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January 25, 1917 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-25

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IER AM) Z1ODEIATE
WEST WIXJS

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UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

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VOL. XXVIL No. 86.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 1917,

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RICE FIVE CENTS

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GOVERNORS KEEP
HANDS OFF.WILSON
EFFORT FOR PEACE
BUT SEVEN OUT OF TWENTY
WILLING TO COMMENT
ON MESSAGE
SLEEPER AFRAID OF
HARMFUL ALLIANCE

Brumbaugh Thinks All Should Stand
by Government; Phillips Says
Plan Impossible
New York, Jan. 24\ - Governors
throughout the country are keeping
"hands off" in so far as the president's
peace 'efforts are concerned, or have
apparently reached no conclusion as to
the proposition of this government en-
tering a league to enforce peace. Of
20 from whom statements were sought
today only, seven would comment in
any way. Their statements follow:
Governor Albert E. Sleeper, Michi-
gan-"If the earnest of Qrts of Presi-
dent Wilson can help to restore peace
in a warring world God speed him in
his endeavor, but it seems to me that
entangling European alliances would
mean danger for this nation."
Governor James E. Ferguson, Texas
-"I do not think this government
should enter into any league to en-
force peace. It would be a great mis-
take. We have kept out of the war so
far and we should keep out of any-
thing that might force war upon us.
I am unalterably opposed to the idea
of joining in a peace movement such
as the president proposes."
Would Stand by Government.
-overnor Brumbaugh, Pennsylvania
"There should be no difference of
opinion on international problems. We
should all stand by the government."
Governor E. L. Phillips, Wisconsin-
"For the purpose of renewing the dis-
cussion of peace terms in Europe and
again opening the door for negotia-
tions between belligerent nations
President Wilson's address is both
timely and well worded. As a plan for
the future his suggestions are impos-
sible. As long as men are selfish,
governments will be selfish also, and
so long as selfishness influences the
course of nations, war will be un-
avoidable, particularly upon the Eu-
ropean continent. Our own country
will do better to avoid any responsi-
bility for European entanglements. We
can be arbitrators and make our in-
fluence felt without entering into a
compact with the countries of Europe
' to crush any nation that may wish to
engage in war with any other."
James M. Cox, Ohio-"President Wil-.
son's message marks a distinct epoch
in civilization. It is far seeing and
statesman-like and in conflict with
Washington's idea of entangling alli-
ances for the reason that conditions
are changed."
Kansas Governor Endorses Message.
Governor Capper, Kansas-"I en-
dorse the president's effort for world
peace. If his unheralded speech to
the senate created a powerful impres-
sion upon that body of statesmen the
impression it will make upon the
world will be more powerful. The ad-
dress of the president would not
amount to much if all that could be
said of it is that it speaks for the
United States. What must impress the
rulers of the world in this speech is
that in it is world democracy and in
the United States alone this finds a
spokesman. English and French, Rus-
sian and German hearts will respond
to the democratic note sounded from
the beginning to the end of, this sen-
sational address in the senate cham-
ber. He is speaking for the demo-
crats of the world. The world's de-
mocracy will respond."

MAY Discuss ISON'S
MESSAGE ANY MOMENT
FAILURE TO ACT ON CUMMINS'
RESOLUTION MAY CAUSE
EXTRA SESSION
By ROBERT J. BENDER
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, Jan. 24.-Failing to act
on Senator Cummins' resolution pro-
viding a day at least for general de-
bate on President Wilson's address to
the senate Monday, the senate this aft-
ernoon left the way open for general
discussion of the president's speech at
any time.
While effectually preventing for to-
day passage of the Cummins resolu-
tion, senate Democrats failed to elim-
inate the danger of prolonged discus-
sion on the president's idA. After two
hours of wrangling and debate, the
Cummins resolution . automatically
went to the calendar, whence it can
be called up any time on Cummins'
motion. Action on the resolution can-
not be taken without a vote, but the
senator's mere motion to have it called
up can precipitate debate.
Makes Extra Session Probable.
Following the senate's failure to act
on the motion, Cummins declared he
will take advantage of his privilege at
every chance afforded. The senate
faces the probability of an extra ses-
sion if Cummins carries out his threat.
"It matters not-whether the president
is right or wrong," Cummins said. "In,
either case his pronouncement is the
most important ever made by an exe-
cutive of the United States. The whole}
country so looks upon it and foreign
nations so regard it."
Cummins expressed "appreciation of
the pressure" being brought to bear
upon members of the house and sen-
ate to close up business. He said
avoidance of an extra session was not
answer, however, in favor of putting
off discussion of the president's pro-
posal. He declared the question at
non-partisan one.
COMMISSION WIRES<
APPEAL FOR HELP
Michigan Mtate Railway Body Asks
Federal Aid to Relieve Coal I
Shortaget
Lansing, Jan. 24.--To prevent "great
financial loss and personal suffering"
in Michigan, the state railway com-
mission today sent a telegraphic ap-
peal to the interstate commerce com-
mission for immediate action to re-
lieve the coal shortage in this state.
The telegram follows:
"Recognizing our lack of power to
command interstate carriers, we ap-
peal to your honorable body to takeI
such action as will promptly relieve
the coal situation in this state, due to
embargoes in effect at Toledo and east.-
Business, schools, and homes are in<
great need of fuel and unless condi-
tions can be improved great financialI
loss and personal suffering will en-
sue. If abuse of reconsig iing priv-
ileges is a contributing cause it shouldt
be restricted."
Germans Shoot 784 Aeroplanes Down
Berlin, Jan. 24.-German flyers and
air craft batteries shot down 784 hos-
tile machines during 1916, the officialz
press estimated today, while the Ger-
man forces lost only 221. On the westl
front the British and French lost 739t
aeroplanes and the Germans 181.

STAE

MISS DOROTHY LEONARD
GRAND RAPIDS IS LUCKY
LADY

OF

ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION
PRESENT IBSEN'S "PILLARS
OF SOCIETY"

TO

IS

INDICTMENT OF
SOCIAL MORALITY

J. C. Vary, '19, and Louise Robson,
Grad., to Take Leading
Roles
Henrik Ibsen's "Pillars of Society,"
the only dramatic production to be
given on the campus this semester,
will be presented by the Oratorical as-
sociation at 8 o'clock tonight in Uni-
versity hall.
The drama is a powerful indictment
of social and surface morality, and
coming from the pen of the distingu-
ished Norwegian author, its dramatic
and literary worth are guaranteed.
The play is one of the author's early
ones, and lacks the remorselessness
and utter absence of sympathy that
have characterized the majority of his
later productions. Ironical, caustic in
its condemnation of the superficial
moral worth that the play attacks, it
gives a new light to the structure of
society. «
The plot of the play centers around
a wealthy ship builder, Karsten Bern-
ick by name, and the scene is cast in
one of the small coast towns of Nor-
way.
J. C. Cary, '19, carries the leading
role of Mr. Bernick, while E. Louise
Robson, grad., is cast as Mrs. Bernick.
For the first time in play produc-
tion in the University, the persons
appearing will be given University
credit for the work. Michigan has
taken the precedence in the matter of
awarding credit for dramatic activities
and already many other universities
are adopting the plan as the only one
which will result both in a better pro-
duction and a greater interest being
taken in campus dramatics.
All seats have been reserved at
prices of 25, 35 and 50 cents, and
tickets are now on sale at Wahr's
book store.
JANUARY INLANDER
APPEARS TOMORROW
Literary Magazine Contains Article by
M. C. Weir of Rhetoric
Department
Much interest has been manifested
in the January number of the In-
lander, which will appear tomorrow,
due to features promised by a num-
ber of flaring placards in State street
shop windows.
Two members of the faculty have
lent their aid toward making the pres-
ent number one of literary merit. Two
exquisite rondels by Mr. M. C. Weir of
the rhetoric department will delight
lovers of verse in its purest form,
while the other contribution, a light
dialogue-essay contains a wealth of
wit and wisdom under the title of "If."
This will appear in the magazine
anonomously.
Thirty-two pages comprise the num-
her, and members of the staff are said
to be confident of its appeal to the
campus at large.

Miss Dorothy Leonard of Grand Rap-
ids and a member of the freshman
class of Vassar college, is to be the
partner of Waldo M. McKee, '18E, gen-
eral chairman of the J-hop commit-
tee, in leading the grand march on
the night of the big formal party. Miss
Leonard and Mr. McKee have been
friends ever since childhood, having
attended grammar and high school to-
gether. She will come on to Ann Ar-
bor from Poughkeepsie, N. Y., where
the college is situated.
At the meeting last night at the
Union, the hop committee received a
communication from the Yellow Bon-
net Taxi company stating that they
would furnish 25 machines on the
evening of the hop at a price of only
$1.50 per couple. This rate is 50
cents lower than the rate made by the
Ann Arbor Taxi company, who has
absolutely refused to reduce their
price of $2.00 one cent.
In case there is any man, who for
any reason cannot use his J-hop tick-
et, he may transfer it to a junior or
senior in the University by coming to
the Union at any time between the
hours of 2 and 5 o'clock tomorrow.
All independents who wish to se-
cure booths for the party will meet at
the Union at 9:30 o'clock next Sun-
day morning, when arrangements will
be made by the committee in charge.
The committee wishes to state again
that all booths must furnish their own
punch bowls and also devices for heat-
ing the coffee, although the other re-
freshments will be arranged for by
the former body.
WILL NOT ENDORSE
WILSON'S PROPOSAL
Senate Commerce Committee Votes
Down President's Plan to Pre-
vent Strikes
Washington, Jan. 24.-ie senate in-
terstate commerce committee today by
a vote of ten to five refused to endorse
President Wilson's proposals for the
prevention of strikes or lockouts on
railroads pending arbitration of dis-,
putes. Three Democratic committee-I

VASSAR STUDENT WILL
LEAD MARCH WITH MKEE

UNCLE SAM MAY BUILD
$1,~00000 PAPER PLANT
Washington, Jan. 24. - "Hit
where it hurts most, in the pocket-
book." So thinks Uncle Sam, as
he probably will build himself a
$1,000,000 paper manufacturing
plant. Despite the fact that speci-
fications call for less paper than
last year, the paper the govern-
ment must buy will cost $1,000,-
000 more than that asked for a
year ago.
PROF, YERKES TALKS
ON fVOCAiTIOALTESTS
"CHILDREN OF SUBNORMAL INTEL-
LIGENCE NOT INCORRIGIBLE,"
SAYS PROFESSOR

DEAN EFFINGER DIRECTS
STRUCTORS TO TRY
PLAN

In a remarkably interesting and
lucid address given yesterday in Tap-
pan hall, Prof. Robert M. Yerkes of
Harvard university presented to his
audience some of the current problems
and discoveries in the psychological
aspects of education.
"Children, that psychological tests
prove to be of subnormal intelligence,
are not the ones that fill the h'omes for
incorrigible children," was a sentence
in Prof. Yerkes' talk that struck the
keynote in the development of his
theme. "Some of the children," the
speaker continued, "that had failed to
comply with the social process, when
tested for intelligence, not only proved
to be of normal intelligence, but fre-
quently of a supernormal-and hence
abnormal-plane. These children can
be segregated by tests for their ab-
normal development in instincts.
"When especially precocious chil-
dren are given individual attention,
along with those of subnormal mental
capacity, then education will come into
what is intended that it should.
"In our more or less protracted sys-
tem of education, the average youth
does not choose his profession; he
merely happens into it by chance,"
continued Professor Yerkes, "and
while this is but a vocational sugges-
tion at present, and then only of a
crude sort, there is no limit to what it
may reach in the solution of the social
and economic problems of the future."

IN.

WILL GIVE HONOR
SYSTEM TRILIN
LITERARY COLLEGE

TO TEST SENTIMENT
IN VARIOUS CLASSES
Will Be Used If Two-thirds of Class
Favors Scheme; Supervision
for Those Opposed
In regard to the adoption of the
honor system, Dean John R. Effinger,
of the Literary college, is sending a
letter to professors and instructors
directing them to give the code a trial
according to the plan which the stu-
dent council has formulated.
Those instructors who are willing to
co-operate in giving the honor system
a trial are to take a vote in their
classes by ballot, and in case two-
thirds of the students in any class are
in favor of the plan, it is to be given
a trial. Those students who oppose
the plan in the balloting are to be
given their examination under the old
system in a separate room at the same
time that the honor examination is
taking place.
Incorporated in the dean's letter is
the declaration of principles in regard
to the proposed plan for the Literary
college as drawn up by the student
council. The principles follow:
1. It is not honorable either to give
or receive aid in examinations.
2. Our standards should not be
lowered by countenancing the giving
or receiving of aid by any individuals
among us.
3. It is the duty of all persons upon
seeing any others giving or receiving
aid to remind them of the fact, that by
their own choice they are taking the
examination upon their honor.
Dean Effnger issued the following
instructions which were incorporated
in the letter:
1. Violations of the principles
should be reported to members of the
honor committee, which is to be com-
posed of two members each from the
senior, junior, sophomore and fresh-
man classes appointed by their respec-
tive presidents, and one student coun-
cilman acting as chairman, without
power to vote except in case of dead-
lock.
2. The honor committee will have
full power of investiga'tion and decis-
ion of penalties, subject to the ap-
proval of the faculty, or its commit-
tee appointed to deal with the honor
system.
3. The honor committee, if it so de-
sires, may request the aid of the fac-
ulty in the investigation of cases and
the decision of penalties.
The student council wishes that in-
structors detecting violations of the
above principles, on examining the
blue books, would take up the matter
with the honor committee.
In case the plan is adopted, the let-
ter concludes, instructors are asked
to indicate on their examination re-
ports in what classes it has been tried
and how many in a given class have
refused to accept the honor scheme.
Prof. T. R. Running Talks-at Assembly
At the freshman engineering assem-
bly yesterday, Prof. T. R. Running
talked on the requirements for that
class in the future. Robert Cook,
12011, announced freshmanrhockey
practice at 2:30 o'clock Saturday after-
noon at Weinberg's coliseum.
America to Inspect Belgian Condition
Washington, Jan. 24.-Members of
the American embassy at Berlin will
be instructed to inspect localities in
which deported Belgians are now
living, the state department said to-
day.

men voted against the proposed bill.
A proposition covering cause ques-
tions involved in President Wilson's
"strike prevention program," was pre-
sented to the president this afternoon
by a delegation representing the rail-
road brotherhoods. Details of the prop-
osition supposed to be a compromiseC
were withheld by both the president
and the brotherhood men. It will be
put in written form and laid before the
president for his immediate considera-
tion.
The president appeared at the cap-
itol again today to confer with party
leaders on speeding up the work of
congress.
"Electro Magnets" Subject of Talk
Under the auspices of the A. I. E. E.,
C. R. Underhill, chief engineer of the
Acme Wire company, will speak at
7:30 o'clock tonight in room 348 En-
gineering building. The talk will be
on "Electro Magnets." Throughout the
talk Mr. Underhill will use slides and
experiments. ' This offering is open to
the public.

I

FEW

SIGN HOP LIST

Extend Time on Petition for Over-
flow Party
--
Although only a few students have
signed the paper at the Union, signi-
fying their desire to attend the "Min-
iature J-Hop" to be given on the same
night as the regular arranged affair.
it will be left there for a few days
longer, so as to give every man a
chance to make a final decision.

Every detail of the big party is to
be imitated by the Student co ncil in
the smaller affair. No profit is to be
made o4 the dance whatsoever, in fact
there will be a distinct loss, even if
70 couples attend.
Decorations are to be of an elabor-
ate nature, and programs of a novel
nature will be printed. Tickets will
sell for $4.00 each.

N.
Ir - -

Tickets
25, 35,50
at WA H R'S
until 6 p. m.

Oratorical Association Play
Pill ef m m

Tickets
at
University Hall
7 p.m.

T

O'CLOCK

__ __ __ __ _s__ _1__ __ __ _0; 1

,.U

e

Saturday
Afternoon

N'J " y PTM.'ly

ANNOUNCINCG THE
OF THE
-7Ltilosn Cl

0

An

Annual
J-Hop
Function

Feb. 10

t l
Glee, ; ref;l

u

sm_

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