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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 16, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AI IL IVJ.I .... -iii Jttk' LCii £,

PRESIDENT HTCHINS TO
ADDRESS CLENERS' RLLY
PROF. FILIBEJT ROTH TO SPEAK;
SCHOOL OF MUSIC WILL GIVE
RECITAL FOR FARMERS
President Harry B. Hutchins, Prof.
Filibert Roth of the forestry depart-
ment, and Hon. Grant Slocum will be
the principal speakers at the big
Gleaner rally to be held in this city
next Thursday morning, afternoon,.
and evening in Hill auditorium. It is
expected that a large number of farm-
ers in the vicinity of Ann Arbor and
those interested in farming will be
present. In the morning, a session
for Gleaners only will be held.
Earl V. Moore of the School of Mu-
sic will open the afternoon session
with a selection on the organ. Mayor
E. M. Wurster is to give the address
of .welcome. The response will be
given by Mr. Charles Midgley of Grand
Rapids. Miss Lucia Bellamy of Iona
will render two solos. President
Hutchins and Professor Roth will give
addresses., Mr. R. L. Malloway, as-
sistant supreme secretary of the
Gleaners, will talk on "The New Man
of the Farm." At the conclusion of
the afternoon session, the School of
Music will present a musical program.
In the evening a closed session will
be held for Gleaners only. Teams will
present the work *of the new ritual
with special drills. A prize silver
cup will, be awarded the best degree
team. Hon. Grant Slocum, supreme
secretary and founder of the Gleaners'
association, will give the address.
The Order of Gleaners now has a
membership of more than 65,000 in
Michigan alone. It has an office build-
ing in Detroit worth more than $100,-
00.
COEDUCATION ATTACKED IN
JANUARY ISSUE OF INLANDER
An impeachment of coeducation is
contained in an article by Maurice F.
Dunne, '17L, to appear in the Jan-
uary issue of the Inlander.
Besides Dunne's article, the Inlander
will contain an article by H. B. Tee-
garden, '17, entitled "Other's Experi-
ence in Self-Government," which bears
upon the agitation for the honor sys-
tem. A third article, "The Intercol-
legiate Socialist Society," by S. G.
Ogden, '17L, is a justification of a
campus institution.
Two stories will be contained in the
issue, besides several poems and edi-
torials. The magazine will be out
Jan. 24.
R. Rutledge to Speak at Assembly
Mr. Robert Rutledge will be the
speaker at the senior engneer as-
sembly at 9 o'clock on Thurday. Mr.
Rutledge is the chief engineer of the
Santa Fe railroad. His topic has not]
been announced as yet. There is con-
siderable class business of importance
to come up at this time and a large
attendance is urged by the president
of the class.
Do it now! What! Enroll for that
commercial course at the School of
Shorthand, 711 No. University Ave. 16
SKATING CARNIVAL, Wed., Jan.
17, 7:30 to 10 P. M. Fancy skaters
from Detroit. Weinberg's Coliseum.
Tickets at the Delta, Wahr's and Moe's
Athletic Store. 16
Ann Arbor's progressive merchants
use The Michigan Daily as their ad-
vertising medium.

* * * * * * * * * *
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* AT THE THEATER

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s
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TODAY

Majestic-Vaudeville.

Orpheum-Dorothy Gish in "At-
ta Boy's Last Race." Also Tri-
angle comedy.
Arcade - Mabel Taliaferro in
"The Rise of Susan." Also
Mutt and Jeff cartoon.
* * * * * * * * * * *

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AT THE WHITNEY
"Annette's" Waterfall Scene.
When William Fox read the story
of "A Daughter of the Gods," and de-
termined to create it he came upon
one dubious passage concerning a
waterfall that the clever Annette was
to descend hand-cuffed and ankle-
locked. The idea seemed impossible
for such a "slip of a girl," 1s he called
her, and so the scene was blue-pencil-
ed.
Shortly afterward Miss Kellerman
was going over the script and when
she came to the blue-penciled lines
she said disgustingly, "That's the
way! Somebody's always taking the
joy out of life!"
A few minutes later Mr. Fox turned
to his stenographer and said, "Cable
gram Fox's engineers, Jamaica. Pro-
vide beautiflul fifty-foot waterfall,"
and so Annette was able to do hbrr
perilous stunt.
AT THE WHITNEY
"Fair and Warmer", Avery Hop-
wood's classic farce, which drew-re-
cord-breaking crowds in the city of
New York, will come to Ann Arbor on
Thursday, Jan. 18, at the Whitney
theater. The production is said to be
filled with power to make all kinds
of people laugh, and its success is
compared with that of the melodrama,
"Within the Law."
Many of the New York reviewers,
on the night of its first appearance,
used up all their adjectives in praise
of its hilarity. Month after month it
played in that great metropolis to
capacity houses. It will be presented
here by an excellent cast. r
AT THE WHITNEY
"The Girl Who Smiles," the musical
comedy, which from all reports, is de-
cidely unusual on account of scenic
investure, comes to the Whitney theat-
er next Saturday, Jan. 20, for a mati-
nee and evening performance.
"The Girl Who Smiles," after its
initial hearing at the Lyric in New
York, was taken to the Longacre
theater, where it ran for 200 perform-
ances.
The entire cast and chorus is of the
highest calibre- and the comedy has
been claimed to be superior to any
musical comedy offered in years. The
cast is made up of such prominent
actors as Beth-Groves-Young, Willis
Claire, Betty Barnell, Tom Collins,
Clara Thropp and Geraldine Malone.
The emphatic song hits are "Teach Me
to Smile," "Let Us Dance," "Life Has
Just Begun."
AT THE MAJESTIC
Lovers of songs that jingle, toes that
twinkle, novel costume effects, and all
the other characteristics of a "girl"
show, will find a satisfactory even-
ing's entertainment in "The Winter
Garden Revue" which opened the week
at the Majestic theater last night. The

company, headed by Adele Jason and
Anna Bell, offer a spirited rendering
of some of the season's most popular
melodies.
Competing in merit with the head-
liner is the dainty act presented by the
Five Lyceum Girls with their reper-
troire of violin playing, dancing, and
singing.
"On Their Way to School" is a laugh-
able little skit presented by Lillian
Gonne and Bert Albert.
Scamp and Scamp in a comic acro-
batic act, "Fun in a Barracks," are
worthy of mention as daring perform-
ers on the horizontal bars, while John
P. Reed, black-face comedian, is neith-
er better nor worse than the usual en-
tertainer of the type.
Intercollegiatec
Cornell: The Cornell University Ath-
letic association has extended an in-
vitation to the I. C. A. A. commit-
tee to hold the 1917 intercollegiate
field and track meet at Ithaca.
Oklahoma: Campus vote will decide
upon the honor system issue that
the student council of the University
of Oklahoma is advocating. Students
have the opportunity to speak for
or against the movement in a pub-
lic discussion meeting.
Minnesota: Students of the Univer-
sity of Minnesota have subscribed
$14,134 of the $175,000 fund for the
Y. M. C. A. building. The money has
been raised by teams composed of
students in the university "Y" work.
Yale: All Yale men interested in
aeronautics are eligible to join the
new Yale Aero club which has just
been organized. The club will be
under the supervision of the war de-
partment.
Syracuse: A canvass is now under
way on the University of Syracuse
campus to find out the number of
men who would take military training
if a course were offered.
Illinois: Illinois defeated Northwest-
ern 45 to 17 in the basketball game
played at the University of Illinois
Saturday.
Ohio State: Plans are in the making
for a new stadium at Ohio State
university. The proposed structure
will have a seating capacity of 50,-
000.4
M. L. Taylor Addresses Tryads Tonight
M. L. Taylor, former advertising
manager for Nyal's drug products, will
address the combined Tryads Adver-
tising club and Prescott Pharmic club
in room 162 of the Natural Science
building tonight at 7:30 o'clock. His
address will be along the line of in-
vestigating the market before intro-
ducing a new product, and will have
to do with his personal experience
with the Nyal company.
At this meeting there will also be
a discussion of the conditions under
which members of the Tryads may
elect English 12, a course in business
English and advertising.
For results advertise in The Mich-
igan Daily.

WARNER PROBABLY
LOST FOR TRACK
Hurler Now Convelescing from Pneu-
monia; Expects to Return
Next Month
Edward C. Warner, '18, has been
confined to his home in Buffalo since
the Christmas vacation with pneu-
monia. He is convalescing, but will
not return to college until the begin-
ning of the next semester.
Warner was a member of the Var-
sity track squad last year and per-
formed in the hurdles. During his
first year he represented the freshmen
in this event.
His sickness weakens Michigan's
prospects in track events for there is
doubt whether he will be able to en-
gage in athletics this season.
CHAIRMAN WILCOX CALLS
REPUBLICAN AFTERMATH
New York, Jan. 15.-The Republican
post mortem was formally held today.
Members of the Republican national
executive or campaign committee met
at the call of Chairman William R.
Wilcox specifically to clean up the
loose ends of the campaign which
closed in November.
Actually, the G. 0. P. leader started
the ball rolling for 1920. One of the
propositions considered at today's con-
ference was the adoption of the cam-
paign committee as a permanent aux-
iliary, in order that complete and per-
manent recognition may be accorded
the Progressives who have returned to
,the G. 0. P.
HOPE THEY DON'T WEAR THEIR
NEW TROUSERS AT DANCE
All of the toilers on the southeast
side of the campus are going to stop
their work for a short time tomorrow
night and attend the all-engineer
smoker at the Union. The Camp Davis
choir will be on hand and there will
be talks by Pesident H. B. Hutchings,
Prof. C. E. Riggs and Mr. Robert Rut-
ledge, chief engineer of the Santa Fe
railroad. The program will start at
7:30 o'clock and the tickets may be
obtained at the Technic desk for 25
cents.
Sheriff's Daughter Swallows Pin
Leda Lindenschmidt, 11 years old,
daughter of Sheriff and Mrs. Herman
Lindenschmidt, was taken to the Uni-
versity hospital last Saturday because
of a pin which became lodged in her
throat.
Taxmen Begin Reassessment Work
The state taxmen arrived in Ann
Arbor yesterday to begin work on the
reassessment of Washtenaw county.
Their office will be in the board of
public works office of the city hall.
,D. A. R. to Lunch Thursday Afternoon
A business meeting of the Daugh-
ters of the Revolution of Ann Aror
will be held at 10:30 o'clock Thursday
at the Michigan Union. A luncheon
will be held afterwards.

DR. R. PETERSON TO GIVE SECOND
LECTURE OF SERIES ON HEALTH
The second of a series of lectures
under the auspices of the University
health representatives will be given by
Dr. Ruben Peterson this evening at
7:30 o'clock in the Natural Science
building. The subject of the lecture
is, "Modern Methods for the Proven-
tion of Contagents."
The society plans to meet every sec-
ond Tuesday of the month after the
semester examinations. Many prom-
inent scientific and medical men will
deliver addresses.
Last- year the organization enter-
tained large crowds with lectures from
eminent speakers. The plans drawn
up for this year provide a number of
varied programs.
LATIN-AMERICAN CLUB ELECTS
OFFICERS FOR COFHN( YEAR
At a recent meeting of the Latin-
American club the officers for the
coming year were elected as follows:
President, Jose Hernandez, instruct-
or in Spanish; vice-president, Ernesto
Guzman, '17E; secretary, Guillermo,
Covarrubias, '17E; treasurer, Julio
del Toro, instructor in Spanish.
A few days previous to this meeting,
Prof. R. T. Crane of the economices
department, addressed the club on
"Needs of the South American Coun-
tries." Prof. W. J. Hussey, director
of the observatory, will speak to the
organization at the next monthly
meeting. It is planned to have prom-
inent men on the campus talk at every
regular gathering.
Use the advertising columns of the
Michigan Daily in order to reach the
best of Ann Arbor's buyers.

NEXT YEAR'S FRESHMEN MU
TAKE ATHLETIC TRAI
Bowdoin Faculty Introduces
Boost for Athletics by New
Decision
Brunswick, Me., Jan. 15.--Co
sory athletic training for all fres
will begin at Bowdoin college
fall, according to a vote passed 1
faculty this evening. If the
proves successful it is proposed
to include members of the soph
and possibly the junior classes.
The vote provides that all fret
shall take some form of physical.
ing, three hours each week. Fro
second Monday of the collegiate
until Thanksgiving freshmen
have their choice of track, bas
football, tennis or such other sp
may be offered or regular work
gymnasium. From Thanksgiving
the Christmas vacation regular
nasium work is to be taken, and
that either football, baseball or
may be selected in its place.
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA TO G
SECOND PROGRAM TOMO]

The University Symphony orche
conducted by Mr. Samuel P. Locks
will present its second program o
season tomorrow afternoon at
o'clock in Hill auditorium.
Mr. Anthony J. Whitmire, viol:
will appear as soloist, and will
Mendelssohn's Concerto, Op. 64.
The orchestra, which is comp
largely of students, has been d
unusually good work this year.
Ann Arbor's progressive merel
use The Michigan Daily as their
vertising medium.

19

MID=WINTF R SAL E
Of
Bostonian and Florsheim Footwear
With shoe prices soaring, and many styles costing more tod
at w'holesale than we are asking at retail, it would be folly
reduce the prices of a single pair except that we are ba
overstocked on some lines; and with spring shipments soon c
to arrive we must reduce our prese:'t stjck.

I

I-

CAMPUS BOOTEIRY

Z08 Sr.
State St.

ALLMAND

& FORSYTHE

215
Main

r

A Real Pipe
for
College Men
These are two of the
24 popular shapes in
which you can get the
Stratford
75c and up
W D C Hand Made
$1.00 and up
Each a fine pipe,
with sterling silver ring
'and vulcanite bit.
Leading dealers in
town carry a full as-
sortment. Select your
favorite style.
WM. DEMUTH & CO.
New York.
'{

*ki- - 1 T-FAIi
0 VER 9,151,000
telephones in-
the Bell System en-
able Bell subscribers
to telephone to any
point in- the United -i
States.
Michigan State Telephone Company_
J. J. Kelly, Manager
Telephone 504
-- --k

P. S.-By buying at this sale will enable you to save frc
$1.00 to $2.00 per pair on your spring footwear for withou
doubt prices are going much higher.
Hitting the Hockey Pace
is smooth going for the lad of supple body and
quick decision - qualities that come from
proper food and the right kind 'of habits. A
daily diet of
Shreddecd Wheat
makes a man ready for every test that calls
for physical endurance or mental alertness.
It contains all the muscle - building, brain -
making material in the whole wheat grain
made deliciously appetizing and digestible by
steam-cooking, shredding and baking. It is
the favorite food of students and athletes. It
is on the training table of nearly every college
in the United States and Canada. When
served with milk or cream or with fresh fruits
it is sustaining, nourishing and satisfying.

Genuine
French
Briar

Made only by
The Shredded Wheat Company,

.,,

Niagara Falls, N.

I

.

. C.

AEDEL

Portraits of Character

119 E. LIBERTY
Phone 1911

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