100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 26, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-J wY J.jCL . 1 nAL, r
R AND COLDER
TODAY

I

V

-4mv Ai

4w

UNITED PRES
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

I

I

VOL. XXVIL No. 87.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 1917.

PRICE FIVE C

t

IBSEN'S "PILLARS
of SOCIETY" WINS
MUCH APPLUSE
FIRST WORK OF NORWEGIAN AU-
THOR PRESENTED ON MICHI.
GAN CAMPUS
J. C. CARY, '19, MAKES
EXCELLENT SHOWING
Lena Sackett, '18, Makes Hit With Im-
personation of Small
Boy
"Pillars of Society," Henrik Ibsen's
powerful social drama was last night
presented by the Oratorical association
before an appreciative audience in
University Hall. This was the first
presentation of any of Ibsen's dramas
by Michigan students and represented
the heaviest dramatic production that
the association has yet undertaken.
The play is an indictment of the sup-
erficial morality that Ibsen has seen is
everywhere present. Through it all,
the author has shown that morality
and virtue is often a sham and a
cloak for treachery and baseness.
J. C. Cary, '19, took the leading part,
carrying the role of Karsten Bernick,
the wealthy ship builder of the little
coast town of Norway. This wgs the
first appearance of Cary in campus
dramatics and his presentation of the
"pillar of society" was a most credit-
able one.
E. Louise Robson, grad., took the
part of Mrs. Bernick and her work
was of a quality that spoke for her
appearances in campus productions as
a member of the Comedy club.
Olaf, the incorrigible son of the
Bernick's, played by Lena M. Sackett,
'18, hugely pleased the audience with
her representation of the average boy,
her work being unrestrained and nat-
ural, especially her ecstatic antics
when first viewing the circus.
Mrs. Rummel, Mrs. Holt, and Mrs.
Lynge, the inevitable gossips of the
town were admirably handled by
Pearle E. Smith, '17, Gertrude Ser-
geant, '18, and Helen M. Richey, '17.
George W. Hulbert, '17, as Rorlund.
the schoolmaster who had appointed
himself guardian of the public morals;
Olive Hartsig, '17, as Martha, the sis-
ter of Karsten Bernick, and Eva Shar-
row, '17, as Dina Dorf with, auburn
locks and temperament to match, car-
ried their parts in a manner display-
ing long and careful preparation.
Others who performed creditably in
their roles were R. C. Hunter, '17, as
Johan Tonneson; T. A. Hart, '19, as
Rummel; H. L. Haag, '17, as Hilmar
.Tonneson, and Miriam Toles, '17, as
Lona Hessel. Minor parts were taken
by J. C. Stern, '17, Mark Bailey, grad.,
M. F. Peters, '17, G. D. Wilner, '17, E.
Ray Baxter, '18, W. H. Townsend, '18.
C. C. Bailey, '17, P. E. Brown, '17, J.
Fishbach, Jr., '17, C. R. Layton, 'grad.,
B. F. Magruder, '18, E. H. Nelson, '17,
P. D. Womeldorf, '18, C. E. Bailey, '17,
Edward Buckner, '19, C. C. Gracey, '17,
and Ji. Parzlen, '19.
Th' direction of the play was under
the management of Prof. R. D. T.
Hollister and Mr. Louis Eich, of the
oratory department.
MAKE FIRST INDICTMENTS
IN ELECTION FRAUD PROBE
"Cincinnati, Jan. 25.-Six sealed in-
dictments containing the names of 99

defendants were returned in the vote
fraud probe here today. It was an-
nounced the names of those indicted
would not be made public until after
they had been taken into custody. This
was the government's first definite
blow in its investigation of charges of
election frauds in the niiddle west. It
was believed in political circles sev-
eral prominent men 4nd at least two
city officials were in olved.

Boston Symphony
Concert Tonight
Urge Audience to be Prompt, as Doors
Will be Closed lDuring
Numbers
The Boston Symphony orchestra,
consisting of 100 expert musicians, and
conducted by Doctor Kari Muck, will
present a concert in Hill auditorium
this evening at 8:00 o'clock.
This organization, which was found-
ed in the late 80's, has made wonderful,
progress and now occupies a foremost
place among organizations of its kind
in the world.
The program this evening will con-
sist of Schumann's symphony in E flat
major, known as the "Rhenish Sym-
phony," Brahm's "Academic Festival"
overture, Bizet's suite, "L'Arlesienne,'
and Wagner's popular "Tannhauser"
overture.
All persons are urged to be.in their
places promptly at 8:00 o'clock, as the
orchestral numbers are long and the
doors will be closed throughout each
number.
WOMEN ATTACKED BY
INLANDER ARTICLE
M. F. Dunne, '17L, Writes Arraignment
of Co-Education in the
University
Away back in 1870, the legislature
passed a resolution requesting the reg-
ents of the University to admit to the
institution any person "possessing the
requisite literary and moral qualifica-
tions." This was the dawn of co-edu-
cation at Michigan. Among faculty,
students and townspeople, says a his-
torian, there was a weeping and wail-
ing and gnashing of teeth.
Many charges have been laid at the
door of women, from lowering of schol-
arship to corrupting of campus morals.j
Maurice F. Dunne, '17L, has arraigned
them once again before the bar of;
public justice. His indictment is con-
tained in an article to be found in the;
January ummber of the Inlander whicht
goes on sale at noon today.-
The contents of the magazine show1
three articles dealing with topics both
timely and important, two short stories
cleverly executed, a parable, and at
dialogue excelling in their pointedt
brevity, besides several poems of merit
and numerous editorials which image
student thought and opinion:
ANN ARBOR TO HAVE
$170,000 CHURCHt

'REGULAR STANDNG
ARMY' SAYS WISON,
Makes 14ply to Queries to Delegatio?
of Representatives of National
Security Rody
TAKES ISSUE WITH ATTACK
MADE BY LEAGUE MEMORIAL
President States He Does Not Believe
Compulsory Military Service Will
Solve Defense Problem
Washington, Jan. 25.-President Wil-
son today told a delegation of Balti-
more and Boston representatives of the
National Security league, who called
on him at the White I-louse, that he
does not believe universal compulsory
military service would solve this coun-
try's preparedness program. He took
issue with a memorial in which the
present system of defense was scath-
ingly denounced.
He intimated he believed a regular
standing army may prove to be the
only real solution, since it would be
the only system which would eliminate
withdrawal of men from civil pursuits,
for even brief service. At the same
time he admitted that "physical train-
ing is needed" and declared the exe-
cutive and legislative branches of the
government are giving "serious con-
sideration" to what is "the wise thing
for the defense of the country."
Criticizes Language of Memorial
The president opened his remarks
by saying he would have been more
impressed by' the delegate's conven-
tion if they had expressed themselves
in "more restrained language." "From
some of the unqualified statements in
this paper I must frankly dissent,"
the president said. "Any brief serv-
ice in the army of the United States
withdraws men from civil pursuits just
as much as the recent service on the
borner does. No service excepting a
standing army with professional sol-
diers prevents that occasional and fre-
quent withdrawal of men from civil
pursuits.
Suggestions Will Be Considered.
"Notwithstanding the fact that I
think you have gone too far, I will say
for you that of course this will have
my most serious consideration. I am
sure that speaking, if I may speak,
for the members of the house of rep-
resentatives and the senate, we are all
desirous of doing the wise thing for
the defense of the country and it must
and will be done, but we must not
cause debate by having too dogmatic
an opinion as to a method. Unques-
tionably physical .training is needed
and will accomplish a great deal, but
it can be had withouf compulsory mili-
tary service, and compulsory service
does not meet the difficulty which you
have alluded to."
Attacks "Impotence'" of Old Policy.
"The 'utter impotence' of the United
States to defend itself against the
world powers is apparent to all think-
ing men since the outbreak of the Eu-
ropean war," Judge Alton B. Parker,
former Democratic presidential candi-
date and chairman of the league con-
vention, declared. "Immediate pre-
paredness," he said, "is the first step
in the task of insuring ourselves
against war, just as we insure our
dwellings against fire.''
The paragraph to which the presi-
dent took most vigorous exception in
the Maryland league memorial was the
following: "The injustice of our pres-
ent system is receiving a striking il-

lustration from the spectacle now pre-
sented on our Mexican border. There
we have seen men doing police duty
in time of peace who ought never to
be called upon for military service
away from their homes except as ar
last resort. It is a scandalous waste
of public money to have this police

FLAMES DESTROY
EREMITES HOSE
FireBreaks Out in South State Street
Club Early Thursday
Morning
PROPERTY, VALUED AT $17,000,
CARRIED $10,000 INSURANCE
Members housed by Friends-Will
Move to Temporary Quarters
in a Few Days
Thirty Eremites were homeless for
a short time yesterday morning as a
result of a fire which destroyed their
house at 1365 South State street.
Two members of the club discovered
the fire at 8:40 o'clock as they were
leaving for their 9 o'clock classes. By
the time the fire department arrived
the third floor was a mass of flames.
With the aid of a number of bystand-
ers the students succeeded in removing
practically all of the furnishings from
the first and second floors. Every-
thing on the third floor, however, was
a complete loss. Included in the miss-
ing articles are a number of notebooks
of various members, containing the
work of the whole semester.
The property, which isaowned by F.
E. Ward, was valued at about $17,000,
and was covered by $10,000 insurance.
The cause of the fire is thought to
have been a defectiveflue.
The members went to the homes of
friends for the time being, but they
will move within the next few days
to temporary quarters at 916 Monroe
street.
Senator Offers
New. Resolution
Borah Warns U. S. Against Danger of
Entangling Alliances; Urges Also
Support of Monroe Doctrine
Washington, Jan. 25.-Senator Borah
today offered a resolution in which he
warned the United States against
"danger of becoming involved in any
entangling alliances with European na-
tions," and asked the senate to re-
affirm the principles of the Monroe
Doctrine. While Borah did not at first
admit it, he did not, however, deny
his resolution was aimed directly
against the address of President Wil-
son to the senate last Monday.
The resolution at Borah's request
was laid on the table and as he in-
dicated will be called up for discus-
si(n, probably tomorrow. In the pre-
amble Borah quotes George Washing-
ton's warning against entangling al-~
liances. The resolution follows: "Be
it resolved, that the United States re-
a firms its faith and confidence in the
permanent worth and wisdom of these
policies (the Monroe Doctrine), and
shall seek in all matters coming before
it, touching those interests or affairs
of foreign countries, to confine its acts
to these time honored principles so
long and so happily a part of our own
policies."
("tt Rate Hangman Applies for Job,
Springfield, Ill., Jan. 25.-Attorney
General Edward Brundage has re-
cdived a letter from I. M. Holmes, pub-
lic executioner of Montreal, offering to
perform the public hangings of the
state for $75 each. He also asks for

is expenses from Toronto.
"I am afraid he is trying to cut the
union rates for hanging," the attorney
general said. "They pay $100 per hang-
ing in Cook county."
N egro Presidential Candidate Dies

Believes Codes Are
Knolvn Abroad

State Department Admits Its Belief in
Statement of High Official
in Leak Probe
Washington, Jan. 25.-Confidential
messages of the state department have
leaked out because the state depart-
ment codes are known abroad, a high
official stated today. Because of this
the codeshave been altered from time
to time and it is hinted that they have
been changed only recently. Charges
that the codes are known abroad have
been made frequently. Until today,
however, the department has never ad-
mitted its belief that the code is in
foreign hands.
New phases of the house leak com-
mittee query as to whether New York
brokers had information from abroad
on the president's recent note, the ad-
mission from the state department to-
day appeared significant. It may mean
that this government hopes to trace
the leak abroad rather than to Wash-
ington.
About nine months ago the, United
Press carried a dispatch from Berlin
to the effect that a section of the
United States code had been known
in many European capitals and that
knowledge of this had caused a sud-
den altering of the codes used by this
government.
INDEPENDENTS MEET AT UNION
'O SECURE BOOTHS FOR J-HOP
All independents who desire to se-
cure booths at the J-hop this year
should meet at the Union at 9:30
o'clock Sunday morning, in order to
arrange for the location.
Announcement was made yesterday
by V. H. Simmons, '18, chairman of the
publicity committee, that the contract
for the coffee and punch has been
awarded to the Renellen Hospice.
Harry Nicholls was given the wafer
contract, while the programs are to be
furnished by Wright and company of
Philadelphia.
SLEEPER OPPOSES
STATE RAILROAD
Governor Believes "Complete Super-
vision" Better Plan Than
Ownership of Lines
Lansing, Jan. 25.-Governor Albert
E. Sleeper today declared definitely
against Attorney-General Grosbeck's
proposal for state ownership of rail-
roads. "Supervision by the state, con-
trol over rates and adequate direction
by state authorities with full super-
visory powers is what the state needs
in railroad matters," the governor de-
clared. "Given complete supervision,"
he said, "the investment of millions
of state funds would be uni'cessary."
The governor outlined his attitude
after studying the communication from
Attorney-General Grosbeck, suggesting
that the governor place before the leg-
islature for submission a constitutional
amendment to permit state ownership
of railroads as a preliminary step to-
ward possible purchase of the Michi-
gan property of the Grand Trunk. Gov-
ernor Sleeper will transmit the com-
munication to the legislature tomor-
row without comment.
Nurses' Training School Gives Dance
The members of the University
training school for nurses will give a
dancing party Friday evening at the
Union. The patrons and patronesses
will be: Dr. and Mrs. Reuben Peter-
son, Dr. and Mrs. Charles Washburn.
Dr. and Mrs. Carl H. Laws.
Dr. and Mrs. L. 'H. Newburgh, Dr

and Mrs. Rudolph A. Bartholomew,
Dr. and Mrs. Arnold L. Faroby, Dr.
and Mrs. L. L. Bottsford, Dr. and Mrs.
De Bois Barss, Dr. and Mrs. Grady E.
Clay, Dr. and Mrs. A. D. Prangen,
and Dr. and Mrs. Harold Henderson.

LTERARY CLLEGE
CLASSES BALLOT
ON HONOR EXAW~
INSTRUCTORS ACT UPON THE SUG
GESTION OF DEAN EF-
FINGER
APPARENT MAJORITY
IN FAVOR OF SYSTEA

No Definite Returns, Due
of Many Sections
Vote

to I
to

Acting upon the suggestion of Dean
John R. Efilger, a large number of
faculty men in the literary college sub-
mitted the proposed honor system to
their students in yesterday's classes.
This step was taken following the pro
posal of the plan by the Student coun-
cil after the vote of the students last
week favoring the system.
It is not possible as yet to say with
any definiteness what proportion of
the courses in the college have approv-
ed the plan. Lack of time prevented
its discussion in several courses and
a number of three-hour courses will
not have an opportunity to consider it
until today. It was the impression of
many that a majority of the classes
in which the instructors decided to
offer the system to their students have
voted favorably.
In several departments a consider-
able part of the hour was given over
to an open discussion of the matter
before a vote was taken. In some of
the smaller classes the proposal was
rejected by the students because the
instructors already have been making
use of an informal honor system and
the adoption of a new method was not
deemed necessary.
In other small classes the vote had
the opposite result although the
method which will be followed Will not
be essentially different from that
which the instructors in charge have
been using in the past.
It will be possible to determine
more accurately what percentage of
the classes have voted to accept the
plan afteT the reports of today's dis-
cussions are received.
As far as could be learned last night,
no action was taken in the Colleges of
Architecture and Dentistry on the
honor system.
EARTHQUAKE KILLS
50 AND INJURES 300
Volcano of Cumong Angong, on Island
of Bali, Destroys Thousands
of Dwellings
Amsterdam, Jan. 25.-Fifty persons
were killed and 300 injured by a seri-
ous earthquake which shook the is-
land of Bali, a Dutch possession in the
Malay archipelago. Dispatches here
today telling -of the earthquake de-
clared thousands of houses, factories
and temples were destroyed.
The volcano of Cumong Angng,
about 10,500 feet in height, Is located
on the island of Bali. The island is
75 mile's long and 40 miles wide.
SIGHT "NEW SUBMARINE";
THINK DEUTSCHLAND NEAR
Newport, R. I., Jan. 25.-A "new sub-
marine" was seen off here today by
several persons. Soon after being
sighted the submarine disappeared in
the haze and no sign of it has been
seen since. The coast guard at Nar-
raganset pier reported this afternoon
that a submarine had passed the pier
bound westward, but that its nation-
ality could not be determined. It was
thought it may have been the Deutsch-
land enroute -to New London, though
United States submarines frequently
operate in these waters.

Erect

Congregationalists Decide to
New Building on Present
Site

A Congregational church valued at
$170,000 will be erected on the site of
the present building, South State and
William street.
This' decision was announced at the
annual meeting of the congregation
held last night, at which Prof. E. C.
Goddard, chairman of the building
committee, lectured for an hour dem-
onstr.ting the inadequacy of the pres-
ent church, which seats 850.
Over $30,000 has already been sub-
scribed for the new building by the
congregation. Another $30,000 will 'e
raised from Ann Arbor, while the re-
mainder is to come froi within the
state, with some aid from the Congre-
gational church building society.
Chemical Engineering Bulletin Out
The new bulletin of the chemical en-
gineering department is just off the
press and over 1,500 copies will be
mailed to heads of chemistry depart-
ments in other schools, alumni of the
department, and also to the high
schools of the state.
The pamphlet contains a complete
description of the five fellowships
which are offered by the department
as well as information on the work
and new courses in chemistry.

Sprinfifield,
Scott, aged 67

Ill., Jan. 25.-W. F.
years, negro, who ran

work done by citizen soldiers. Great for the presidency of the United States
numbers of these men -have gone to on the Liberty party's ticket in 1896,
(Continued on Page Six) died here yesterday.

I

Hill
Auditorium
4P.M.
February 10

Your J-Hop girl expects to attend the
GLEE E M AN OLIN CONCERT
Saturday afternoon after the Hop

Tickets on sale
at WAHR'S and
the BUSY BEE

U

FIFTY CENTS

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan