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February 22, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-22

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HE WEATHE;
PROBABLY SNOW
TODAY

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UNITED F

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PAY A-ND NIGHT
IVIRE SERVICE

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VOL. XXVII. No. 96. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1917. PRICE FIVE C

- _ .-

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CONSIDER REITURNi
TODAY'S__MEETING
ATHLETIC BOARD TO DISCUSS
RENEWAL OF RELATIONS
WITH "BIG NINE"
STUDENT MEMBERS OF
BOARD FAVOR RETURN

in

Judge J. 0. Murfin's Attitude Still
Doubt Following Alumni
Vote

Michigan's board in control of ath-
letics meets in special session at 1:30
o'clock this afternoon to register it-
self as either in favor oi or opposed
to a return to the western emference.
Director Bartelme states that the
hastily called meeting is for the pr-
pose of ratifying feshman schedules,
but the events of the past week point
to the conference question as the real
motive which prompts today's gat-er-
ing.
Faculty representatives of confer-
ence colleges met in Chicago last
week-eni and Chairman Aigler and
Vice-Cnairman Gram of the athletic
board were in the Windy City at the
same time. Director Bartelme ex-
plains that he journeyed to the same
destination to look up a basketball
coach. Immediately following the Chi-
cago gathering, notices of this after-
noon's meeting were sent out to board
members.
Something Big Coming Up.
If the mere ratification of yearling
schedules was the only thing on the
program the executive committee of
the athletic board, which has the prop-
er authority, could pass upon the busi-
ness at hand without the necessity of
calling a general meeting. With a
special session of the entire member-
ship of the board, something big must
be "in the wind."
What will be the attitude of Michi-
gan's athletic authorities if the looked-
for question does appear? Director
Bartelme and Chairman Aigler refuse
to say which way they would cast
their votes. One alumni member of
the board, J. O. Murfin of Detroit, has
at various times registered himself as
being opposed to a return to the west-
ern organization.
students Favor Return.
The three student members of the
board, who represent the campus,
stated last night that they could not
say definitely, that the conference sub-
ject would be broached today. They
do say, however, that they are in favor
of a return and will vote for it, If
such a resolution is presented.
Albert Stoll, '17L, Willis Brodhead,
'17E, and James Thomas, '18L, are the
voice of the student body in the delib-
erations of the board, and these men
believe that the campus is practically
unanimously in favor of a return to
the conference. Brodhead expressed
himself in these words: "Nineteen out
of every 20 men I have talked to are
in favor of a return to the conference.
There are some slight objections, and
it may hurt our pride a bit to admit
that we belong in the west instead of
the east, but the advantages we would
rain in vastly better competition com-
pletely offset the disadvantages."
No one knows better than Director
Bartelme and the chairman of the
board what difficulties havb been en-
countered in the past in arranging
even our totally unsatisfactory sched-
ules in al lines of sport, and though
these mer refuse to commit themselves
in advance rf today's session. It is not
hard to suppose that they would vote
in favor of returning to the west for
athletic competition. The other fac-
ulty members will probably be found
to coincide In view with the student
members
Competition Unsatisfactory.
'Two other alumni members, in ad-
dition to Judge Marfin, are to be con-
sidered. James Duffy and John Hib-
bard have long been associated with
the athletic board and have heard nu-
merous discussions on the conference
question. These men cannot, however,
have been blind 'o the fact that pres-
ent Wolverine competition is not sat-
isfactory and something must be done.
The conference rules were never more
in line with Michigan's ideas of ath-
letic management than they are today
since the break in 1908, and it would

Hamill Talks at
Lawn Celebration
Chicago Lawyer Heads Washington's
Birthday Exercises
Today
Exercises in observance of Wash-
ington's birthday will be held from
10 o'clock until noon today in room
B of the law building. Mr. Charles H.
Hamill, a prominent lawyer from Chi-
cago, will be the principle speaker
with the subject: "Patriotism and In-
ternational Relations."
The room has been decorated with
American flags and portraits of Wash-
ington and other American statesmen.
Fisher's string trio will furnish the
music. The program will be as, fol-
lows:
The Stars and Stripes Forever"...
..... .......Fisher's trio
"America I Love You".... Fisher's trio
Address: '"Patriotism and Interna-
tional Relations."
"America."
These exercises are to be given
'nder the auspices of the Law school
,nd it Is expected that all students of
+his school will attend in a body. Ad-
nission is free and an invitation isI
-xtended to all students and faculties
of the University and the citizens of
Ann Arbor.
RECOGNIZES PERIL
OF U-BOAT WARFARE
1ir Edward Carson, in Speech to Com-
mns, Admits Loss of Many
Ships
London, Feb. 21.-England recog-
nizes the gravity of the German sub-
marine warfare. Her losses have been
bad, but not equal to the extrav-
agant bravado claimed by Germany.
They have totaled little more than the
'osses in previous months before the
ruthlessness was given full sway.
Sir Edward Carson, making his first
speech as the first lord of the ad-
miralty, voiced these beliefs today in
the house of commons. He cited fig-
ures which showed comparative losses
for December, January, and to Feb.
18, and asserted that there had been
40 fights with submarines since Feb.
1. The admiralty head, however, de-
clined to state how many German sub-
mersibles Great Britain had captured
or sunk.
Carson estimated there were 3,000
ships in the danger gone simultane-
ously. He then gave these compara-
tive totals of the number of ships lost:
Dec. 1 to Dec. 18, 118 ships, 223,222
tons.
UNION GIVES DINNER
Life, Yearly, Faculty Members and
Pledges Can Attend Banquet
Life, yearly, and faculty members of
the Michigan Union will be afforded
an opportunity to attend the first All-
Union membership dinner of the year,
at 6 o'clock Thursday night, March 1.
Tickets will be on sale at the Union
desk daily and will be sold on the
campus by 10 teams of committeemen.
The dinner is limited to 200.
Elmer C. Schacht, '18E, will serve as
general chairman for the ticket sale,
which will be carried on by the com-
mittees under the direction of the fol-
lowing chairmen: Wallace J. Piggott,
'18E, Raymond M. Langley,'18E, Waldo
McKee, '18E, Thomas F. McAllister, '18,
Lawrence Heustis, '17P, Norman H.

1 Ibsen, '18E, Cecil C. Andrews, '18, W.
Starrett Dinwiddie, '18E, Alan V. Liv-
ingston, '18E, and George L. Ohr-
strom, '19L.
NATION WILL BE DRY BY 1920
SAYS HOBSON IN LECTURE

Dr. Brooks Speaks
to Jiedics Today

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Gives Principal Address at Annual
Founder's Day Meet-
ing
Dr. Henry Harlow Brooks, '95M, will
be the principal speaker at'the four-
teenth annual Founder's day celebra-
tion of the Medical school to be held
at 8 o'clock this evening in Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall.
The program for the evening will
be a selection by the orchestra of the
Medical school; remarks ┬░on the "Sig-
nificance of Founder's Day," by Dean
Victor C. Vaughan; an address by Dr.
H. H. Brooks on "Medicine and the
American Indian," and "Gondallied,"
by an instrumental trio consisting of
Miss Johnson, harp; Mr. Johnson, vio-
lin 'celo, and Mr. Breidenbach, violin.
Following the program, the students
of the Medical school and members of
the faculty and their wives will at-
tend a reception in the ladies' parlors
of the Barbour gymnasium. Receiving
will be done by President Harry B.
Hutchins and Mrs. Hutchins, Dean
Victor C. Vaughan and Mrs. Vaughan,
Dr. H. H. Brooks, and Regent W. H.
Sawyer. A dance in Barbour gymnas-
ium will conclude the entertainment.
STUDENT MEETINGS
TO OPEN TOMORROW

16

CONFIDENT ATHLET
WITH COACH AND
MANAGER

ALL WHO PLACED IN
NOTRE DAME MEET
Top-heavy List of Dash Events Is
pected to Swing
Meet

t _

I

Sixteen
by Coach

track athletes accom
Farrell and Manager

TRACK TEAM SEE
VICTORY AHEAD01
VARSITY DEPAF

FEDERAL TRADE BODYl
TO RUSH FOOD PROBE
WILL NOT WAIT FOR $400,000 AP-
PROPRIATION FROM CON-
GRESS
Washington, Feb. 21.-Declaring the
food situation constitutes "one of the
gravest problems of the day" the fed-'
eral trade commission announced to-
day it will not wait for the $400,000
appropriation from congress, to probe
charges of extortionate food prices.
The commission began today the
actual preliminaries of the probe. It
is said Francis J. Heney who forced
the newsprint paper manufacturers in-
to line will have charge of the com-
mission's investigation.
Coincidental with these facts com-
ing to light, that body received as-
surances from many large packers of
the country that they are willing to
co-operate in every way with the com-
mission. The packers wrote that their
books will be thrown open to that
body.
Representative Denounces Conditions
Washington, Feb. 21.-Representa-
tive Meyer London of New York, a So-
cialist, today demanded on the floor
of the house that congress take up
his food 'control bill and relieve the
thousands of starving people in New
York. During the debate on the army
bill London declared the situation in
New York to be unbearable.
Says Scarcity Chargeable to Railroads
Chicago, Feb. 21.-The warning of
"danger of riot and anarchy through-
out the land," because of the food
shortage attributed to the railroad
congestion was given to officials of all
eastern railroads today, by James P.
Griffin, president of the Chicago board
of trade. The interstate commerce
commission as official federal body
with power to move food stuffs in a
national emergency, was alsa notified
of impending trouble by President
Griffin.
"Despite your assurances," Griffin's
message read, "no relief has been af-
forded to move food and grains out of
Chicago. The present scarcity of sup-
plies, bordering on famine is many
communities,, with the consequent in-
flation of values, is directly charge-
able to the railroads."

FRANCK GIVES LECTURE
ON TRAVELS IN SOUTHi

WANDERER LECTURES TO
THAN 1,000 PERSONS
HILL AUDITORIUM

MORE
IN

State Volunteer Meeting to Be
in Lane Hall from 3 to 6
O'clock

Held

Intimate glimpses of South America,
and especially the countries of Co-
lombia, Ecuador and Peru were given
last night to more than one thousandi
persons who heard Harry A. Franck,7
'03, give his lecture, "Afoot Through
South America." The lecture was il-
lustrated by 150 hand-colored slides
portraying unusual bits of scenery,{
ruined cities, and queer characters en-1
countered by Mr. Franck during his
four years of traveling in South
America.
For the most part the lecture was,
confined to his journey of one yeara
which took him from Colombia along,
the old Incas' highway to Cuzco, the
ancient capital of the Incas. Mr.3
Franck was obliged to make the trips;
alone.
Many interesting views of the cus-1
toms and habits of the people were
shown, an instance of which was the
feminine custom of wearing large hats
which they tipped when meeting a
white person. "Eggs were most dif-
ficult to procure," said Mr. Franck.
"Nearly every shop displayed them for
sale, but for some unknown reason
they seemed quite reluctant to sell
them. Usually I merely gathered up
all I wanted, and then inquired the
price, thus ending the matter."
During the trip lasting 1,461 days,
Mr. Franck said that he slept in 571
different spots, the word spot being
used advisedly, as any other word
would be deceiving.
Y. W. C. A. CABINET GIVES SUPPER
TO ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS
Twenty places were laid for the
supper given last night by the Y. W.
C. A. cabinet in honor of their advisory
board. The tables were lighted by
candles, and place cards and favors
were appropriate to the time of year.
Impromptu after-dinner speeches
were called for, and several of the
guests and hostesses responded. On
March 14 a similar affair'will be held,
when members of the advisory board
act as hostesses for the cabinet mem-
bers.
ANNOUNCE BIRTH OF SON
TO MR. AND MRS. BURNELL

Rev. W. J. Van Kersen, secretary of
the Dutch Reform church; Mr. J. K.
Birge, head of the Moslem department
of International college; Mr. James
H. Lewis, son of Bishop Lewis of
China, and Mr. C. F. Angell, expert
on rural community work, are some
of the speakers and leaders who will,
be in Ann Arbor tomorrow for the
opening meetings of the state student
volunteer convention.
Those wishing to attend the sessions
of this convention should sign at Lane
hall between the hours of 3 and 6
o'clock tomorrow.
Entertainment for out-of-town dele-
gates is not adequately provided for,
at the present time, and those who,
can entertain one or more persons for
the two nights of the conference are
asked to call 2017 or 406-J.
TWO COLLEGES DROP HONOR
SYSTEM AFTER SMALL VOTE
Reports concerning the results of
the honor system which was given its
first trial in the literary college dur-
ing the mid-year examinations have
been received 'by Dean J. R. Effinger
from the various faculty members in
whose. classes the system was tried.
These reports have not been, checked
up completely as yet, but those which
have been examined seem to show that
this first trial has proved successful.
The question, of the honor system
in the architectural college was sub-
mitted to a student referendum. Only
60 of the votes cast were affirmative
and the faculty has decided to drop
the matter since so few of the stu-
dents favored the installation of the
system.
The same question was voted upon
in the dental college and carried by
a small majority. As a result of this
small majority in favor of the sys-
te'n the faculty decided against the
installation of the honor system.
PRESIDENT WILSON SEES
FRIENDS IN CENTRAL AMERICA
Washington, Feb. 21.-The United
States may soon need "all the friends
we can attach to us in Central Amer-
ica," President Wilson wrote in a let-
ter to Senator Stone recently urging
immediate ratification of the Colom-

ers left at 8:38. o'clock last night
the Michigan Central for Syrac
where they will engage in mortal a
bat with the thinly-clad youths
resenting the Orange university
light. Confidence ran high in
team when they left, all the:
0rmly believing that the Wolve
aggregation will come home with
Methodists' scalp dangling beside
of the Catholics at its belt.
Every man who won a place in
Notre Dame meet was taken on
trip. In addition Robinson, Fonta
Fox, Huntington, and Hardel we
their way to the Pullman. The s
is heavily equipped with short dist
men, six of the 16 athletes being q
ter-milers and dashmen. Victor
defeat in the meet will rest largel:
these men's shoulders, as four ev
of this sort will be run, the 50-
dash, the 300-yard dash, the qua
mile, and the relay.
Bowzer Strong Dash Man.
One Syracuse speedster who
cause considerable trouble for
Wolverines if he lives up to his I
of two years ago is Bower,
sprinter of the 1915 Orange sq
The 'colored lad was the fastest
the Methodists possessed that ,
but was prevented from clashing'
Michigan by an accident just be
the meet.
Three members of last fall's S
cuse football team will perform in
shot-put for the easterners. The t
men are Captain Babe White, Capi
elect Al Cobb, and Segal, all toile
the ponderous Orange forward wa
The Entry List.
Following are the entries:
40-yard dash-Michigan: O'B
Scofield, and Robinson; Syrac
Brown, R. Dixon, McClellan, A'
Cerow, Williams, Irving, Dawson,
Bowzer.
300-yard dash-Michigan: O'B
Scofield, and Robinson; Syrat
Brown, R. Dixon, McClellan, A
Cerow, Williams, Irving, Da
Bowzer, and H. Dixon.
440-yard dash-Michigan: Font
Huntington, and Hardell; Syra
Peterson, Newkirk, R. Nixon, D
Cerow, Wileams, Clark, Garey,
zer, Malone, H. Dixon.
880-yard run-Michigan: Ca
Fox, and Bouma; Syracuse: New
Peterscn. Heffernon, Watson, Ge
Williams, and Garey.
Mile run -Michigan: Carroll, I
wick, and Bouma; Syracuse: Pete
Newkirk, Heffernon, Watson, Ge
Soule, H. C. White, Dekay, Gare3
60-yard hurdles-Michigan: Be
ley; Syracuse: Brown, Lange, A
Stech, Ellis.
Pole vault--Michigan: Kesler: A
ci.se: Bomgardner, Clapp, Schull
High jump-Michigan: Simi
Haigh; Syracuse: Folz, Murphy, C
Steele, Ellis, Bomgardner.
Shot put-Michigan: Cross, Si
syracuse: Schultz, Cobb, H. A. V
Newberry, Segal.
Relay-To be picked from abov
tries.

DEWEY
. ON

LECTURES
WASHINGTON

Detroit Attorney Wil Discuss
well Address of Wash.
ington

Fare-

i Mr. and Mrs. Max R. Burnell an-I

That the dry forces of the nation
dominate the situation and that na-
tional prohibition will be in force in
1920, was the assertion of Captain
Richard Hobson in his address in the
Presbyterian church last night. He
declared that 40 state legislatures have
pledged themselves to support dry
measures.
World prohibition was also pro-
phecied as a possibility within the next
few years. The action of the nations
involved in the European war of either
abolishing the liquor traffic or cur-
tailing it greatly was pointed out as

Fred G. Dewey, '02, Detroit attorney,
will speak on "Washington's Message
to 1917," in the high school auditorium
under the auspices of the Sons of the
American Revolution, at 8:15 o'clock
tonight.
In the address, Mr. Dewey will dis-
cuss the principles advanced by Wash-
ington in his farewell address and ap-
ply them to the conditions today.
Rev. George W. Knepper, chairman
of the membership committee of .the
Ann Arbor division of the American
Red Cross which was organized in this
city yesterday, will make some import-'
ant announcements regarding the op-

nounce the arrival of a son. Mr.
Burnell, '18M, is the son of Dr. B. E.
Burnell of Flint. Mrs. Burnell was
formerly Miss Irma Auerbach of Oak-
land, Cal. The couple are making
their home at 509 Linden street.
PROMINENT ANN ARBOR MEN
APPEAR IN "DEESTRICK SKULE"
The "Deestrick Skule," with an all-
star cast of University professors and
prominent Ann Arbor people, will be
given in the high school auditorium
at 8 o'clock next Tuesday, instead of
Thursday night.

bian treaty.
In making public the letter with tbe
president's approval Senator Stone,
chairman of the foreign relations com-
mittee, stated it would be useless to
attempt to obtain ratification at this
session. Republicans, he pointed out,
are practically solid in opposition and
sufficient in numbers to defeat the
necessary two-thirds vote.
CHANGE TIME OF WASHINGTON
PARTY TO BE HELD TODAY
The time of the annual law Wash-
ington birthday dance, to be held at
the Union this afternoon, has been
changed from 2 to 2:30 o'clock.

TO ENTERTAIN INSTITUTE C]
OF YPSILANTI SATURDAY, F]
Announcement was made yest
that the Ferris Institute club <
University will entertain the Ins
club of Ypsilanti at the Uni
church parlors Saturday evening
24, instead of Friday. All former
bers of the Ferris Institute are I
to attend the entertainment.
No Change in Local ' Coal Sit
The coal shortage, which is (
the schools in Detroit and c
considerable trouble in many
Michigan cities, is no worse her
it was last week.

encouraging move in this direction. 1 eration of the organization.

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