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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 25, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

in high-class work is a natural sequence to having our workrooms on
the premises. With our workrooms all under one roof-all under con-
centrated personal supervision, we are able to produce those finished
masterpieces of tailors' art, so utterly impossible for the great bulk of
clothes.
Your dress suit for the J-Hop should be ordered of us, thus insur-
ing you the best materials, workmanship, and a' knowledge of thirty
years' experience in manufacturing evening clothes.

G. H.
Leading 1ierchant Tailors

Wild Company

State Street

All Sizes and Best Qxsallity
BLUE BOOKS
The Slater Book Shop

STOP AT
TUTTL E'S
338 S. STATE
for sodas and lunches
GEORGE BISCHiOFF
F L TO RIST
hoice Cut Flowers and Plants
0 Chapin St. Ann Arbor, Mich.
PHONE 809 M

Rowe City Laundry
406 Detroit St
Cash cards save you money
PHONE 457-M
FIRST NATL BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Capital $xoo,ooo Surplus and Profit $65,ooo
DIRECTORS -
Wirt Cornwell Waldo M. Abbott
Geo. W. Patterson Harry M. Hawley
S. W. Clarkson Harrison Soule
Fred Schmid D. B. Sutton
E. D. Kinnie

We Carry a Large Assortment of Candies

We can Satisfy Your Taste
A TRIAL WILL CONVINCE YOU

The Fountain of Youth
State Street Cor. Liberty

..

m

We Offer You
SECURITY - - SERVICE - - LOCATION

Resources $3,800,ooo

Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Main Office--
Northwest Corner Main and Huron
B ranch Office.--
707rNorth University Ave.
The Farmers &Mc ics Bank
Offers the Best in Modern Banking
SECURITY - - - EFFICIENCY
Convenient and Pleasant Quarters. You Will
Be Pleased With Our Service. Two Offices
101-105 S. Main St. : 330 S. State St.
THESUGAR BOWL
109 S. Main St.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Cars run on Eastern time, one hour faster
dean local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:35 a'
r., 8:io a. m. and hourly to :xo p. m., g:to
I 1}. M.
Kalatnazop Limited Cas-8 :4 a. in and
every two hours to 6:48 p. i.; to Lansing,
8:48 P. im.
Jackson Express Cars.-(Local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:48 a. m. and every two hours
tee 7":48 p. mn.
Local Cars Eastbound-s :35 a. m., 6:40 a
M., 7:05 a. m. and every two hours to 7:05 p.
in., 8:5 p. my., 9:05 p. n., 10:50 p. m. to
"?psiianti only, 9:20 a. mn., 9:50 a. in., 2:o5 p
ai., 6:o5 p. in., 11:45 p. in, i :to a. mn., z1:2C
a. m. To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound-6:05 a. m., 7:5o a.
tn., I0:20 P. M.. 12:20 a. m.
U Takes Pictures
makes Prints
g evelops Fls
and Enlarge-
. meats.
713 1. VNIVJERS1TY
LAW STUDENTS MUST HAND IN
ELECTION CARDS BY FEB. 3
Blue Books for Exams Should Be
Turned In by End of
This Week
All law students must hand in their
election cards for next semester to the
clerk's office before Saturday noon,
Feb. 3. The election cards, together
with instructions for taking examina-
tions, a pamphlet on "The Lessons of
Plattsburg," and the semester report
cards will be given out to each stu-
dent when he hands the clerk his blue
books for the coming examinations.
These blue books, one for each exam-
ination, must be in before the end of
this week.
Changes in elections may be made
until the end of the first week of the
second semester. The report cards for
this semester should be filled out, and
left together with a self addressed
stamped envelope, in the clerk's office.
These will be sent out as soon as the
grades are determined, which will
probably be about the second week of
the second semester.1
RABBI WOLSEY TO GIVE THREE
LECTURES IN SUMMER SCHOOL,

Official newspaper at the University of
Mie:,.ggan. Published every morning except
M nday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier $2.50; by mail, $3.00.
Want ad. stations: Quarry's; Students' Sup-
R Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
ones: Business,96; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker..........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church..............New. Editor
Lee E. Joslyn .................. City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald.........Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor
Verne E. Burnett...........Associate E'dito
Golda Ginsburg............Women's Editor
Carleton W. Reade......... Statistical Editor
Marian Wilson............. Literary Editor
j. E. Campbell...Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip Eery..Assistant Business Manager
Albert E. Hone. .Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau. .. Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter.. .Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
J. L. tadeker E. L. Zeigler
C. M. Jickling H. M. Carey
B. A. Swaney L. W. Nieter
L. S. Thompson E. A. Baumgarth
Reporters
W. A. Atlas Allen Shonfield
H. C. Garrison C. L. Roeser
C. S. Clark D. S. Rood
R. H. Fricken G. O. Broph
B. I. Millar F. A. Taber
1. H. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
K. L. Wehmeyer J. P. Hart
Annetta L. Wood J. C. Martin
T. F. McAllister
Business Staff
Bernard 'Woh J. E. Robinson
Paul E. Cholette Iarry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Earl F. Ganshow
Walter R. Payne Jackson W. Smart
Harold R. Smith Seymour B. Wilson
THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 1917.
Night Editor-D. S. Rood
SIT NEXT TO A STRANGER
It is the usual thing for the student
entering the classroom for the first
time in the new semester, to choose
his seat next to friend, a fraternity
brother, or near to one whom he feels
to be in his own social or intellectual
class. It follows that this choice is
not always a wise one. Seated next
to an intimate friend, the student re-
laxes through the medium of their
common notions, and secure in the
proximity of the neighbor, he starts
the usual gossip regarding the other
students enrolled, the instructor, and
sometimes even the subject itself. It
is needless to say that all of this gos-
sip is not conducive to the betterment
of either. The fellow seated up in
front, next to a total stranger, with his
quiet smile and his shabby clothes,
and with his faculties ready to get
what the instructor has to tell him,
offers no inducement for a closer ac-
quaintance. Yet who knows that his
capacities for a close friendship of
the right kind are not there?
The classroom offers the greatest
of opportunities for making friends
and intimates. In the cosmopolitan
atmosphere, in the democratic gather-
ing, are to be found all of the neces-
sary material for intimacy and congen-
iality, and these qualities are not con-
fined alone to the favored few. Con-
fining friendship to one's own social
plane, if we grant any such discrim-
ination at all, is narrowing and is also
in opposition to the primary objects
of a liberal education.
THE ARTS LOST AT COLLEGE
One day the boss called the young
graduate to his office.

"Ignorance in handling men is your
main trouble."
"I thought I couldn't spend too
much time with my books," said the
student.
"You can't so long as you also mix
with all sorts of people."
Another young graduate soon began
to draw pay envelopes from the com-
pany. He quickly saw that his college
preparation was not helping him as
expected.
"I thought college was a place to
meet men," he told the boss.
"It is. But what the company wants
is the young man who is a good fellow,
and one who knows his profession."
Both young men had to start over
somewhere else. Neither one would
have needed to have done so if he
had been sufficiently warned before-
hand.
The Huron is safe - for drinking
purposes.
FOUND-Late yesterday afternoon,
one sidewalk cleaned off.

It will take more than twilight re-
citals to relieve the strains of a num--
ber of students next week. Of course
those lucky history students who are
going to have pink tea served in exams
are not in this class.
LAN DEFENDSSTTEEN
C. S. COHN, '19L, CLAIMS THAT IN-
TEG~RITY OF LAW SCHOOL WAS
NOT ATTACKED
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
Were it not for a total miscompre-
hension of the aim and purpose of my
attack upon the vote upon the honor
system in the Law school in a recent
issue of The Daily, I should not be
answering the communication by Mr.
Rogoski, published in Tuesday's paper.
The integrity of the school as a
whole was not attacked in my article,
but the truthfulness of the vote as an
expression of that school was at-
tacked. There certainly is a big differ-
ence between these two matters. A few
who misuse a voting privilege may
make a vote untruthful as far as con-
cerns an expression of a school, but
the whole school cannot be called dis-
honest on that basis.
Also, there was no partiality shown
toward any side of the question in my
article. It was said in reply that if
there were repetitions in the voting,
it was reasonable to expect that they
were on one side as well as the other.
Surely the writer agrees with that, but
sloes that make the vote a truthful one
as an expression of the school or de-
partment? I should say not! A man
is entitled to one vote, and if more be
taken, the result will be inaccurate
and not a true vote.
The writer has no inclination to go
into the merits of the honor system,
nor did he in his previous article. The
present result, secured through stuf-

.

was fined and imprisoned
ing America's neutrality,
out the difference between
try and Belgium.

for break-
has found
this coun-

PHONE 294

213 E.I

"Y"BOOK

Exchange will be
open from February
first to the fifteenth
Final detailed announce-
ment -will appear in this
space next Saturday.

LANDERS
OR
FLOWERS

Member of Florists' Telegraph
Delivery Service
Flowers by Wire to Ail the World.

Liberty St.

ILittle I.C.S. GiantsI
Handbooks of Practical Information for
- -
Se1a tfi ,M r -
22 Books in the Set --50 cents each
Ask to see them at
I--
VNIVER.SIT"Y B3OORSTORECS
IIl i 1i 11i 1 Nl ttltl t1133l 31111113113llli li1 li ilililli llliilillllillllllli l ltli :
f A PERFECT gentleman ain't pro-
duced by a night's study over
0an etiquette book. Same way with 13
a perfeCt tobacco. f
VELVETsaged in the
wood two years before
it becoe the smooth-
est S Iki g tobacco.
-Am-

fing the ballot, is not an accurate re- pus as a truthful expression of opin-
port of opinion, and if the opinion of ion, then the present writer hopes that
the school was worth taking at all, it such "amusement" shall be of very

SPECIAL SUNDAES
LIGHT LUNCHES
Our candies are made in
our own sanitary shop.

seems that it should be truthful.
The writer's article to this effect was
characterized as "amusing" by the
writer of Tuesday's communication. If
it is "amusing" to have the result of
fraudulant voting stand before the cam-

short duration.
CHARLES S. COHN, '19L.
Buy a Real Shirt--A Manhattan-at
ale Prices.. Reule-Conlin-Fiegel Co.
200-202 Main St.

Get a typewriter from
o. D. MORRILL
322 South State Street
He will furnish you an instruction
book free of charge. You will be a
typist before you know it.
Women
There will be a regular Women's
league party at 4 o'clock Friday after-
noon. e
Dean Alfred H. Lloyd of the Gradu-
ate school will speak on "The True
Spirit of Inquiry" at Newberry ves-
pers at 5 o'clock this afternoon.
The posture examinations will not
interfere with the regular classes in
dancing, swimming, and playground,
which will meet as usual this week.
Miss Florence Paddock, '17, will fur-
nish the special music at the Y. W. C.
A. vesper service this afternoon.
Extension Lectures
Prof. T. E. Rankin spoke last night
at Albion, Mich., on "Five Points of
Americanism."
"How to Judge a Picture" was the
subject of a lecture given by Prof. H.
R. Cross last night at Sturgis, Mich.
Prof. E. R. Turner will speak to-
night in Flint on "Historical England."
Flannel Shirts made to order. G. H:1
Wild Company. Leading merchant
tailors. State street. . tf
The Michigan Daily for service.

i

t
r

Orders now
Accepted

Limited Edition

4rMtkIt~gan 4:attij

Baby Souvenir

Arrangements have been made for
three lectures to be given in the 1917
summer school on "Present Day Jew-
ish Problems," by Rabbi Lewis Wolsey
of Cleveland, O. A similar series has
been given in the past two summer
sessions, Dr. A. Simon of Washington,
D. C., lecturing on the "History of Jew-
ish Education," three years ago, and
Rabbi D. Lefkowitz giving a series
of lectures on "History of Jewish Lit-
erature" last summer.
Senior Engineer Photos Due Feb. 1
All senior engineers must have their
Michiganensian pictures in by Feb. 1.
UnlesK the pictures are taken at
Rentschler's or Randall and Pack's
studios they will not appear in the
class picture which is to be placed in
the Engineering building.
Our alarm. clocks are good clocks.
Chapman, Jeweler, 113 South Main
St. tues-eod

J

- Hop

Extra

We haven't read Maurie Dunne's
article on co-education, but we wonder
how he found out so much about it.
An M sweater wouldn't go badly
these days-but still nobody seems to
care about wearing them.
Franz Bopp, German diplomat, who

11

This edition will not
be delivered to the
regular Daily subscribers

Saturday Morning
February 10, 1917
Five Cents each

t=:

r

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