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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 16, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

itV 1~lL
! .1

igh-class work is a natural sequence to having our workrooms on
;remises. With our workrooms all under one roof-all under con-
rated personal supervision, we are able to produce those finished
terpieces of tailors' art, so utterly impossible for the great bulk of
ies.
Your dress suit for the J-Hop should be ordered of us, thus insur-
you the best materials, workmanship, and a knowledge of thirty
-s' experience in manufacturing evening clothes.

G. H. Wild Company
Merchant Tailors

State Street

_..

Now Su~pply of

Laundry Cases

he Slater Book Shop

STOP AT
UTTLE'S
338 S. STATE
Cr sodas and lunches
EORGE BISCH OFF
SL0RIST
ice Cut Flowers and Plants
;hapin St. Ann Arbor, Mich.,
PHONE 809 M

Rowe City Laundry
06 Detroit St
Cash cards save you money
PHONE 457-M
FIRST NATL BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Capital $ioo,ooo Surplus and Profit $65,ooo
DIRECTORS
Wirt Cornwell Waldo M. Abbott
Geo. W. Patterson Harry M. Hawley
S. W. Clarkson Harrison Soule
Fred Schmid D. B. Sutton
E. D. Kinnie

.Y OUR HOME MADE
Vanilla and Chocolate
CREAM WALNUT CARAMELS
We serve lunches and sodas at all hours

The Fountain of Youth
State Street Cor. Liberty

11

|||:

.

We Offer You,
URITY - - SERVICE - - LOCATION
Resources $3,800,000
n Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
n Office--
rthwest Corner Main and Huron
ch Office-
707 North University Ave.
armers & Mechanics Bank
'ers the Best in Modern Banking
CURITY . . - EFFICIENCY
cnt and Pleasant Quarters. You will
ed with Our Service. Two Offices
S. Main St. : : 330 S. State St.
ELSRBOW

109 S. Main St.

I

SPECIAL SUNDAES
LIGHT LUNCHES

Our candies are made in
our own sanitary shop.
3 typewriter from
D. MORRILL
322 South State Street
II furnish you an instruction
roe of charge. You will be a
before you know it.
lomen

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Cars run on Eastern time, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:35 a.
m., 8:ro a. m. and hourly to 7:10 p. M., 9:10
. m.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. nr. and
every two hours to 6:48 p. M.; to Lansing,
8:48 p. i.
Jackson Express Cars-(Local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:48 a. m. and every two hours
to 7:48 P. rm.
Local Cars Eastbound-5:35 a. m ,.6:4 a
m., 7:05 a. m. and every two hours to 7:o5 p
m., 8:05 p. M., 9:05 p. M., 10:50 p. m. to
Ypsilanti only, 9:20 a.i., 9:5o a. M., : P
M., 6:o5 p. i., 11:45 P. im., : r a. i., 1:2.
a. m. To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westpound-6:o; a. M., 7:5o a
m., 10:20 p. M.. I2:2 a. m.-
Takes Pictures
Develops Films
makes Prints
and Enlarge-
ments.
713 . VNIVERSITY
TEACHERS WANTED
THE WEST offers you excellent salaries,
good systems, and opportunities foradvance-
ment. We have more calls for first class teach-
ers than we can fill. Yearly elections frequent-
ly occur as early as February. Enroll now so
that we may get your references catalogued.
Write at once to
GRAHAM TEACHER'S AGENCY
Pocatello, Idaho.
THANS STAFF OF PLAY
J. RALEIGH NELSON EXPRESSES
APPRECIATION FOR AID IN
;LAY PRODUCTION
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
If the cast of the Magic Carpet were
not so large, I should certainly feel
it a great pleasure to express to each
one personally my appreciation of the
loyal and enthusiastic support they
have given me in the production of
the play. As I cannot do that, I take
this means of thanking them. The
weeks I worked with them will al-
ways remain a pleasant memory. I
wish also to acknowledge my very
great obligation to Miss Evans for her
hearty co-operation and her contri-
bution of the dances which added so
greatly to the production, I am sure
that no one ever took a task like this
with a more efficient and level-headed
group of men as his co-Workers, such
men as King, Adams, Curby, and
Reeder, could hardly fail to make a
success of any enterprise with which
they put their splendid ability. Even
Gornetsky's name on the program was
enough to assure the success of the
music. I regret that through a mis-
take the names of his men who did
so much to get the show across, were
omitted from our program. By no
means the least of my obligations is
to Mr. Houff, the chief electrician, Mr.
Pardan, the chief carpenter, and Mr.
Heaton, the chief janitor, for their pat-
ience with us in all the problems we
created in their work, and the intelli-
gent and efficient way in which they
helped us solve our difficulties. To all
those who gave me their co-operation
in the presentation of the Magic Car-
pet, I express my deep appreciation.
J. RALEIGH NELSON.
For results advertise in the Mich-
gan Daily.

Official newspaper at the University of
Mr:.gan. Published every morning except
M.nday during the university year.
-Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
)lffe,: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier $.50; by mail,,$300.
Want ad. stations: 6uarry's ;Students' Sup-
ply Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 244.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker..........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh....Business Manager
Conrad N. Church..............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn............... .City Editor
Harold..Fitzgerald.........Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor
Verne E. Burnett...........Associate Editor
Golda Ginsburg............Women's Editor
Carleton W. Reade........Statistical Editor
Marian Wilson............. Literary Editor
. Cam pbell...Assistant Business Manger
SPhilip Fmery..Assitant Business Manager
Albert hi Hone. . Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau.. Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter.. .Assistant Business Manager
J. L. Stadeker Night Editors .L.eiglr
C. M. Jickling H. M. Carey
B. A. Swaney L. W. Nieter
L. S. Thompson E. A. Bamgarth
W. 'A. Atlas * Reporters Allen Shoenfied
H. C. Garrison C. L. Roeser
C. S. Clark D. S. Rood
R. H. Fricken G. 0. Brophy
B. I. Millar F. A. Taber
D. H. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
K. L. Wehmeyer _ J. P. Hart
Annetta L. Wood J. C. Martin
T. F. McAllister
Business Staff
Bernard Wohl J. E. Robinson
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Earl F. Ganshow
Walter R. Payne Jackson W. Smart
Seymour B. Wilson
TUESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1917.
Night Editor-B. A. Swaney
WHAT THE HONOR VOTE MEANS
Michigan students have a grave
duty to perform today. They are to
decide by ballot whether or not they
desire to see an honor system adopted
in the various schools and colleges
where it is not now in use. The vot-
ing has been so arranged as to re-
quire very little physical effort on the
student's part. But his duty does not
end with the mere voting. A serious
question in University life has been
referred to the student for decision.
It deserves careful, deliberative con-
sideration. The factor of greatest im-
portance in a referendum vote of this
kind is not whether the particular is
sue is won or lost, but whether all
of those interested have given it care-
ful consideration, and have cast their
ballots. Think it over. And then
vote.
WHAT IS A COLLEGE STUDENT?
Most of us can remember the time
when the college student was a gaily
dressed person who early adopted a
pipe bearing strange insignia and al-
lowed himself to be led about by a
bull dog, stopping occasionally to
give vent to a lusty rah, rah for some-
thing.
There has been a mighty change in
this person. He no longer feels under
obligation to -live up to the comic
supplement ideal. The tendency with
regard to personal appearance seems
to be toward a more conservative
mood, and that other great comple-
.ent of college life, hazing, is also
disappearing rapidly.
What is the reason? We think it
is that the college student has ceased
to- be quite such a rarity. Every-
body goes to college now. There are
tens of thousands of degrees handed

out every June and the number is
constantly increasing. And with re-
gard to all this there is something
that most of us should keep in mind.
With competition keener in every
line of business it behooves the col-
lege student to get a few of the things
that others are missing. The man
who blunders his way through the
University along with hundreds of
others is not very far ahead when he
is through. For that reason the "fore-
handed" person will ask himself if he
is making the most of his time.
Thirteen days to examinations.
How unlucky.
Someone asked if the scarcity of
German dyes has any effect on blue-
book blues.

you select the prettiest girl for a
dancing partner, you are non compos.
We certainly are a crazy lot,
BOOKS WORTH REAING
PATRIOTS IN THE MAKING, by Jon-
athan French Scott. Appletons, New
York.
One of the direct effects which the
,war in Europe has had upon the peo-
ple of America is the greater attention
paid to the problems of national pre-
paredness. Not onlyhas this problem
been agitated by military experts,
but it has been considered in its rela-
tion to the education of the coming
generation.
As Mr. Scott explains in his book,,
"National consciousness expresses it-
self through the school as perhaps
through no other institution. From
the school, therefore, far more than
from the opinion of individual writ-
ers, one can learn what the factors
dominant in the life of the country
really are."
Using this as the keynote for his dis-
cussion, Mr. Scott makes a careful
analysis of the teaching of patriotism
in the schools of France, and the ex-
treme race consciousness of Germany
as it is bred into the nation through
its educational system. The differ-
ence in this almost unconscious patri-
otic education of the two countries ac-
counts for the differences existing be-
tween the active political ideals of the
two countries.
The possibilities of teaching patri-
otism in the schools of the United
States are greatly aided by the uni-
versality of education in this country.
But not only may we teach prepared-
ness for war in our schools, but we
may teach preparedness for peace. "As
the school of yesterday has fertilized
the soil from which have sprung na-
tional suspicions and hatreds, so may
the school of tomorrow usher in the
brotherhood of man, of universal
peace."~
Though much of the'discussion of
Mr. Scott's book concerns patriotism
as it is eventually applied to the armed
defense of a nation, the tone of the
book is really one of peace. The ma-
terial is historically interesting and
the manner of treating it is good. Of
greater = value than this, however, is
the suggestion of future educational
forces which shall breed the doctrines
of peace into the entire nation through
its public schools.
New Way Open to Harassed Fair Ones
Atlanta, Ga., Jan. 15.-In the activ-
ities of the postmaster campaign for
recruits for the United States marine
corps, the first person to receive the
$5.00 reward for the securing of a
recruit for the "soldiers of the sea"
was a woman, Miss Mary Rudihil,
handler of the mpails in Forsyth, Ga.,
who enlisted Richard Lewis Ponder
of that place.

ADELPHI TO DEBATE ABOLITION
OF ELECTORAL COLLEGE SYSTEM
Members of the Adelphi house of
,representatives will meet at 7:30
o'clock tonight in the Adelphi rooms
to discuss an amendment to the feder-
al constitution, providing for the abol-
ition of the electoral college and substi-
tuting in its stead the election of the
president and vice-president by a
popular vote of the people of the sev-
eral states.
The party system, recently adopted
by the society, will for the first time
in the history of the Adelphi, play an
important part in the discussion of
the proposed amendment, which has
been introduced by the Democratic
party of the house.
Come and Bring a Dictionary Along
The Zoological Journal club will
meet in room 231 of -the Zoological
laboratory, tomorrow evening at 7:15
o'clock. At this meeting reports will
be read on entomological literature,
Dr. R. W. Hegner reading the -first
paper on "General Entomology, and
Dr. Hubbell the second on "Applied
Entomology."
Members of group B will report on
Comparative Anatomy, Histology, Cy-
tology, Embryology, Physicology, An-
imal Behavior, Ecology, and Zoocio-
graphy. Persons interested in the
program are invited.
You'll surely regret it some day if
you fail to enroll now for a course in
commercial branches at the School of
Shorthand, 711 No. University Ave. 16

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1000 JOBS
IN THE LAST
100 DAYS
Tihis is the report up to
date of the "Y"rEmploy-
ment Bureau.
Cleaning, window wash-
ing, dog washing, snow
shovelling, board jobs,
room jobs, clerking, trade
jobs, even acting as Santa
Clause are some of the
jobs embraced by this re-
port.
Bureau open daily from
3 to 6 p. m. and Saturday
mornings. Telephone $23.

F LAN DERS
O R
FLOWERS
PHONE 294 213 E.Liberty St.
Member of Florists' Telegraph
Delivery Service
Flowers by Wire to All thne World.

jLittle I.C.S. Gianxts l
&i
Handbooks of Practical Information for
--
22 Books in the Set -50 cents each
Ask to see them at
--
- m -
13
- UIVESIY BOK-O -
n fol ks changed their
/ i-r'mfnts they'd
be e'1 r- - A e ~"A.W L those
y ur- "r- ::r .. -

Think Ahead!

ylu§. will meet at 7:30 o'clock to-
t with Sarah Hincks, grad., at 311
S. Fifth street.
te series of teas to be given by
Advisory council of the' Women's
ue has been postponed until the
nd semester. .

The Michigan Daily for service.

Wehveacmpee tc

here will be no war relief work at
gymnasium today.
eague house heads will meet at
per, instead of at luncheon, at
D o'clock, Wednesday afternoon, at
bour gymnasium. Each house is
acted to send a representative, who
o bring her faculty list and the
tey collected.
lee club will rehearse at 5 o'clock

: I

We have a complete stock
of
'Columbia
Grafanolas

These are the days when care
of your figure will count as the
years go by.
For your figure the- corset is
responsible.
will take care of your figure
today-tomorrow-and in the
days to come you will retain
your youthful lines.
Take the necessary time for a
careful fitting.

afternoon
. hall.

in Sarrah Caswell

The Best Grade of all
Stringed Instruments

o you wish to teach commercial)
niches? No better course in the
ntry than is offered at the School
Shorthand, 711 No. University Ave.
sses just beginning. 16
KATING CARNIVAL, Wed., Jan.
7:30 to 10 P. M. Fancy skaters
n Detroit. Weinberg's Coliseum.
kets at the Delta,'Wahr's and Moe's
letic Store. . 161

-

The honor system wouldn't
question if -final examinations
eliminated.

be a
were

Hear the Latest Dance
Records

The latest thing in thrill producers
seems to be life in New Jersey.
It must be due to the fact that
Thaws are not expected this time of
year that they break into the head-
lines.
A Baltimore alienist says that . if

12-inch size

- $1.00

$3 and up
For Sale by

ALLMENDINGER
MUSIC SHOP

,1ACrk 6"&"

Phone 1692

122 E. Liberty St.

Want Ad.

low

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