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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 18, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OUR EXHIBIT

Spring and Summer Sultings
American and Foreign Sources in Artistic and Striking Designs
YOUR INSPECTION INVITED

G. H.
ig Merchant Tailors

Wild Company
STATE STREET

-------

Grade TOOLS for WOOD and

FORGE SHOPS

H. L. SWITZ E R CO.

ARE

301 State St.

SPORTING GOODS

wi-
mp

University
TEXT BOOKS
Nowewand Secondhand

he Slater Book Shop

i

new shoes are stitched with Goodyear Welt machines.
use same machines for repair work. We believe we
ve the most modern equipped shoe repair shop in Ann
bor. You'll get high class work and courteous treatment
this shop and we think you'll find us worthy of patron-
. Our call and deliver service is at your disposal. Use it,
Famous Shoe Repairing Co.,
IONE 807 301 S. State St.

Official newspaper at the University of
Mi'agan. Published every morning except
M.>day during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier $250; by mail, $.00.
Want ad. stations: duarry'; Students' Sup-
7Store; The Deltar. State and Packard.
P'ones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 244.
Communications not to exceed S3o words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:3 o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker..........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church.......... ...News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn...... ........City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald.........Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson. Telegraph Editor
Marian Wilson...............Women's Editor
Carleton W. Read.........Statistieal Editor
J. E. Campbell...Assistant Business Manager
Philip Emery..Assistant Business Manager
Albert E. Horn...Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau... Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter...Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
LE. L. Zeigler
C. M. jickling H. M. Carey
B. A. Swaney L. W. Nieter
L. S. Thompsn E. A. Baumgarth
Reporters
HC C.GaronCL. Roeser
C. S. Clark D. S. Rood.
R. H. Fricken G. O. Broph
B. I. Millar F. A. Taber
D. H. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
K. L. Wehmeyer J. P. Hart
Annetta L. Wood J. C. Martin
T. F. McAllister Allan Shoenfield
Business Staff
Bernard Woh J. E. Robinson
Paul E. Colette Harry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Earl F. Ganschow
Walter R. Payne Jackson W. Smart
Harold R. Smith Seymour B. Wilson
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1917.
Night Editor-C. I. Jickling
CO-OPERATING WITH THE HONOR
COMMITTEE.
It is impossible to draw any con-
clusions at present regarding the suc-
cess or failure of the honor system in
the literary college, where it was in-
formally adopted during the last final
examinations. We must know what
proportion of the classes elected to
use the system, how faithfully it was
adhered to, and how efficiently the stu-
dent honor committee carries out its
disciplinary work.
The honor committee has made an
appeal to all students who took exam-
inations under the honor system to re-
port all violations of the system. The
committee desires to make its work
thorough, and makes its appeal on the
theory that a student who will cheat
in an honor examination should re-
ceive no more consideration from his
fellow-students than does any dis-
honest or law-breaking citizen.
In following the committee's wishes,
and carrying out his own pledge we
do not think that a student is any more
of a "tattle-tale" than the citizen who
swears out a warrant for the man that
has burgled his house. We also be-
lieve that there are few students who
will cheat in an honor examination.
But we hope that students will co-
operate with the honor committee, i
reporting any violations of the honor
code.

rr- t rre-r s- ~ mm? mro a mm a

ic

.-

UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
10:30-The God of the Individual:-
Does "He" or "It" Care for a Man?
Address by Mr. Loring.
11:45-The Farmer and The High Cost
of Living. Address before the Social
Service Class by Mr. H. G. Burn-
ham.
6:30-Education in India. Address by
Dr. Hardikar before the Students'
Society. The public invited.

ANNOUNCEMENT

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO.

COMMENT ON THE
INTERNATIONAL CRISIS
OTHER NEUTRIAL NATIONS.
Denmark, Sweden and Norway have
taken the same position in respect to
Germany's submarine ruthlessness
that President Wilson has declared
for the United States. In their identic
note the Scandinavian powers, de-
nouncing the subarine "blockade" as
without warrant of law, "formally pro-
test against the measures taken by
Germany and Austria-Hungary and
make all reservations with regard to
the loss of human lives and to ma-
terial damage which may result from
them."
In terms and in effect this is prac-
tically identical with the president's
statement that if Germany carries her
threat into execution he would go be-
fore congress "to ask that authority
be given him to use any means that
may be necessary for the protection
of our seamen and our people .in the
prosecution of their peaceful and legi-
timate errands on the high seas. I
can do nothing less. I take it for
granted that all neutral governments
will take the same course."
The express reservation of the Scan-
dinanvian powers with regard to loss
of life and property unmistakably
means that they, too, will take meas-
ures to protect their interests. Under
the menace of German invasion and
punishment Holland, naturally, can
take no determined stand. Denmark,
Sweden and Norway appear to have
given their full support to the presi-
dent's action. Their history of pro-
tests against German outrage is short-
er than ours. We have had pledges
and promises, now broken, which ap-
pear to be lacking in their case; they
have not yet come to the stage of
breaking relations with Germany.
Their note means that the rupture will
come if provocation is given, and that
they will defend themselves.-The
New York Times.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
* ~

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
At 10:30 A. M.
Mr. Douglas will
preach on
"THE PIONEERS"

-'V VWNW Vt'u'C9' /tWWt/l'tO,'9/

-""""""""'"""""""""""""'"""""""""""" """""""""""""""""
MICHIGAN STVDENTS
We have what you want and the kind of service you desire. =
Text ooks
Loose Leaf Note Books-Lab Outfits, Aprons, Shop
Tools, etc., etc.
VNIVERSITY BOOKSTOIRES
ill I11111111111111U11111111111111111111111lilI1!1111111111111111111611111111111111 tliii t 1 1ll

i

That Cough
will cease its
Nagging Way
when you allowf
PINE BALSOM MENTHOL
- and -
EUCALYPTUS
a closer intimacy

If You Seek
For unvarying quality in Men's
Wear you will find satisfaction at
THE
Varsity Toggery
SHOP
1107 S. University St.

I

Take your Amateur Finishing

TO

QUARRY DRUG CO'S.
Prescription Store
Cor. State & N. University

CH off a few
minutes and eat some of
GEORGE'S SUEY
WA RING LoC

DAiINS

Gives you the best Tailoring service
to be obtained anywhere in the coun-
try, coupled with a wonderful line
of Woolens.

19

3$4 S. State St.,

Ph, ne 1244-M

RPHEUM THEATRE
MATINEE TICKETS

t06 E. Huron Street

Opposite Court House

FREE

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO.

with each job ok a Dollar or more at
FRED H. RICE, Shoe Shop

.r1

We Offer You
CURITY - -SERVICE- - LOCATION
Resources $3,8ooooo
no Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
in Office-
orthwest corner Main and Huron
inch Offie.--
707 North University Ave.
Farmers & Mechanics. Bank
difers the Best in Modern Banking
;ECURITY.. . EFFICIENCY
lent and Pleasant Quarters. You Will
sed with Our Service. Two offices
5 S. Main St. : : 330 S. State St.
PLAI N
EP SU EY-25c
AFTER 2-30c
112-2 Special steaks & chops
. kinds American Style
short orders
Will open 11 a. m. to 1 a. m.
hgan Inn 611 E. Liberty
Telephone 948-R
a typewriter from
D. MOR'RILL
322 South State Street
ill furnish you an instruction
free of charge. You will be a
before you know it.
ir Repairing Is Neatly Done

DETROIT UNITED LINES,
3etween Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
a rs run oaEastern time, one hour faster
than local tirme.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:35 a.
nm., .:1o a. m. and hourly to 7:10 p. m., 9:10
p. m.
Kaleazoo Limited Cars-8:49 a. m and
every two hours to 6:48 p. m.; to Lansing,
8:44 P. in,.
Jackson Express Cars-(Loca stoaps west of
Ann: Arbor)-9:48 a. mn. and every two hours
to 7-:48 P.in.
Local Cars Eastbound--:35 a. m,, 6:40 a.
w, y :ofl a. m. and every two hours to 7:05 p.
n, 3:0A p,i m., 9:05 p. m., 10:50 p. m. to
ypsilantl oi.Oy, 9:20 a. . u, 9:soa. in., 2:05 p.
sor., 6:05 P. In., 11:45 P. im., x : xeoa. im., z1: 2
a. ta. To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound-6:o5 a. m., 7:5 a.
M., 3*:ao p. M.. 12:20 a. M.
. TakesPictures
R1Develops Films
makes Prints0
and Enlarge-
713 E. VNIVECRSITY
IOOd - a"C Alarm Clocks
SCHAND SEYF $1.00 up
113 1IERTgy BIE T $ . - p
Fountain Pens-
Waterman and Conklin
U; of M. Jewelry
Schlanderer & Seyfried
MODERN BARBER SHOP
332 State St.
A Particular Place
for Particular People.
FRANK C. BOLICH Props
wuomen
There will be an important meeting
of the executive board of the Inde-
pendent Girls' club at 7 o'clock Mon-
day evening at the home of Dean Myra
B. Jordan, 1215 Hill street.
Tickets for the Independent Girls'
club dance, to be given Saturday even-
ing in Barbour gymansium, can be
obtained from members of the execu-
tive board or at Wahr's book store.
Tryouts for the junior play will be
continued at 5 o'clock Monday after-
noon Girls who are to try out a
second time for parts in the cast will
be notified to meet Monday at 4 o'clock.

PHONE 2428

329 S. MAIN

THE SCIENCE OF NOTE-TAKING.
Like the stenographer who concen-
trates all of her attention upon words,
the average note-taker in the lecture
course attempts to get every word of
the lecture verbatiL
Note-taking is a science. It is a
science based upon judgment and gov-
erned by close attention. Just what is
extraneous and what is the gist must
be determined by close attention; sub-
ordination of material must be ar-
ranged by exercise of judgment.
The student who gives his closest
attention, jotting down only dates and
statistics, gets more out of a course
than the person who covers pages
with notes. The latter often misses
the predominant message in the lec-
ture while trying to get mer.. words,
and when preparing for an examine-
tion, finds it hard to separate what is
important from what is superficial.
Close mental attention is vastly to be
prefered to attention to words; the
result of such attention will be much
morebeneficial than a collection of
closely written pages which must be
studied and studied again before the
reviewer can get'out the real meaning
of the lecture.
Senior Lits Hold Basketball Practice
All candidates for the senior lit
basketball team are urged to report
for the first practice tomorrow night
at 7:30 o'clock in Waterman gym. Ir
case any man who is interested and it
desirous of coming out yet cannot re-
port tomorrow call Stanly Smith at
phone 357.
He who pays cash deserves discount.
We give it in cash-coupons. Davis, at
119 Main. 13-17-18

*PROPER ETIQUETTE FOR
HANGING OUT THE FLAG
*
* When hanging out the flag, sev-
* eral points of etiquette should be
* observed.
* 1. Remember that the flag
* when flown on north and south
* streets must hang with 'the blue
* field toward the east, and on east
* and west streets must hang with
* the blue field toward the north.
* 2. The flag should never be al-
* lowed to fly all night. On taking
* it down the folds should never be
* allowed to touch the ground.
* 3. When colors are passing
* as in parade those spectators who
* are walking are required to stand
* and people sitting are required to
* rise.
* 4. Schools in Michigan are com-
* pelled to have a flag of good mater-
* ial and size displayed in a conspic-
* uous place and all rules regarding
* its positions are to be carefully
* observed.
* A new star is added to the flag
* for the entrance of a new state in
* in the Union. The addition is not
* made until the Fourth of July fol-
* lowing the entrance of the state.
* Manufacturers are not permitted
* to use trade marks on the mater-
* ial from which flags are made As
* a penalty for not following the
* proper etiquette with regard to
* the flag, a fine of not less than five
* days imprisonment and $25, or
* thirty days in the county jail may
* be imposed, according to the ser-
* iousness of the offense.
*

*
*
*
*
*
*

BOOKS WORTH REING
HYGIENE IN MEXICO( by Alberto J.
Pan!. G. P. 'Putnam's Sons. New
York. $1.50 net.
Now that the United States comes
more and more in contact with the
country of Mexico and its people, it is
well that we should know a little
about the real state of civilization now
present. It is also well that we should
be prepared before hand to meet the
conditions which are in existence.
It is for this that the book "Hygiene
in Mexico" is valuable. It contains a
close analysis of the situation such
as the causes of the unhealthfulness
of the public health in Mexico Qity,
physical characteristics of the medium,
temperature, and topography and ef-
ficient organization of the sanitary
administration, compulsory sanitation,
and the bearing of the government
upon the present sanitary conditions
of the country.
Though "Hygiene in Mexico" may
have an interest for those outside the
country, it is written primarily as an
appeal to the people of Mexico. The
author feels the pressing necessity
for better education of all the peo-
ple of Mexico and for a better civic
government management of national
hygiene.
"The true problem of Mexico con-
sists, therefore, in hygienizing the
population, physically and morally,
and endeavoring, by all available
means, to improve the precarious econ-
omical situation of our proletariat.
"The solution of the part of this
problem which concerns the depart-
ment of education and the municipal-
ities lies in the establishing and main-
taining the greatest possible number
of schools. And, finally, the country
must, before and above all, organize
its administration upon a basis of ab-
solute morality."
JESSIE DICKEKN HOSO,
Teacher of singing in Detroit Institute
of Musical Art, formerly teacher in
University School of Music, 1905-14,
will accept a limited number of pu-
pils Tuesdays and Fridays. Credit
will be given if desired in the Detroit
Institute of Musical Art. Ann Arbor
address 1702 Geddes avenue. Phone

OPPOSITE ORPHEUM

NOTICE

At its March meeting, the Board in
Control of Student Publications will
choose a business manager and man-
aging editor for the Wolverine, and a
business manager for the Athletic
Program. It is the policy of the board
in filling the positions on the publi-
cations under its control, to award
them on the basis of merit to those
who have served in minor positions on
the publications to which the posi-
tions pertain.
It sometimes happens, however, that
no one who has served on the publica-
tions during the year is eligible or
capable of filling one of the leading
positions for the ensuing year. When
such circumstances arise, the board
finds it necessary to consider out-
side candidates. This notice should
not be considered as an intimation
that these circumstances will arise
this year.
All applications for these positions
should be in the hands of , Professor
F. N. Scott, on or before February"28,
in order to be considered. Each appli-
cation should contain a statement -of
the experience of the applicant and
should be accompanied by the appli-
cant's eligibility card and and any
letters of recommendation which he
may have.
BOARD IN CONTROL OF
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS.
LAW MARKS ARE NOW ON WAY
Grades Reach Postoffice Too Late to
Be Delivered to Students
Yesterday
Still they wait and worry with no
visible signs of relief until tomorrow.
For a week the students of the Law
school, especially, the first year men,
have been eagerly searching their mail,
envading the sanctums of professors,
and making frequent calls at the
clerk's office but to no avail.
Grades for the seniors will be sent out
during the latter part of next week.
The other grades did not reach the
postoffice in time to be delivered yes-
terday.

*
*
*
*
*

Sanitary
ing and Pressing
Co.
Phone 2225

.ccessors to F. L. Hall
514 E. WILLIAM ST.
only $1.00 for your double-disc
records and save many quarters.
Idinger's Music Shop. 122 E. Lib-
tf

* * * '* ,* * ** * * *
Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Packard Academy. I

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