. in.; to Lansing,
8:48 P. nM.
JAckrb Express Cars-(Local stops west of
r)-:48 a. m. and every two hours
to 7-:48 P.ini.
Local Cars Eastbound-5:35 a. m, 6:4a a
m., 7:og a. m. and every two hours-to 7:05 p.
$:5 p. m., 9:05 p. m., 10:50 p. in. to
Ypsilanti only, 9:2o4a. i., 9:5o a. in., 2:05 p
W., 6:o p. mn., 11 :45 P. in., i :ro a. in., 1 :2t
a. mL 'oSaline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound-6:o5 a. in., y :So a.
i., 10:20 p. M.. 2:20 a. M.
® Taes. Pictures
Develops Films
makes Prints
and Enlarge-
UjNIVEPRSITY
'The University of Chicago
S]UME i addition to'resident
[l jy work.offers also instruc-
STUDY toa by correspondence.
For detailed in-
formation address I
84th Year U. dC.(Di.H), Map, 1D. an
Extension Lectures

SPECIAL
LIGHT

SUNDAES
LUNCHES

)ur candles are made in
ur own sanitary shop.

OUR ATHLETIC CRISIS
Michigan's board in control of ath-
letics will meet today to ratify fresh-
man schedules. It has been rumored
that they will take up the conference
ouestion. We hope that the board will
take definite steps to re-enter the wes-
tern intercollegiate conference as a
solution to the present athletic crisis
which Michigan faces.
We now have no definite athletic
status, either in the east or in the
west. We do not engage in a.. sport
with our natural rivals. These are the
chief factors we believe in the ath-
letic slump which Michigan has suf-
fered during the past few years.
Michigan withdrew from the confer-
ence in 1908, because it did not care
to abide by the reform rules passed
in that body, and protested particu-
larly against the retroactive, three-
year rule which hit Michigan hardest
because at that time it had a number
of track and football stars who would
have been made ineligible by the rule.
Since 1908 the breach caused by the
reform rules has narrowed. At pres-
ent there are but few differences be-
tween the conference code and our
athletic regulations, and consequently
our athletic organization would need
but very slight modifications to con-
form exactly with the western rules.
Faculty control of athletics and the
training table are the chief points of
difference at present. In order to con-
form with the conference code, all that
would be necessary would be to place
a veto power in athletic matters in the
hands of some group of the faculty,
the senate council possibly. This dif-
ference in the make-up of the athletic
organization is negligible, because the
board in control as at present con-
stituted would remain in charge of
athletics. It is popularly believed that
in re-entering the conference Michi-
gan would have to give up the train-
ing table, but in as much as most
conference colleges maintain for their
teams some form of training table,
Michigan is not likely to suffer from
the training table rule.
Michigan will not have to swallow
its pride in re-entering the conference.
The advantages will be mutual. The
conference will have in its member-
ship another big university, and
Michigan will have competition with
natural rivals.
We think that a majority of Michi-
gan students, faculty, and alumni be-
lieve that Michigan should re-enter
the conference and in so doing resume
athletic relations with our old natural
rivals in the west.
It is up to the board in control and
the regents.

a realization of tragic possibilities, do
not let their patriotism wain.
We are confident that in this pres-
ent international crisis, Mr. Hamill
has a vital message to Michigan stu-
dents.
J-LIT CLASS MEETINGS
Less than 30 members of the J-lit
class met yesterday in response to a
call for a meeting to nominate a stu-
dent councilman. While class matters
are in many cases subject to other
affairs, it is distinctly a dishonor to
the 1918 lits that they cannot appear
in larger numbers for the choice of a
member of the Student council.
Another meeting will be held on Fri-
day in room 101 economics building,
at which time the present president of
the class will hand in his resignation,
The councilman will be nominated and
elected, and another president select-
ed. In view of the events to take
place, the University has a right to
expect that there will be at least a
quorum of J-lits present.
SAYS IF HE HAS SOLUTION OF
WAR PROBLEMS HE SHOULD DIS-
CLOSE IT.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
If, as Mr. John B. Robinson says, he
can tell us the real remedy for war,-
if he can tell us the real solution,-
I thing that it is his duty to his coun-
try to come forward and do so and not
hide behind the paltry excuse that
"our minds are not yet ready."
E. D. A.
Deutscher Verein Will Meet Today
A general meeting of the Deutscher
Verein will be held in the Verein
rooms at 7:30 o'clock Thursday. Im-
portant business will be taken up. Im-
mediately after the meeting the first
of a series of illustrated lectures will
be given in room 205 University hall.
Miss Nona McAdoo to Marry Russian
Washington, Feb. 21.-Secretary of
the Treasury McAdoo announced to-
day the engagement of his daughter,
Nona Hazelhurst McAdoo, to Ferdin-
and D'Mohrenachilde, second secre-
tary of the Russian embassy here.

PHONE 294

Vo-,
RA

LANE RS
0R
FLOWERS

3 U
MART Alecs may be all rigi? but
for a good, honest workin' 1 ,-ner
13 give me a man that's got his 13sowy n'naurll.o
slowly an natura
VELVET gets its good-a A
ness thatway-twoyears
natural ageing.

I-

Member of Florists' Telegraph
Delivery Service
Flowers by Wire to All th~e World.

.1

Leave your DULL Safety Razor
Blades to be SHARPENED with
William W. Behringer
11 NICKELS ARCADE

-----

WOMEN®
MWAWMNMMMM .

.....omm

a

MASQUES TO GIVE PLAY FOR
WOMEN'S LEAGUE ONIMARCH 23
Masques decided at its last monthly
meeting to give a play under its aus-
pices for the Women's league, March
23, a plan which was started last
year. The tr, -outs for the play will
be open to all the women on th6
campus, the date and place to be an-
nounced later. A small sketch wil
also be given by the members of

Masques, March 22, for the benefit of
the Women's Social club of Ann Arbor.
CLARENCE ZEWADSKI, '16L, OF
FLORIDA, WEDS DETRG1T GIRL
Clarence B. fewadski, '14, '16L, of
Ocala, Florida, ,was married last night
to Miss 'lazel Medbury of Detroit.
Zewadski, who is a member of the Sig-
ma Nu fraternity, is practicing law in
"r' '-

213 E.I

Liberty St.

Prof. Robert M. Wenley
on "Changing America"
night in Grand Ledge.

will speak
tomorrow

The Lad's "Batting" Record

a typewriter from
D. MORRILL'
322 South State Street
rill furnish you an instruction
free of charge. You will be a
t before you know it.
Women
ew tickets for the cotillion to beI
by the department of physical
tion tomorrow evening are still
led for at the office of the physi-
irector.
or women will entertain the
mores from 3 to 5 o'clock this
oon at Newberry hall.
n to Replace Men in Army
don, Feb. 21.-Military author-
are said to be developing a
e by which women will be sub-
ed for men in a number of non-
tant posts in the army, both in
Britain and France, such as
ig, canteen work, storekeeping
lerical work, thereby releasing
ands of men. The Express says
aready 30,000 women are em
Sin army work as cooks, wait-
motor drivers and similar oc-
ons, but the new scheme will
vacancies for many thousands.
alarm clocks are good clocks.
nan, Jeweler, 113 South Main
tues-eod

"Why the American's Dollar Is
Shrinking" is the subject on which
Prof. G. W. Dowrie will lecture tomor-
row night in Flushing.
Prof. J. R. Brumm will speak in
Armada tomorrow night on "The
Escape from the Commonplace."
"The University of Michigan and the
Youth of Michigan" is the subject on
which Prof. A. G. Hall will speak in
Morenci tomorrow night.
Prof. R. W. Hegner will lecture to-
morrow night in Freemont on "The
Economic Importance of Birds."
Mr. W. W. Bishop, University li-
brarian, will give the dedication ad-
dress for the Hilsdale college library
at Hilsdale tomorrow afternoon.
Prof. Max Winkler will lecture in
Pontiac tomorrow night on "Goethe."
Prof. T. E. Rankin will lecture in
Wayne tomorrow night on "Five
Points in Americanism."
Prof. R. W. Sellars will lecture in
Carson City tomorrow night on "Fu-
ture Democracy."
Prof. W. B. Hinsdale will lecture in;
New Baltimore tomorrow on "Princi-
pal Men of Michigan."

,.TA-M-

1716 Heels

1 on
1916 Fe

I

You wear a 1916 hat, a 1916
suit.
But you wear 1716 heels if you
wear leather heels.
You drive a 1916 car, use 1916
office or shop equipment, live
in a 1916 house.
But your leather heels are out
of date.
Leather heels are as obsolete
as mustache cups, celluloid
dickeys and powdered peri-
wigs. They aren't adaptable
to modern conditions.
This is the day of rubber
heels. They are individual
sh ockabsorbers-spine savers
-that make the hardest pave-
ments as soft as a Brussels
carpet.
They are made for 1916 pave.
ments.
Bring your heels up-to-date.
Wear O'Sullivan's Heels of
New Live Rubber.
When you buy your new shoes, buy
them O'Sullivanized.
Insist on WSullivanized shoes; the
new live rubber heels give the great-
est wear with the greatest resiliency:
coppright, ISS, 0's. R. Co.
9

was bad, says
the note from
Prexy to Papa
-whichreferred
of course to the
"bats" that de-
stroy the body
and break down
the thinking
machinery. The
only cureis back
to the simple
life and

".
r
A
+v M
tir...
. _ '

ABOUT 90 MEN ALREADY SIGNED
FOR 1917 CAMP DAVIS SESSION
About 90 men have signed up thus
far for the work at Camp Davis next
summer. Of this number the majority
are junior civil engineers. There are
also a few junior foresters. The men
will report at Camp Davis the Saturday
following Commencement, and work
will begin the next Monday.
Alarm clocks, $1.00 up. Chapman,
Jeweler, 113 South Main St. tues-eod
Try a Michigan Daily Want Ad.

THE WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY
MESSAGE
"Patriotism and International Rela-1
tions" is the subject of the address
which Mr. Hamill of Chicago will de-
liver this morning. We wish that every
student in the University might be
present to hear this address at 10
o'clock in room B of the law building.
We who live in the middlewest are
apt to allow our conception of -patri-
otism and international relations to be
dimmed by the snuggness and appar-
ent security of our location, while
those on the seaboard, kept alert by

Shredded Wheat
the food that puts you on your feet when
everything else fails. A daily diet of
Shredded Wheat means clear thinking
and quick acting. It leaves the body
strong and buoyant and the brain in
condition to tackle the problems of study
or play. It is on the training table of
nearly every college and university
in, this country and Canada. Two
Shredded Wheat Biscuits with milk
or cream supply more real body-
building nutriment than meat or eggs
at one-fourth the cost.

to measure. G. H. Wild
Merchant Tailors. State
tf

Made only by
The Shredded Wheat Company,

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