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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 24, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,
I

C

mm

_ .

A

Full Dress Suits

Calkins

MARTHA WASHINGTON

ALL

CANDIES

$25

$35
Perfect in style and fit

$40

SOCIETY BRAND

Drug

Carried in stock at our

Suits and Overcoats

Co.

South University Ave. Store
Cor. Church St.

1-4 Off

We are showing the very latest in
Furnishings for Evening Wear

i

WE RENT FULL DRESS SUITS

W adhams & Co.

State St.
Arcade

Main and
Washington Sis.

J-HOP FROCKS, OF COURSE-
there isn't a more important thing in view on the campus than
the J-Hop-unless it be examinations!
The dresses we've chosen for it are perfectly beautiful--
beautifully perfect!
THE SHOWING HERE IS TO LAST ONLY A FEW DAYS

Hutzel

s

MAIN AND LIBERTY

I Your Floral Needs==

.1

Are BEST SATISFIED By Us
PIONE 115 '
Cut Flowers Flowering Plants
FLOWERS FOR DECORATION

==COUSINS & H AEL
1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.

GRUEN VERITHIN
WATCHES

$25.08 UPWARDS

HALLER &T ULLER
STATE STREET' JEWELERS

GOVERNMENT BUREAU
DOES VALUALlE WORK
Situated in Law Building, it Helps
Sohlv Mniipal Pro-
lems
Few of the students who daily pass
the Law building know anything about
the existence of the Bureau of Govern-
ment, which is situated on the third
floor of that building, and yet this
office is doing valuable work for Ann
Arbor and the state of Michigan.
Working with the political science de-
partment, and in reality a part of it,
the bureau is interested in municipal
and governmental affairs.
"There are two ways of going at a
piece of work," said Prof. Robert T.
Crane, of the political science depart-
ment, yesterday. "One can start by
making a big splurge and trusting to
luck for the rest, or just the reverse.
We have preferred to take the latter
course."
The bureau has spent most of its
time this year in making a complete
survey of the administrative depart-
ments of Ann Arbor. This informa-
tion is both interesting, and valuable.
The bureau has investigated each de-
partment of the city, and all the re-
ports are typewritten, bound, and put
away for future reference. In the
course of its work the bureau gathers
a large amount of literature on fran-
chises, charters, etc. This material is
all arranged in a form that will make
it convenient for future reference. In-
formation on such matters as city
managers and commission form of
government are to be found there.
Another phase of the work of this
department is that of offering sugges-
tions to those who desire aid, A town,
for instance, would like to kow if it
would be advisable to grant a fran-
chise to private individuals. In most
cases the bureau is able to offer val-
uable suggestions in regard to the
matter in question.
Tle charts which the bureau pre-
pares are often very interesting; one
of these shows the path which an epi-
demic of infantile paralysis took a
few years ago. There are also charts
that show the percentage of increase
in taxes within the last 50 or 60 years.
Advanced students help the work
out by the investigations which they
make during the course of their work
in political science. Their conclu-
sions are, of course, reviewed by the
faculty, and often valuable ideas are
obtained in this way. The'bureau-tries
to confine its work to Michigan, al-
though occasionally it (les some out-
side work.
FORESTERS START A CONTEST
Best Photographs to be Enlarged and
Hung in Club Rooms
Wishing to make the walls of its
club room on the fourth floor of the
Natural Science building more at-
tractive by the use of photographic
enlargements of interesting subjects,
the Forestry club has announced a
contest to start at once and extend to
the beginning of the spring vacation.
Any member of the society may sub-
mit any number of his best pictures,
together with the negatives, by plac-
ing them in a signed and sealed en-
velope and handing them to E. W.
Hartwell, '17. There are no restric-
tions as to the pictures submitted ex-
cept that the prints are to be in black
and white, and the subject of interest
to forestry students.
The three best pictures will be en-
larged, framed and hung in the club
room. A metal plate with the photo-

grapher's name will be attached. All
prints submitted are to become the
property of the club.
February's new records are now on
sale at Allmendinger's Music Shop.
122 E. Liberty St. 20-tf

PROF. HOBBS APPEALS
TO LEAGUEFOR ACTION
Asks National Security Organization
to Ascertain Wilson's Future
Motives
At a meeting of the executive com-
mittee of the National Security
league, held at the Bankers' club in
New York City, Jan. 17, the chairman
laid before the committee a letter
from Prof. William H. Hobbs, of the
geology department, a member of the
committee, calling attention to the
fact that the League was using in its
universal military training literature
a quotation from President Wilson's
message to congress, in December,
1914, declaring in favor "of a citizen-
ary trained and accustomed to arms"
and asking whether the committee
could ascertain what was being done
by the President to give effect to these
views.
It was voted by the committee to
draft a letter to the President asking
him what steps he had taken, if any,
to carry out the suggestion submitted
by him to Congress, and whether he
still held to the views expressed in
the quoted message.
It is the intention of the committee
that the President's reply be read at
the Congress of Constructive Patrio-
tism held in Washington during the
present week and then to publish it
through the country.
ALEADRBERKMAN TO
TALK HERE FEBRUARY 15,

I.

Washtenaw Electric Shop

AT

The Shop of
Ii its not Rigat we

Quality
make it Right
200 East Washington St.

Clothes and Accessories
THE
Varsity Toggery
SHOP
1107 S. University Ave.

Hamilton Business College
State and William

Phone 273

D
. -

NOTED ANARCHIST SPEAKS
DEFENSE OF ACCUSED
BOMB THROWERS

IN

S. WUIERTH CO.
New Day Light Store next to Orpheum

J-HOP

Typewriting
Multigraphing
Mimeopraphing

Electric Auto Heater--Keeps Your Engine Warm
Costs very little to operate

The
Cyc-Carpus Juris
System
PUBLISHED BY
The American Law Book Co.
27 Cedar Street
NEW YORK.

TYPEWRITERS
For Rent or Sale

11

PROF. J. H. LATANE TO %GIVE
COURSE IN INTERNATIONAL LAW
Prof. John H. Latane, of Johns Hop-
kins University, who appeared for the
first time on the summer session fac-
ulty of the University of Michigan five
years ago, will conduct courses in In-
ternational law and history of Amer-
ican diplomacy during the summer ses-
sion of 1917. These courses will be
given through the co-operation of the

TALBOT*
orm [COLLARS
are curve cut to fit the
s oudv7 S pefot y 'egt
Cktctt, cabody &Co.Inc.'akers
American Association for Internation-
al Conciliation, an association co-oper-
ating with a number of summer ses-
sions; tending to better the relations
and understanding between nations.
Last summer through the co-oper-
ation of this association, courses were
given by Assist. Prof. W. L. Schurz
of the department of history, who gave
instruction in South American affairs.
The Michigan Daily for service.

Alexander Berkman, noted anarchist
and editor of the Blast, a journal pub-
lished in San Francisco devoted to the
promulgation of anarchistic doctrines,
will speak on "Crime and Punish'ment"
in Ann Arbor Feb. 15.
Mr. Berkman is touring the central
states in defense of Thomas Mooney
and his four comrades who are sus-
pected as the instigaters of the bomb
explosion which occurred during a
preparedness parade in San Francisco
last July. Bourke Cochran, well-
known criminal lawyer, has volun-
teered his service, without compensa-
tion, to depend the accused.
In the absence of Alexander Berk-
man, the Blast, then edited by Miss
Eleanor Fitzgerald, was raided by As-
sistant District Attorney Edward
Cunha and detectives. Copies of the
magazine were confiscated and will be
used by the attorney in the trial
against the anarchists as well as
against Mr. Berkman, who is accused
of openly threatening President Wil-
son's life.
While in Ann Arbor Mr. Berkman
will tell of the great labor fight now
in progress in San Francisco and will
exhibit the absurd testimonials of the
bribed witnesses which were instru-
mental in sending the suspected to the
penitentiary.
SENIOR LAWS CHANGE DATE
OF ANNUAL CREASE DANCE
The social committee of the senior
law class has changed the date of the
annual crease dance, the largest so-
cial function of the year in the Law
School, from Feb. 22 to sometime later
in the spring. The exact date has not
yet been set, but will probably be dur-
ing the last part of March.
There will, however, be a senior
law dance on Washington's birthday,
as is customary. Further announce-
ments will be made later.
There is opportunity in Michigan
want ads.
I

FLAIYS ASENCE SYSTEM
JUNIOR CRITICIZES PRESENT
METHODS OF COMMiTTEE ON
ATTENDANCE
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
Much dissatisfaction has been ex-
pressed recently in regard to the
method of egcusing absences in the
literary college. Mere criticizing of
an existing institution has never ac-
complished anything, but the con-
structive criticisms, when accompani-
ed by a tentative solution, can be
nothing but a benefit and a step to-
ward improvement.
The majority of the reasons for the
dislike of the procedure of the attend-
ance committee are logical, and seem
to be deserving of serious considera-
tion on the part of Those Who Reign.
A brief resume of the functions of the
attendance committee might serve to
clarify the situation.
After absenting himself, voluntarily
or because of a valid excuse, the de-
linquent student must, within two
weeks, and at a definite stated time,
present himself, together with his ex-
cuse, to the attendance committee.
After waiting for five minutes-or an
hour and a half-depending upon his
luck, he is given a hearing. If ex-
cused or unexcused-no matter-his
card is sent to the instructor involved.
These cards are received by the in-
structor every two weeks, and involve
much research work upon his part to
make the necessary corrections.
The criticisms on the above outlin-
ed system might be summarized as
follows:
There is an overabundance of need-
less and confusing red tape; there is
insufficient time on the part of the
chairman of the attendance committee
to give personal attention and investi-
gation in each case. The delinquent
student often forgets the time and date
of his absences, and must confer with
his instructor in charge. The meet-
ings of the attendance committee often
conflict with the recitation periods of
the student.
As a matter of remedy, it has been
suggested that the student confer di-
rectly with the instructor, who by all
means, is the logical man to grant or
refuse the excuse. To him the per-
sonal habits and the health of the stu-
dent concerned are known; the qual-
ity and consistency of the student's
work in the course are also known to
him: all invaluable things to be'figur-
ed upon in the granting of an excuse.
The University of Virginia, for ex-
ample, has established a system which
puts a premium on the student's at-
tendance. An extra hour is awarded
in the course for perfect attendance.
Three absences are allowed each stu-
dent during the semester's work. If
all three of these are taken, the origin-
al number of hours of credit are grant-
ed, but there is always the ever-pres-
ent inducement for perfect attendance.
Students who have seen this system
work out, say that the number of for-
mer absences has been reduced 99 per
cent, and that greater efficiency and
good will between the student body
and the faculty have been the result.
With the advent of the honor system
should come the advent of more new
methods, and the abolition of the old,

V E; r4 S
100 PENCIL
No matter what course you're
taking you need this famous
pencil!
BECAUSE of the sup-
erlative quality of
material and workman-
ship, VENUS is admit-
tedly the finest pencil
it is possible to make.
If you like a thick ,
soft lead that marks so
that you can read the
writing half way across
the room, choose the soft de-
grees 613-5B-413.
For short-hand notes or easy
writing 3B-2B-B (medium soft)
are popular.
For sketching, gen-
eral writing purposes,
etc., HB-F-H-2H (med-
ium) will prove desir-
able.
For drafting, a med-
ium hard pencil gives
the best results and
you'll like
3H-4H-5H-6H.
For very thin, narrow lines
for extremely accurate graphical
charts, maps, details, etc.,
7H-8H-9H are available.
REE Look for the diin
f te -mark finish on each
of the 17 black degrees and
hard and medium copying.
Your professors will confirm
these statements as to the mer-
its of VENUS pencils.
For sale at the college book
store.
American Lead Pencil Co.
21s Fifth Ave. Dept. DD
New York
Note: Send us your
name and address
and we shall be
~' pleased to have sent
*~ to you for test a box
of VENUS
~ drawing
VENUS
copying
pencil and
VENUS
FREE Eraser
antiquated slip-shod ones of the day
of our grandparents.
JUNIOR.

,

LOST.
LOST-On campus Monday -morning
between 10 and 12, Chemistry note
book. Call C. D. Wiley. 548-M.
Reward. 24-25
LOST-Ladies grey pocket-book be.-
tween Wahr's State St. store and
Felch Park. Return to Daily office.
Box T. 24
LOST-Saturday, January 20, pocket-
book containing three checks. Name
on inside. Reward. Call 1582-J. 23-24
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-The best and least ex-
pensive way of buying, is to let The
Michigan Daily be your medium.
FOR SALE-Mandolin with case. Call
1236-J after 7:00 P. M. 24-26'

WANTED
WANTED-Carpenter work. Furniture
repairing, and odd jobs. First-class
work guaranteed. E. S. Skeels..
Phone 1527-R. 24-26

PRESENT PROMINENT SPEAKERS
IN WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURES
Wesleyan Guild lectures, of the
Methodist church, have been arranged
for the second semester. Included in
the program are the names of several
prominent men, and followers of the
course are assured of an interesting
series of talks.
There will be six out of town speak-
ers who appear as follows: February
11, Charles W. Gilkey, pastor of the
Hyde Park Baptist church, and popu-
lar as a speaker before university stu-
dents in all sections of the country;
February 25, James Schermerhorn,
president and general manager of the
Detroit Times; March 4, Mrs. W. I.
Thomas, social worker and executive
secretary of the Women's Peace Party;
March 25, Thomas Mott Osborn, for-
merly warden of the Sing Sing prison;
April 29, Earnest F. Tittle, pastor of
the Broad Street Methodist Episcopal
church, Columbus, Ohio; May 13, John
M. Killits, United States District
Judge, Toledo.
Flannel Shirts made to order. G. H.
Wild Company. Leading merchant
tailors. State street. tf
For results advertise in The Mich-
igan Daily.

WANTED-To buy visible
for spot cash. E. R. L.
Daily.

typewriter
Michigan
20-tf

WANTED-Two students for help in
kitchen. 614 Monroe St. 23-24
FOR 1R3T
FOR RENT-Exceptionally fine double
front room for two. Forest avenue.
Phone 2239-R. 24-25-26-27
FOR RENT-Two rooms near campus.
Men only. 1105 E. Washington St.
21-23-24

SPECIAL AFTER.INVENTORY SALE
Musical Instruments, Cases etc.

We have a number of New and shop worn VIOLINS-MANDOLINS
GUITARS - BANJO MANDOLINS - CASES etc., which we
have REDUCED TO A REMARKABLY LOW FIGURE! These
bargains must be seen to be appreciated. Look them over.

J

Grinnell Bros.

116 S. MaIw St.
PHONE 1707

pp

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