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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 26, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Official newspaper at the University of
Mid gan. Published every, morning except
M 4nday during the university year.

HOMANCE HAMPANT IN
COLLEGE ATMOSPHERE

h-class work is a natural sequence to having our workrooms on.
-emises. With our workrooms all under one roof-all under con-
ted personal supervision, we are able to produce those finished
rpieces of tailors' art, so utterly impossible for the great bulk of
's.
our dress suit for the J-Hop should be ordered of us, thus insur-
u the best materials, workmanship, and a knowledge of thirty
experience in manufacturing evening clothes.

G. H.
ng Merchant Tailors

Wild Company

State Street

111

DON'T THROW AWAY
your Dull Razor Blades
We will sharpen them better than new
H. L. SWITZER CO.
MWARE 301 State St. SPORTING GOODS
Blue Book Day.
All Sizes and Best Quality
BLVE BOOKS
he Slater Book Shop

Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier $2.5o; b mail, $3.00.
Want ad. stations: cuarry's; Students' sup-
Vly Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed S0 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker.........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church-------------News Editor
LeeaE. Joslyn..... .........City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald..... Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson....Telegraph Editor
Verne . Burnett..........Associate Editor
Golda Ginsburg...........Women's Editor
Carleton W. Reade......... Statistical Editor
Marian Wilson ............. Literary FEditor
E. Campbell...Assistant Business Manager
C Philip Emery. .Assistant Business Manager
Albert E. Horne. . Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau....Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter....Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
J. L. Stadeker E. L. Zeigler
C. M. tickling IdI. M. Carey
B. A. "waney L. W. Nieter
L. S. Thompson E. A. Baumgarth
Reporters
W. A. Atlas Allen Shoenfleld
H. C. Garrison C. L. Roeser
C. S. Clark D. S. Rood
R. H. Fricken G. 0. Brophy
B. L Millar F. A. Taber
D. H. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
K. L. Wehineyer ' J. P. Hart
Annetta L. Wood J. C. Martin
T. F. McAllister
Business Staff
Bernard WohI J. E. Robinson
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Earl F. Ganschow
Walter R. Payne Jackson W. Smart
Harold R. Smith Seymour B. Wilson
FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 1917.
Night Editor-H. C. Garrison

TECHNICAL TRAINING NOT ONLY
END OF CURRICULUM, SAYS
DEAN LLOYD
"The University 'atmosphere is
simply vigorous with adventure and
romance," said Professor Alfred H.
Lloyd, dean of the Graduate school,
in an address at the Y. W. C. A. vesper
service yesterday afternoon. "We lose
the best spirit in the life of the Uni-
versity if we see the curriculum
merely as a means of obtaining tech-
nical training. Every subject is a ques-
tion, and the chief function of the Uni-
versity is to help us find more com-
petent ways of putting the old ques-
tions which are never finally answered.
"The life of inquiry is one of ad-
venture," Prof. Lloyd continued. "It
takes a courageous spirit to ask real
questions, for no one knows to what
answer the facts will lead. Life it-
self is out on a great adventure, seek-
ing the answer to three questions
which it puts from age to age, and
from century to century. These are
never finally answered and it is right
that they should not be. They are the
questions as to what the world is,
what we are, and what God is.
"The real things are too big ever
to be finally reduced to a formula,"
the speaker conluded. "Life would lose
its qualities of romance and adventure
if a solution to any of them were ever
reached."
Following the talk, Miss Florence
Paddock, '17, gave a vocal selection.
OPPOSES TEACHER'S ACTION

Handbooks of Practical Information for
22 Books in the Set - 50 cents each
Ask tov see them at
WABK TE
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORES

Take your Amateur Finishing

TO,

._. .. ,

DAINS

-

11 new shoes are stitched with Goodyear Welt machines.
Te use same machines for repair' work. We believe we
ave the most modern equipped shoe repair shop in Ann
rbor. You'll get high class work and courteoustreatment
t this shop and we think you'll find us worthy of patron-
We. Our call and deliver service is at your disposal. Use it.
Famous Shoe Repairing Co.
HONE 807 301 S. State St.

r
t I

That Cough
will cease Its
Nagging Way
when you allow
PINE BALSOM MENTHOL
- and --
EUCALYPTUS
a closer intimacy
QUARRY DRUG CO'S.
Prescription Store
Cor. State & N. University

J-HOP

I

,._.. j

ANNOUNCEMENT

SAM BURCHFIELD

&CO.

Gives you the best Tailoring service
to be obtained anywhere in the coun-
try, coupled with a wonderful line
of Woolens.

:06 E. Huron Street

Opposite Court House

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO.

_j

We Offer You
ECURITY - - SERVICE - - LOCATION
Resources $3,8ooooo
Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
lain Office--
Northwest Corner Main and Huron
ranch Office--
707 North University Ave.
Farmers & Meebanics Bank
Offers the Best in Modern Banking
SECURITY - - - EFFICIENCY
enient and Pleasant quarters. You Will
eased With Our Service. Two offices
105 S. Main St. : 330 S. State St.
PLAI N

P SUEY

- 25c

AFTER 2-30c
om 12-2 Special steaks & chops
Ul kinds American Style
short orders
Will open 11 a. m. to 1 a. m.
iChigan Inn 611 E. Liberty
Telephone 948-R
at a typewriter from
D. D. MORRILL
322 South State Street
will furnish you an instruction
ok free of charge. You will be a
1st before you know it.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Cars run on Eastern time, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:35 a.
m., 8:io a. m. and hourly to 7:10 p. m., 9:10
Kalamazoo Limited Cars--8:45 a. r. and
every two hours to 6:48 p. m.; to Lansing,
8:48 p. mn.
Jackson Express Cars-(Local stops west of
Ann Arbor)- :48 a. m. and every two hours
tee 7:48 p. mn.
Local Cars Eastbpund-5:35 a. m,, 6:40 a
m., 7:05 a. m. and every two hours to 7:05 p.
m., 8:05 p. m., 9:05 p. m., 10:50 p. m. to
Ypsilanti only, 9:2o a. in., 9:so a. in., 2:05 p
in., 6:o5 p. in., 1245 P in., x ao a. ., :2t
a. mn. Tlo Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound-6:5 a.n., 7:5e a.
in., I0:20 p. M.. 12:20 a. n-
t Takes Pictures
Develops Films
ai~makes Prints
and Enlarge-
mets,
713 E. VNIVERSITY
(A~ WILES 'A Alarm Clocks
t 10 F4SEYFIE $1.0 0 Up
Fountain Pens-
Waterman and Conklin
U. of M. Jewelry
Schlanderer & Seyfried
MOENARBER SHOP
BODE 332 State St.
A Particular Place
for Particular People.
FRANK C. BOIICH, Prop,
Extension Lectures
Mr. R. K. Immel of the oratory de-
partment, will give a reading of the
"Servant in the House," tomorrow
night at Fremont, Mich.
Dr. Elsie Seely Pratt will give an
address at Clark's Lake, Mich., tomor-
row night on "Vocational Training
for Girls."
Prof. Robert M. Wenley will speak
on "The Relation of Philosophy to
Life," at Alpena tomorrow night.

A CRISIS IN THE HONOR PLAN
Two-thirds of the Michigan student
body representing the literary, dental,
and architectural colleges, have voted
for an honor system. This was a big
step forward, but it is a long way
from the firm establishment of an hon-
or system in the University. The Stu-
dent council has drawn up a plan
by which the classes may decide in-
dividually' whetter they desire the
honor code. Upon the manner in
which this plan is presented to the
students and the way in which they
consider it depends the success or
failure of the honor system at Mich-'
igan.
In accordance with a. suggestion
from Dean Effinger, many professors
in the Literary college put the pro-
position up to theirclassestyesterday.
while others are planning to take up
the question today.
A senior lit has written to the The
Daily alleging that in one of his class-
es the honor plan was practically
forced upon the students. If this was
true, it is most unfortunate, but we
do not believe the case is typical of
the reception of the honor plan. The
honor plan originated among the stu-
dents, and a majority of them have
registered their sentiment in favor of
it. Possibly a majority of the fac-
ulty are also in favor of the plan, but
to believe that even the most enthus-
iastic sponsors of the system will at-
tempt to force it upon their students
is hardly reasonable.
It is important that the plan be giv-
en careful consideration at this time.
It is also important that it be pre-
sented by the instructors in a tactful,
fair way.

SENIOR LIT OBJECTS TO ALLEGED
FORCING OF HONOR SYSTEM EX-
AMS UPON STUTDlENTS
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
Today I voted against the proposed
honor system because I 1 not con-
sider nmyself "my brother's keeper."
Nineteen in a class of 47 voted "no"
for the same reason. This did not
give the two-thirds majority required
in the plan. Nevertheless, the in-
structor announced that 28 in favor
was "near enough" and that the class
will write under the honor system,
those opposing of course, to have a
separate examination.
The Daily and the letter of instruc-
tions to the faculty explicitly states
that "Those students who oppose the
plan in the balloting are to be given
their examination under the old sys-
tem at the same time that the honor
examination is taking place." The in-
structor in this class went further and
said that "those taking the separate
examination will have their blue
books inspected before being allowed
to write in them." A humorous ref-
erence to a bodily search and investi-
gation of cuffs was made. And then
he, in all seriousness, said, "if any
member of the class taking the separ-
ate examination shall give the slight-

est hint that he might be cheating-an f

Features, Fun,
and Facts, in

Ten Pages

action even though it would take the
broadest stretch of the imigination to
construe it into cheating (I use his
exact words) - that member's paper
shall be confiscated and a grade of E
shall be given him in the course." In
fact, this instructor put the contrast
so strongly that he evidently intended
to force all to take the honor exam-
ination.
Personally, I think he is laboring
under a misunderstanding either of
the honor system or of human nature.
He reasons that all those who oppose
the honor system do so because they
want an opportunity to cheat, and he
plans A4o make it just as disagreeable
for them as is possible.
I, for one, object to having an hon-
'or system forced upon me, and I know
of others who feel the same way.
'17 LIT.

44

What would the Gargoyle be
were not for the co-eds?-and
there is the Inlander.

if it
then

Clothes and Accessories
THE
Varsity 'Togger-y
SHOP
1107 S. University St.
CHOP off a few
minutes and eat some of
GEORGE'S SJEY
WAK ING moLOO
314 S. State St. Phone 1244-M
GLEE CLYB WILL SING FEB. 10
Will Present Trip Concert on Day
Following Hop
On Saturday, Feb. 10, the program
given on the trip, which is slightly dif-
ferent from that presented at the
Christmas concert Dec. 15, will be of-
fered in Hill auditorium as an added
attraction to those attending the J-hop.
The University of Michigan Glee
and Mandolin club sang before a total
of 23,053 people on its trip west this
year, according to figures compiled
by Maurice Nicholls, '17E, manager of
the club. This is the largest number
ever reached by any Michigan musical
club during one trip, and includes
those who heard the concerts given
on the train and in the various cities.
The Michigan Daily for service.

The old wheeze about not cracking
a book all semester is getting worn
with constant use.

W1omen

I

With but 25 taxicabs to serve three
J-hops, it may be necessary to start
the various parties at intervals of half
an hour.r
Freshman coach McGinnis is angry
these days because the Varsity is tak-
ing all the good games away from his
first year team.
The Bethlehem Steel corporation
has cut another melon. We'd be hap-
py with the skin of one seed.
A submarine was referred to both
as a "her" and "it" in a story re-
ceived yesterday. We don't know
whether to refer the problem to the
engineering college or; the rhetoric
department.
Special Sunday evening luncheon,
twenty-five cents. Bloomfield's, N. Un-
iversity. 19-20-26-27
Block M Chocolates in Yellow and
Blue, $1.00 a pound.. Bloomfields, N.
University. 19-20-26-27

Baby Souvenir
J -=Hop Extra
Orders for ten or more Saturday
copies will be delivered FebruaryI
without extra charge Five Ce n

The Women's league party announe-
I for tonight will not be given.
There will be a regular Women's
eague party at 4 o'clock this after-

morning
10, 1917
its each

Girls wishing to arrange for
ile hikes during the last week of
minations, call Harriet Walker,
t450-R,

ten
ex-
'17,

nel Shirts made to order. G. I-.
Company. Leading merchant
. State street. tf

S

r

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