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January 24, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-24

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unuiI \i l \ bw
PROHIBITION ON FEB 21;
ERO OF MERRIMAC WILL TALKC
UNDER AUSPICES OF ANTI-
SALOON LEAGUE

Alumni to riay
Speaking Records
New York and San Francisco Gradu-
ates to Hear and See Each
Other at Banquets

Captain Richmond P. Hobson, hero Photographic speaking records of
often Merriman, will Hspeak the San Francisco alumni to be played at
of the Merrimac, will speak at th Delmonico's in New York City Friday
First Presbyterian church, Wednesday, evenig, Jn.NrYordsiyFriday
Feb 21 Hi sujec wil b "Dstry-evening, Jan. 26, and records of New
Feb. 21. His subject will be "Destroy- York alumni to be played in the Mer-
Ever since Captain Hobson sunk the chants' Exchange building of San
EericnertheireHofsheSan-thFrancisco will be features of the first
Merrimac under the fire of the Span- annual dinner of the San Francisco
ish forts and ships, his name has beenaal innerfthe SannFrani-o
a household word in America. Since alumni and of the fifteenth annual din-
the pansh-mercan earCapainner of the New York alumni on that
the Spanish-American war Captain dt.Atrbigue tteto
Hobson has served as congressman date., After being used at the two
from Alabaa, his native state.sa banquets the records will be sent to
Since Captain Hobson's entrance the Michigan Union where they will
into congress he has worked for the be given on different occasions.
prohibition cause. He has spoken W. A. Beasly, 92L, will act as toast-
from almost every Chautauqua plat- master at the California banquet. Her-
form in the country and his temper- bert W Clarke, '05, a former presi-
ance addresses have been heard all dnt of the Michigan Union; Senator
over the United States. A. E. Boqynton, '00L, Dean A. 0.
IthIs in connection with the "Dry Leuschner, '88, of the University of
America" rally that Hobson will speak California graduate school, and the
in Ann Arbor. This rally is conducted Hon. Chester Rowell, '88, will be
by the Anti-Saloon League of America among the speakers.
with the co-operation of the state Arrangements for the dinners were

f
JOH
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a
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t
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3
l
7
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1

ing
M(

City News

L,

The northbound interurban car lean-
ig Ann Arbor at 7:10 o'clock in the
corning has been discontinued.
The board of directors of the Civic
ssociation will meet at 4 o'clock to-
ay to discuss various civic affairs
f the city. A representative of the
lichigan Central railroad is expected
> be present to explain proposed rail-.
oad changes.

The Ann Arbor Civic association has
issued the following letter to the city
merchants relative to the blue direc-
tory issued last week by the Ann Ar-
bor Directory company: "The commit-
tee of the Civic association has passed
upon the directory published by the
Ann Arbor Directory company as
legitimate advertising without recom-
mendation as to its value as advertis-
ing, but the directory is not published
under the auspices of the association
and has no further connection with it."
The book is a classified business and
professional directory of Ann Arbor,
giving the names, addresses and tele-
phone numbers of a number of the
merchants of the city.
L. B. Dimond, '16, was elected sec.
retary of the Educators' association
at its meeting held last Monday aft-
etnoon. The other officers elected
were: R. E. Trosper, Jr., president;
H. B. Trosper, vice-president. Among
the new members of the association
who were present Monday are L. B.
Dimond, Judge V. C. Lane, and C. W.
Wagner. The board at the meeting
also declared a six per cent dividend.

STACKS READY APRIL 1

TEMPORARY QUARTERS WILL BE
OCCUPIED ABOUT TEN
MONTHS
Work on the new library stacks has
been progressing rapidly during the
past two weeks, and the contractors
state that unless additional difficulties
are experienced in obtaining materials
this part of the building will be ready
for occupancy by about April 1.
Mr. W. W. Bishop, university li-
brarian, stated yesterday that if the
wings are completed before the spring
vacation, the work of moving the
books and fixtures from the front of
the present building will be done at
that time. The work of razing the part
of the old building now occupied by
the reading rooms, offices and bindery
will be begun as soon as this part of
the building is vacated.
The west wing of the new stacks
will be used as the temporary reading
room, with an entrance at the north-
west corner. The basement of this
wing will be converted into a -tem-
porary reading room for freshman and
sophomore required reading. The
periodical room will be moved to the
second floor of this wing also. The
third and fourth floors will not be oc-
cupied unless the first and second floor
space proves inadequate.
It is expected that the temporary
quarters will be occupied for about ten
months, as the entire building is sched-
uled to be completed by the end of
February, 1918.
800 HARVARD UNDERGRADUATES
PARTICIPATING IN ATHLETICS

league.
Tickets for the lecture will be given
away by the University "Y" during the
few days preceding Hobson's visit.

made by a dross continental telephone
conversation last year when it was
decided to hold the two affairs at the
same time.

HN DREW, WHO APPtARS AT 'i ' \ \ h T EY TEATER, FRIDAY,
FE 13. 2

11

TEUTO RDER TELLS
UTIS OF PTURE
RECOUNTS CAPTURE OF SHIP ANI)
206 PRISONERS BY CREW
OF SEVEN
Berlin, Jan. 23.-Lieutenant Bade-
witz, who became famous by bringing,
in the British steamer "Yarrowdale"
to Swinemunde after that ship had
been captured by a German raider, told
his ,tory of his experiences to a mem-
ber of the official press bureau today.
When Badewitz was asked how he
managed to elude allied warships on
various seas and enter through the
blockade with only 16 members of a
crew and carrying several hundred
prisoners he replied: "For such ac-
tion you only need the necessary cold
blood, especially if you have to deal'
with Englishmen and determined
bluntness. Besides, you need a hand-
ful of smart boys like mine who have
their hearts in the right place and a
Browning (a make of revolver) in
their pockets. Then you can fish the
devil from his own house."
The sailor told his story with becom-
ing modesty. He was a member of the
famous Moewe's crew and previously
performed the feat on the Moewe's
voyage of taking a captured ship into
Teneriffs with prisoners aboard, and
sinking her despite the port's protec-
tion, thus preventing the ship being
used by Germany's enemies. On this
occasion he had a crew of only seven
men to handle the ship and watch 20&
prisoners.
Telling of his voyage to Swine-
munde, Badewitz said: "The captains
of the captured ships which I had on
board were very sensible and did much
in order to keep their men in check.
The prisoners had counted on touch-
ing at Norway. Among the captured
men were six members of the British
navy, of 'whom three belonged to
English armed merchantmen' serving
as gunners."
Questioned as to how he controlled
his strangely mixed cargo of prisoners,
Badewitz replied: "The discipline was
first rate. Whenever the order was is-
sued 'Every down,' the whole crowd
of prisoners hurried to the lower decks
running like hares." Badewick said
he and his 16 men remained all the
time on the bridge with all the prepar-
ations made to sing the Yarrowdale
at a moment's notice. He said all his
crew knew this would have to be done
in case of revolt.
CONTINUE EXAM WEEK RECITALS
School of Music Faculty to Give Twi-{
light Musicals as in Past

Boston Symphony
Appears 5th Time

* * * * * * * * *
AT THE TH EATERS *

Orchestra First Played in Ann
,During Early 90's; Last
Time in 1913

Arbor

r

TODAY
Majestic-Vaudeville.

oi terco legi to
Columbia: rbe freshman are to ha
toques. The little skull caps th
the members of the emerald cla

J

The Boston Symphony orchestra,
which is the most celebrated organiza-
tion of its kind in existence, will make
its fifth appearance in Ann Arbor next
Friday at 8 o'clock.
This select organization first appear-
ed twice in Ann Arbor during the 90's
and again shortly after. It was in 1913
that it -was least heard 'here, this be-
ing one of the last concerts given in
University Hall. On that occasion; as
on previous occasions, University Hall
was filled to overflowing and many
were turned away.
The orchestra consists of approxi-
mately 100 men, each one of whom is a
virtuoso who has been selected for his
particular place. When a vacancy oc-
curs in its ranks the most capable
man is located and immediately se-
cured. Through its pension fund,
whereby retired players are pensioned,
the inducement for accepting a place
in this orchestra's ranks is strong and
little difficulty is experienced in ob-
taining the best men available.
Once a year this organization makes
a short westerntrip.aThis year it left
Boston on Sunday last. Its itinerary
includes Syracuse on Monday night,
Buffalo Tuesday night, Pittsburg Wed-
nesday night, Cleveland Thursday
night, Anmi Arbor Friday night, and
Detroit on Saturday, whence the or-
ganization will return directly to Bos-
ton to continue its regular concerts
there.
Dr. Carl Muck, who conducts the or-
chestra and who is one of the world's
leading conductors and musicians, will
make his first appearance in this city
at this concert.

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irpheum - Marie
"Shadows and
Also comedy.

Osborne in
Sunshine."

It

Arcade-Mary Pickford in "The
ide of the Clan."

* * * * * * * * * * *

at
ss n

AT THE THEATERS

One of the dramatic treats offered
by the present season w l be enjoyed
by an Ann Arbor audience on the even-
ing of Friday, Feb. 2, when John Drew
will appear at the Whitney theater in
"Major Pendennis," a dramatization of
Thackeray's famous novel.
It is said that Langdon Mitchell has
reproduced the spirit and atmosphere
of the great novelist, and has, at the,
same time, provided Mr. Drew with a
character which shows him in an en-
tirely different light from any of the
other justly famous Drew roles.
The lover of Thackeray will have no
difficulty in disassociating Mr. Drew
from the modern drawing room coin-
edies of the past seasons in which he
has starred, and will be wholly de-
lighted in his portrayal of the irascible
but lovable Major Pendennis.
Mr. Drew's admirers, on the other
hand, will contend that the part of the
major aids in no small degree to bring
out the resources of the actor's per-
fect and versatile art. The company
surrounding Mr. Drew is said to sup-
port him ably, and it Is expected that
the production, will be long remem-
bered by those who witness it.

formerly wore, winter and summer,
have been discarded for a toque,
which if not more artistic are at
least better from a humanitarian
standpoint. Upperclassmen are not
as enthusiastic over the innovation
as the first year men. In former
years, it has been a chief source of
amusement to vigoriously thump the
ears of the freshmen when they
were red with the cold. And more-
over, there is a fear that with their
ears covered the freshmen will not
be so likely to hear the good ad-
vice of their older brethern.
Illinois: There are still mnany who
are willing to be martyrs for the
cause of science. The latest enroll-
ed are 40 students in Illinois who
are making experiments in metabol-
ism. To carry on the experiments a
number of them are going to starve,
that is, for a time. To increase the
visibility of the experiments the
thinnest and the fattest members of
the class are relinquishing the food
habit and subsisting on weak tea or
hot water.

d
c
d
i
t

Fire did $4,000 danage to the Whit-
ney theater about 9:30 o'clock yester-
day morning. The origin of the fire
ould not be ascertained. It was first
discovered between the walls separat-
ng the main body of the theater from
he stage near the left hand boxes.

The Michigan Varsity and city bands
will be the guests of honor at the ban-
quet to be held at 7 o'clock this even-
ing at the Armory for the Ann Arbor
soldiers who have returned from the
Mexican border. More than 650 tick-
ets were sold for the affair up to last
night.
ADVANCED MUSIC STUDENTS
TO GIVE RECITAL TOMORROW
Program to Be Given at School of Mu-
sic; Is Open to General
Public
A public recital will be given at the
School of Music tomorrow afternoon
at 4:15 o'clock by advanced students
of the piano, voice,. and violin depart-
ments. The general public is cordially
invited to attend.
The following program will be of-
fered at that time:
Walter's Preislied... Wagner-Wilhelmj
Mildred Sutton

Cambridge, Jan. 23.-Despite the ap-
proaching mid-year examinations, al-
most 800 Harvard men are engaged in
organized athletics, ranging from the
varsity hockey team to the freshman
class in athletics. The varsity sports
of hockey, crew and track are draw-
ing by far the -largest .proportion of
the athletes, but the minor sports are.
also well supported.
Wrestling is becoming more an&
more favored among the Harvard un-
dergraduates, possibly because the'
football coach, Percy Haughton, rec-
ommended it as good training for the
football men. There is a squad of
more than 30 training daily under the,
direction of Coach Sam Anderson and
the prospects in this sport are very',
good.
In fencing and gymnasium the Crim-
son has a promising outlook, but in
swimming a great effort will have to
be made to bring the sport out of the
slump into which it fell last year. Th
number of boxers out ,for individual
glory is larger than last year, but theyt
have not been working long enough tc
show anything.
Minnesota Women Don't Like Bow Tie.
Minneapolis, Jan. 23.-Bow ties ar
not popular with the women students,
of the University of Minnesota. Out of
200 women who were questioned, 197
declared that they did not like them
Rumor has it that the three who ad
mitted liking the bow tie have been
ostracized-by the girls.
Ann Arbor's progressive merchants
use the Michigan Daily as their adver-
tieing medium.

I

Vermont: A course in journalism has
been added to the curriculum at the
University of Vermont. Thirty-six
students, half of them women, have
signed for the course. Work is to
be given in all the fields of business,
management, proof-reading, news
gathering, editorial work, and copy-
editing.
California: California students are
now required to take compulsory
English courses if a paper is turned
in which is found deficient in Eng-
lish. The student is warned when
he is first found to be deficient in
rhetoric, but subsequently, if his
work does not improve, he is report-
ed to the committee on student's
English, and is required to take
work until his English is satisfac-
tory.

Arabesque,
Acherzino................MacDowal
Eva Skelton
Fruhlingstraum,
Scherzino und Weinen.......Schubert
Mrs. Verna H. Luther
Le Coucou....................Daquin
Intermezzo, Op. 117 No. 1......Brahms
Etude Op. 25, No. 9.........Chopin
Alberta F. Miehls
Concerto, A minor (2nd and 3rd
movements) ..................Bach
Clarence H. Post

DR. Ii. T. FISCHELIS TALKS
ON CULTIVATION OF PLANTS

Dr. Robert T. Fischelis, represent-
ing the H. K. Mulford company, man-
ufacturing and biological chemists of
Philadelphia, spoke yesterday on 'The
Cultivation of Medicinal Plants," under
the auspices of the Prescott club at 4
o'clock in the Chemistry building. Dr.
Fischelis stated that the growing of
plants for the production of medicines
is still in the experimental stage, but
that the relative strength of medicinal
properties in plants may be determin-
ed by chemical processes which is a
step in advance of the method of
evaluating medicinal strength by feed-
ing the plants to animals.

HOLD WHITE GOODS SALE
FOR BENEFIT OF CHILDREN

Wo
T
inte
dan
whi
U
for
S-
--

se The Michigan Daily
results.

For J -HOP Time

I have engaged a specialist in Hair Dressing and Marcel
Waving from Detroit to assist me at J-Hop time.
Appointments may be made NOW.

Telephone 296-J.

707 N. University

Want Ada

men's Courses to Meet as Usual
he posture examinations will not
rfere with the regular classes in
cing, swimming and playground,
ch will meet as usual.

Try a Michigan Daily Want Ad.

Manicuring for Ladies and Gentlemen

Beginning Monday, Jan. 29, a series
of five daily twilight recitals will be
given in Hill auditorium by the
School of Music faculty, to which the
general public as well as students of
the School of Music and the University
are cordially invited.
This series will continue the prac-
tice, inaugurated a number of years
ago 'and which has been followed an-
nually, of offering programs of interest
and variety during the week of final
examinations in the University.
On several of the programs the or-
gan will occupy a conspicuous place,
while vocal, piano and violin music
will also be heard.
The Wednesday program will con-
stitute one of the regular faculty con-
certs which was announced for that,

A number of Ann Arbor women
whose children attend the Tappan
school are holding a sale of white
goods in the Hastings Shoppe at 608
Liberty street, which began yesterday
and will continue through today. The
proceeds are to assist in the purchase'
of a phonograph for the school and
also to be applied on a fund for the
playground and sand-piles for the
children. Attractive posters for the
sale have been placed in the dormitor-
ies and sorority houses. Hot choco-
late is being served to customers. Mrs.
C. Walker is in 'charge of the under-
taking.

3 kinds of service

v

STUART WALKER'
PORTMANTEAU
THEATRE
"The Theatre That Comes to You"
PRESENTED BY
Maximilian Elser, Jr. and Russell Janney
AT
PEASE AUDIT ORIUM
YPSILANTI
Y 01 N I GN
In the following Reportory of Unusual and
Imaginative Plays
"The Gods of the Mountains"
"Six Who Pass While the Lentils Boil"
"The Birthday of the Infanta"
Under the Local Auspices of
THE YPSILANTI PLAY ERS
Tickets on sale at WAHR'S State St. #1.00

A LA CARTE

A la Carte service has
always been our spe-
cialty.

WEEKLY BOARD
Our regular meals ex-
cell any 1$5.00 board in
Ann Arbor.
CA'TERING

I

For catering we are
best-equipped.

Use the advertising columns of the
Michigan Daily in order to reach the
best of Ann Arbor's buyers.

R. B. ZEBBS

Tel. 1370-W

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