100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 18, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
PARTLY CLOUDY AND
MUCH COLDER

L

0*
AWW Aqqr wt t1kan

~E~AtF

UNITED PRES
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 94. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1917. PRICE FIVE CE

FACULTY APPROVES
MILITARY THAINING

Several Department Heads Express
Favorable Sentiment on
New Courses
ARMY OFFICER TO BE SENT
TO UNIVERSITY SHORTLY
Western Colleges Show General lack
of Interest 1i Preparatory
Movements
By L. S. T.
Michigan's faculty is heartily be-
hind every effort the student body can
make to prepare themselves for mill-
tary service. A number of the de-
partment heads have expressed them-
selves during the last few days and
almost without exception they favor
early action of this kind in Michigan.
Professor Reeves of the department
of political science and international
law was emphatic in his opinion that
Michigan should begin constructive
work without delay. "I am strongly
in favor of military drill," said Pro-
fessor Reeves. "I do nt say that it
is the best form of physical exercise,
because I am not familiar with the
science- of physical training.
"That is not the point. This is a
time when we must assume the r'
sponsibilities of citizenship, and I
kno'w of no better way for Michigan
students to do so than by taking an
active interest in the proposed course
in military training."E
Believes Michigan Will Respond.
"Surely the student body here will,r
if the matter is put up to them square-
ly, be as ready to respond as under-t
graduates have already done at Har-t
vard and Princeton and elsewhere."
President H. B. Hutchins .In al. In-
terview stated that the following is
the last communication received by the;
authorities in regard to the detail ofi
an officer by the war department to
take charge of the subject of militarya
instruction in the University:- I
"The department commander di-t
rects me to inform you that the ap-I
plication of the University of Michi-t
gan for government aid, under sectionp
56, act of congress, approved June 3,t
1916, has been received and that ana
officer will be designated to inspect
the University at an early date. 1
(Signed) "Wm. Beyden, t
"Acting Department Adjutant."a
President Hutchins Interested.p
President Hutchins expressed hisn
deep interest in the voluntary military1
organizations among the students, hisa
desire that this voluntary work should
receive the enthusiastic support of the
student body, and the hope that larger
numbers would indicate their interest
by joining the organizations.
It was his opinion that the securing1
oe a detail would be somewhat delayed
on account of present conditions and
that it is our duty to do all that we
can to encourage interest in the work
pending the arrival of the military in-_
structor. -t
There is a general lack of interest
in preparatory movements in nearlyb
all middle-western and western uni-w
versities. Much of this is due to t
geographical remoteness from thath
part of the country which is most
(Continued on Page Six.) G
BIG BRITISH DRIVE U
GAINS ON BAPAUMEA

UNION OPERA TO MAKE
EXTENSIVESPRING TRIP
TOLEDO AND CHICAGO ARE ONLY
ENGAGEMENTS OUTSIDE
OF STATE
Ann Arbor, March 21, 22, 23, and 24.
Detroit, Monday, April 9.
Toledo, Tuesday, April 10.
Grand Rapids, Wednesday, April 11.
Battle Creek, Thursday, April 12.
Chicago, Friday, April 13.
Saginaw, Saturday, April 14.
Final arrangements have been made
for the annual trip of the Michigan
Union opera to be. taken during the
spring vacation, and the schedule in

Where Were You Friday Night?
Our Sarah Nade Went Sybilling
By SARAH NADE.
The rooms were directly across the street from each other. One
was decorated with banners and posters and hazy with the smoke from
"sensible cigarets" (we get nothing for this ad). The other room was
Decorated with the "Weeping Mag 'alene," "Hope" and impossible Max-
field parish pictures; it was filled with a noticeable odor of the perfume
that would have added to the charms of the queen of Sheba (more free
advertising). At any rate, both rooms were decorated and filled. The
occupant of the avowedly unaesthetic room was leaning over a very
untidy desk and dreaming of singing and dancing and pretty girls.
Gloom, blue, thick, and heavy was almost overpowering.
Across the way at 1702 the occupant of the would-be aesthetic room
sat at a desk half hidden by a fancy and unnecessary desk set. The
task of the moment was the removing of men's pictures from several
ornate frames.
The campus clock struck six. As the occupant of the room at 1701
jumped up to attend the demands of a suspiciously healthy appetite,
words something like this were heard: "Ye Gods, she can't care for that
simple matinee idol or that fool Dutchman, wonder, that she is."
At the same time Miss 1702 arose languidly and murmured: "I can-
not forget his smile, the youth in it. He can't care for her; she is too
old. Was Garrick any more wonderful?"
And still we call musical comedies "light."

BY DEFETING NOTRE AME, 46-31UI I

its final form shows six out-of-tow
engagements. This is by far the mos
extensive trip to be taken by any
opera, the production last year visit
ing but three cities, while the long.
est trip ever to be taken by an opera
previous to this year was that of the
year before last when four out-of-
town stops were made
The initial performance to be given
outside of Ann Arbor will be in De-
troit at the Lyceum theater on Mon-
day, April 9. From Detroit the opera
will jump to Toledo, playing at the
Valentine theater on the following
evening. Grand Rapids will be the
next stop, the production being given
at the Powers theater of that city on
Wednesday, April 11.
Battle Creek will be visited next,
where the Post theater will be the
scene of the production on Thursday
evening. On Friday night the opera
will be given at the Auditorium, Chi-
cago's finest theater. This, it is ex-
pected, will be the biggest out-of-
town presentation of the opera, due to
the immensity of this theater as well
as the great number. of Michigan
alumni in Chicago. The final produc-
tion of this year's opera will be in
Saginaw where it will be seen at the
Academy of Music Saturday, April 14.
The cast will hold its next rehearsal
at 4 o'clock tomorrow afternoon at the
Union. The chorus will also meet at
the Union at the same time for sing-
ing, while the dancing rehearsal for
the chorus will be held at 7 o'clock
Monday night at the Union. All mem-
bers of the chorus are expected to be
at both the chorus rehearsals Monday.
Pictures have been taken of the
leading characters in the play and
these will be shown in the program
and in the opera extra which will ap-
pear at a later date. The committee-
men will have their picture taken at
10:30 o'clock this morning at Randall
and Pack's.
GERMANS WHO SANK
SHIP IN U. S. BONDED
Wen Charged with Sinking of Lieb
ensel in Charleston Harbor, Ap-
pear Before Commissioner
Charleston, S. C., Feb. 17.-Captain
Tlattenhoff, master of the German in-
terned freighter Liebensel, and his
eight officers were formally charged
by the government late this afternoon
with voluntarily sinking, or allowing
o sink, the vessel while it lay in the
harbor here, soon after President Wil-
son broke diplomatic relations with
Germany.
The officers were taken before
United States Commissioner Hanger.
A bond of $5,000 each was fixed for
appearance for a hearing before the
commission Monday. All pleaded not
guilty.
The Liebensel went down almost di-
ectly across the channel. When tugs
ushing to -the scene offered assist-
ince, the master, it is charged, re-
fused help.
WOOLOGICAL JOURNAL CLUB
TO HEAR REPORTS TUESDAY
Zoological Journal club will meet
uesday evening, Feb. 20, at 7:30
>'clock in room 231 of the zoological
aboratory for the purpose of hearing
everal reports by members of the
'aculty and students. The program;
will consist of three short reports ona
echnical methods, zoological methods,a
nd zoological apparatus, by Dr. G. R.
a Rue, Miss Crystal Thompson, anda
diss Grace Powers; review of Mor-r
an's "Critique of Evolution," by L.h
i. Ver Nooy, and reports on three

-ecent contributions to genetrics by
)r. A. F. Shull.

SCOTT NLARING SPEAKS
IN ANNARBR FRIDAY
FORMERPENNSYLVANIA PROFES-
SOR COMES UNDER AUSPICES
OF SOCIALIST CLUB
Prof. Scott Nearing of the Univer-
sity of Toledo will speak in Univer-
sity Hall at 8 o'clock Friday, Feb. 23.
The subject of his talk will be, "Work-
ing and Owning for a Living." He
will come to Ann Arbor under the
auspices of the Intercollegiate Social-
ist society.
The dismissal of Professor Nearing
for his radical views in economics
from the Wharton School of Commerce
of the University of Pennsylyania in
June, 1915, attracted nation-wide at-
tention. He had been teaching po-
litical economy for nine years and was
one of the most popular men on the
Pennsylvania faculty.
Professor Nearing is the author of
several books on political economy.
One of his best known is "Income."
Previous to his dismissal from the
University of Pennsylvania he had
been active in child labor reform and
oth-er measures in modern economic
reform. Tickets will be on sale at
Sheehan's.
LEAGUE TO ENFORCE
PEACE BACKS WILSONi

BIG NINE OPENS RELAYS
TO ICHGANTRCK MEN
WOLVERINES TO MEET WESTERN
CONFERENCE TEAMS IN
ILLINOIS GAMES
By Walter Eckersall
(Chicago Tribune.)
Chicago, Feb. 17.-The door was
partly opened today for the University
of Michigan's return to the western
conference at a joint meeting of the
faculty representatives and graduate
ton. ittee at the University club here
today. They decided to allow Michi-
gan's track men and relay teams to
compete in the first annual carnival to
be held at the University of Illinois
at Urbana in March.
As a result of this action, the con-
ference let down the bars and re-
scinded its rule made some years ago,
which prohibited a member of the
conference competing against another
school which had withdrawn from the
organization. Every institution which
is a representative of the "Big Nine"
will be represented at the Urbana.
meet. Michiga will send its best ath-
letes to the games, thereby making
the event a stepping stone for Michi-
gan's ultimate return to the fold of
the conference.
Prof. J. F. A. Pyre of the University
of Wisconsin, secretary of the faculty
committee, made the following state-
ment after the meeting: "Today's
meeting was called because Illinois in-j
vited Michigan to participate in its
relays at Urbana on March 3. Michi-
gan accepted. Under the circum-
stances the invitation will be allowed
to stand."
On being asked whether this would
be a stepping stone for Michigan's re-
turn to the conference, Professor Pyre
said: "I have nothing to say, further
than these few remarks." Nothing
could be gleaned from' any member of
the committee, who came to the con-
ference.. It was, on the whole, a pri-
vate affair and apparently every mem-
ber was bound to secrecy.

DR. AKED SPEAKS
AT 7:30 TONIGHT
"America and the World State" to Be
the Subject of Ad-
dress
"American and the World State" will
be the subject of Dr. Ch'arles E.
Aked's address at 7:30 this evening
at the First Presbyterian church in
the Tappan lecture series.
The subject is one on which Doctor
Aked is eminently fitted to speak, as
his whole career has been such as to
give him an intimate acquaintance
with the status of America's relations
to the rest of the world. Born in Eng-
land, a naturalized citizen of the
United States, he is well informed on
the various characteristics of the two
nations, where in they differ and
wherein they are alike.
In his talk tonight he will lay be-
fore his audience his opinions of what
is to be expected after the war, par-
ticularly with reference to the part the
United States is to play in the recon-
struction to follow.
In addition to this evening's talk,
Doctor Aked will deliver two other ad-
dresses today, one at noon before the
United Bible class, and one at the
young people's evening service at 6:30
o'clock. All three talks will be at the
First Presbyterian church.
SEE ANTI-EXTORTION
LAW AS POSSIBILITY
Results of Federal Commission's Fight
in News Print Paper Case
Promises Big Move
Washington, Feb. 17.-As a direct
rect result of the federal trade com-
mission's successful fight to obtain
reaonable rates and equitable distri-
bution of news print paper, a dramatic
anti-extortion law may be rushed
through congress before March 4.
The law as being promulgated now'
by the commission, will be made ap-
plicable to all necessities of existence.
It will be so drawn as to permit
the trade commission to proceed1
quickly and decisively against any in-
dividual or group of individuals who'
intend to corner any commodity or
commodities for the purpose of boost-
ing prices.
Such a law as planned, wi'J give the
federal trade commission power and
authority to declare a federal receiver-
ship for the purpose of regulating
prices and distribution of any com-
modity.<

FROM FIRST EVENT TAIEN B
VARSITY SHOT PTTER I WOL
VERINES MA N1AI LEAD
CARROLL WINS MILE
IN FEATURE NUMBEI
Kesler in Pole Vault and Beardsle
in Hig H urdles Upset Dope;
lisitors Take Half
Michigan took away a 46-31 con
from Notre Dame in the opening traci
meet of the 1917 season last night.
From the start of the meet whe
Cross hurled his second try with th
shot for a distance of 45 feet 3 inche,
the Wolverines were never headed.
Notre Dame journeyed to Ann Arbo:
minus the loss of Dutch Bergman
sprinter and quarter miler. Bergma
contracted a slight attack of typhob
fever Thursday and left for home the
next day. It is doubtful whether Berg
man will be able to compete in athlet
ics this season.
The feature of an otherwise tam
and sleepy evening for the 1,000 per
sons around the lower extremities o:
the gymnasium was the mile run. Fo
about seven laps Carroll kept Sedg-
wick with him, the captain enjoyin
himself with springing a few of h
collection of new jokes upon his sol
companions.
By this time the weather eyeof
Eddie saw that the duo of Notre
Damers were not far in tie rear. The
crowd began to call for Eddie t
open up. He did so. He caused many
eyes to open wide as well. Before the
end of the ninth lap the captain had
lipped the Catholics. At the finisj
he was nearly 1 1-4 laps ahead of the
first Hoosier. His time of 4:25 3-5 is
exceedingly fast for this time of the
year. Sedgwick, running his first mile
in regular competition, also performed
most creditably, tearing off the ten
laps in approximately 4:35.
Cross Takes Shot Put.
After Cross had tossed the' pill in
excess of 45 feet, Smith proceeded to
surpass the best efforts of Bachman,
the husky South Bender. Pat's best
hurl was 41 feet 9 inches, just one inch
beyond the best work of Bachman
Michigan won both heats in the 50-
yard dash and Obie and Scofield pro
ceeded to beat Mulligan and Captain
Miller to the tape in a pretty final.
Less than a yard soparated the four
:ontenders at the tape.
Notre Dame representatives too
away both first and second in the
half mile. Fox seemed to have an off
day, but Bouma came in third, fin-
ishing in good style. The run was a
good one for the first three laps, with
Meehan slightly in the lead, and none
of the first four men showing signs
of tiring. In the next lap Fox started
to give out, and at the finish was sev-
eral yards in the rear of Bouma, who
was beaten by nearly 20 yards.
Simmons Affords Merriment
Beardsley slightly surprised the
spectators by taking a positiqn be-
tween Kirkland and Starrett, who won
first and third places in the high
hurdles.
The antics of the elongated Sim-
mons afforded much amusement for
the spectators during the high jump.,
During the stages of this event when
the bar was much closer to the ground
than at the finish, Vic's carefree, easy
method of clearing the timber brought
forth many smiles. As the bar stead-
ily progressed upward, the smiles of
the smiles of the crowd changed to
expressions of approval. Vic cleared
the bar at 5 feet 10 1-4 inches, and
after two failures at 6 feet, called it
enough. Haigh gave the coach cause

for joy when he cleared the timber
one inch under the winning height.
Scofield finally won the quarter
mile after chasing around Fontanna
on both turns and running about ten
yards more than would have been nee-
essary if he-had attained-the pole. He
only won after a hot race with both the
Norte Dame leaders and Fontanna.
Less than a yard separated the four
contenders. The officials had to hold a
short debate before awarding the de-
cisions. The time was but 54 seconds.
Hardell, Fontanna, and Scofield have
each done faster than this during the
last two weeks.
(Continued on Page Three)

Declares in Favor of "Vigorous
Adequate Measures to Pro-
tect Citizens"

and

New York, Feb. 17.-The league to
enforce peace locked the dove outside
this afternoon at a session here, passed
a resolution pledging the support of
the league to the government and de-
clined to send delegates to a conven-
tion of peace societies.
The resolution pledging support to
the government declares loyalty "to
President Wilson and the national ad-
ministration in the adoption of vigor-
ous and adequate measures to protect
our citizens and defend their rights
on land and sea, and to provide for the
defense of our country."

NAVAL

RESERVES GAIN NEW
MEN DESPITE PROSPECTS

Princeton Abolishes Two-Sport Rule.
Princeton, N. J., Feb. 17.-Prince-
ton has abolished the two-sport rule
in athletics.

Gen. Haig's Terse Report
Teuton Retreat on
and Half Front

Announces
Mile

London, Feb. 17.-British troops
have made a sensational gain on the
bloody road to Bapaume. Field Mar-
shal Haig reported in terse 'sentences
tonight these facts regarding the vic-
tory: "Very considerable further prog-
ress on both sides of the Ancre. We
occupied German positions opposite
Miramount and Petit Miramount on a
frontage of about a mile and a half.
We penetrated the German lines over
a thousand yards to a point within a
few hundred yards of Petit Miramount,
and carried an important position
north of Baillescourt farm."
The gains were held against all
counter attacks. The new British
positions are a bare six miles from
the strategic point of Bapaume toward
which British attacks have been edg-

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division
CHARLES F. SKED
Speaks 7:30 P. M.
America and the World-State;
After the \War---What?
-
First .Methodist Church °
A. W. STALKER, D. D., Minister
"niL G G
I u~ -
114ill, Eul
i~oe11110:30 "Afraid"
m 7:30 "Losing God"'U
BI ID

i
1
t
I
t
I

Prospects of active service have not
lessened the stream of recruits seek-
ing entrance to the campus divisions
of the naval reserve, the corps now
lacking but 10 men of its full war
strength. Physical examinations are
being held under the direction of J.
R. Poppen, '17M, assistant medical of-
ficer of the battalion, at the Univer-
ity health service every Tuesday even-
ing. Applications for membership are
also received at this time.
Uniforms for the officers have just:
arrived. Those for the enlisted men
have been ordered and are expected
within the next few weeks. The re-
quisition for arms has also been for-
warded to Washington, but the rresen
crisis in the nation's affairs -renders
the time of the guns' arrival prob-
lematical.
The divisions h6ld weekly drills in
the gymnasium- on Wedneday nights
at which time various phases of sea-
manship are taught the men in addi-
tion to the regular work in military
movements and signalling.,

Red Cross Society to Sew Monday
Work of the Ann Arbor chapter of
the American Red Cross society is
progressing rapidly. The supply bu-
reau of the chapter will begin the
work Monday, Feb. 19, at the ladies'
library, 324 East Huron street. The
meeting will begin at 9 o'clock in the
morning and Mrs. I D. Loree will
have charge of the making of the

-'e" sr -

=n'=s:~.nuI;::nll uninniu.' nur mam

dressings.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan