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January 16, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-16

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SNOW AND
COLDER

~~Av

4)aiWIskA

UNITED PRESS
DAY ANI) NI(T
WIRE SER~V1CE

VOL. XXVII. No. 78. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1917. PRIC FIVE CENT

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i i

LAWSON INVOLES
CANT MEMBERS
IN LEAK INQUIR
DRAGS IN M'ADOO, LANSING, AND
AMBASSADOR VON BERN-
STORFF
DECLARES CHAIRMAN
HENRY STATED NAMES
Committee Head Denies Charge; Says
Secretary of State Named
No One to Him
By J. P. YODER
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, Jan. 15.-More big
names were flashed into the house note
leak hearing this afternoon. They
were Secretary of the Treasury Mc-
Adoo, Secretary of State Lansing, and
German Ambassador von Bernstorff,
and the names of Presidential Secre-
tary Tumulty, Paul Warburg of the
federal reserve board, Barney Baruch
and others, were again dragged in.
To cap the climax of an afternoon
of sensation, Thomas W. Lawson, who
was doing all the naming, declared
that Representative Henry. chairman
of the investigating committee, him-
self mentioned the name of a cabinet
member to Lawson in connection with
the leak. This cabinet member, Law-
son said, spread to Wall street the in-
formation that the note was in prep-
aration before it was made public.
Berstorff Made $2,000,000
Lawson declared Henry said the
committee had heard that the "Ger-
man ambassador had profitted over
$2,000,000 in the leak." In no case did
Lawson profess to have direct knowl-
edge. Henry later violently denid
from the stand that he had named any
cabinet member as stated by Lawson.
On a woman's say so, Lawson named
Reporter Price of the Washington Star
as go between for Tumulty and others
in leak deals. He likewise named two
big bankers, one as telling him about
a big leak deal, the other being named
as actually in on the play.
' Recounting a conversation with
Chairman Henry, Lawson said the lat-
ter had told him of hearing that Lan-
sing had consulted with Baruch in
New York. Lawson said he doubted
Lansing's alleged visits to New York
had any suspicious aspects. Moreover
he doubted that Lansing or the Ger-
man ambassador had any hand in the
situation.
Henry Says Lansing Named No One.
Henry took the stand, and said he
had' absolved Lansing from any confi-
dence regarding their talk. "I asked
him over and over again to name one
person connected with this leak and
he named no one, and I say to you
that I named no cabinet official in that
three-hour session, as Mr. Lawson has
stated," said Henry. Lawson said
Henry had left the impression that the
cabinet man was "fully as close to
the leak as if he had speculated him-
self."
Lawson's naming of Henry came as
(Continued on Page Six.)
FOUR DIE IN STORM
Children Frozen to Death When They
Leave School in Blizzard
Winnipeg, Jan. 15.-The bodies of
four school children were found frozen
to death early today near Cadillac,
Saskatchewan. Two little boys were

allowed to leave school Friday after-
noon during a terrible blizzard.
Their sister, aged 14, went in search
and a fourth child also left the build-
ing. All perished on the prairie.
When found, the older girl had two of
the boys in her arms and the fourth
child was found a short distance away.
Three were children of Ovide Besch-
ants,

Admiral Dewey 's
Death Imminent
Hope for Life of Distinguished Naval
Hero Given Up By His Phy.-
sican
Washington, Jan. 15.-At 3 o'clock
this afternoon Admiral Dewey's phy-
sician announced his distinguished
patient's condition as "rapidly sink-
ing." It was said death was expect-
ed momentarily. The famous hero of
Manila Bay has been ill at his, home
here for several days. There was no
change in Admiral Dewey's condition
early in the evening, it was announced
by his son.
George Dewey gave American naval
history an historic phrase ranking
with Perry's "Don't give up the ship,"
and Farragut's "Damn the torpedoes,"
when at Manila Bay, on May 1, 1898,
he told his captain of the Olympia,
"You may fire when ready, Gridley."
A Hero of American History
That utterance coming in the quiet
way that Dewey always spoke, herald-
ed the beginning of the battle of Man-
ila Bay, the first imporant naval en-
gagement in which the American navy
had participated since the war of 1812.
It established Dewey as one of the
American heroes of history. It brought
him back to the United States in 1899
as the nation's man of the hour and
this at a time when there were plenty
of other heroes of only slightly lesser
degree who had achieved proud dis-
tinction in the Spanish-American war.
He was acclaimed in1a triumphal re-
ception at Washington which surpass-
ed any ovation ever before accorded
an American and the people presented
the hero of Manila Bay with a home in
Washington on historic Rhode Island
avenue, the contributions for the
most part being small individual sub-
scriptions.
Made Admiral of the Navy
Even staid officialdom was prone to
share the public's view of Commodore
Dewey's achievement at Manila and
immediately on receipt of his message
of victory he was created a rear ad-
miral and thanked by congress. One
year later, when Dewey would ordin-
arily have been retired because he had
reached the age limit, he was instead
made admiral of the navy, the first
time such rank had been granted since
the days of Farragut.
Since that time Dewey has been
head of the general board of the navy,
a silent but potent influence in
strengthening America's sea forces.
The plans which are designed by 1925
to make the American navy second to
none in the world, the specifications
by which America is now building the
greatest warships in the world, all are
the fruits of Dewey's hard work of the
past few years, hard work that weak-
ened him.
Graduate From Naval Academy
Dewey was born, Dec. 26, 1837, and
entered the navy academy in his early
youth, graduating in 1858. He com-
manded the steam sloop Mississippi in
Farragut's passage to New Orleans.
He had wide sea experience all over
the world after the Civil war.
The Washington public has known
Dewey as a white mustached, benign
soft spoken, old gentleman who every
day, rain or shine, took a drive in the
parks behind one of the few remain-
ing pairs of perfectly matched horses
that are left in the city. He never
could bring himself to automobiles,
and his horses and a great dog which
was his constant companion have been
familiar figures.

Lee Richardson, '17, Injured Skiing
Lee Richardson, '17, sustained what
may be serious injuries when he fell
while skiiing on the boulevard Sunday
afternoon. At present Richardson is
confined in the St. Joseph's hospital.
An X-ray was taken this afternoon
and as soon as a development of the
plate has been made, the physicians
will know whether or not his condition
is extremely serious.

WILL PROVIDE RED
ILIGHTS TO MAKE
HURON RIVER SAVE
E. J. COPE, MANAGER OF EDISON
COMPANY, W{4ILL AID PROJECT
IF STUDENTS HELP
CIVIC ASSOCIATION
WILL CO-OPERATE
$50 Will Make River Safe for Skating
Purposes and Hire Man
for Guard

Council Advocates Honor System
To the Students of the University of Michigan :
It is with the belief that a greater spirit of honor in examina-
tions will be of benefit to the University, and a great step forward,
the Student council, in collaboration with The Michigan Daily and
several of the campus societies, has undertaken the present move-
ment.
The council does not desire to Impose a specific honor system
on each and every school and college, but rather wishes to help each
individual of the University make every other individual with whom
he comes in contact see the value and Importance of the ideal or
spirit of honor. There exists, we think, too much of the feeling, or
fear, by the individual that, although as far as he is concerned he
would like to see an honor system adopted, and would support it,
that there .are not enough others who feel exactly the same way
about the matter.
If all men and women voting on the question today will bear
in mind that the large majority of the other students are with as high
a moral character as their own, we have no fear for the out come
of the ballot.
As for the exact nature of the system to be followed, that is a
matter of comparatively minor detail. Just how, and by whom the
honor committees shall be composed, can be easily decided individ-
ually by the separate schools and colleges.
It is a greater honor spirit that is needed. Whether we shall
have that is up to the students voting today.
THE STUDENT COUNCIL.

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Nearly every winter some one
is drowned while skating on the
Huron river. With an idea of
putting an end to this needless
loss of life, The Michigan Daily
has started a campaign to pre-
vent such accidents in the fut-
ure.

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The opening gun of the Michigan
Daily campaign to safeguard the Hur-
on river for skating purposes was fired
yesterday when Mr. E. J. Cope, man-
ager of the Ann Arbor office of the
Edison Electric company, promised to
place red lights along dangerous
places near the dams of the company
and to furnish electricity free of
cnarge for them. The lights will bG
placed in position as soon as enough
spirit is shown by the students of the
University and Ann Arbor citizens to
show that the rest of the work neces-
sary to make the river safe for skaters
will be carried out.
Nearly every year for the past ten
years, at least one person has been
drowned while skating on the Huron
river. Many recall the death of Har-
old Korn, '17L, last year in the waters
of the Huron. Floyd Young. '16L, his
companion at the time of the accident,
was forced to go almost a mile before
he could secure suitable material to
help draw Korn out of the icy waters.
By that time Korn was so weak from.
exposure that he could not help him-
self onto the plank that Young ex-
tended to him and so went down. A.
Mr. Neff, who heard the cries of the
two frenzied students, was forced to
go way to the boat house before he
could telephone the police station for
help.
Says Civic Association Will Heip.
"I am sure that the Ann Arbor
Civic association will co-operate in the
matter," said Mr. H. W. Douglas, presi-
dent of that organization, when in-
terviewed yesterday. "It is a matter
that I have been going to bring up for
some time. I believe that the drown-
ings that have occurred on the Huron
river can be stopped. There are a
number of persons who skate on the
river and we ought to guard them
against the dangerous places. I will
appoint a committee to investigate
what would be the best method to
safeguard the skaters and everything
that we can do in the matter, we will
do."
$50 WIll Make River Safe.
It is the belief of the men who are
behind the movement that $50 would
pay nearly all the necessary expenses
to make the river safe for skating pur-
poses. Signs could .be placed at all
dangerous places warning the skaters
of thin ice, holes, etc. With this
money, a man could be secured to pa-
trol the river, keep track of the dan-
gerous places, test the ice, and keep
the rescuing apparatus in order.
An appeal will be made soon to the
student body for funds to carry on
the work.
At the meeting of the student coun-
cil next Thursday evening, the move-
ment will be discussed and definite ac-
tion will probably be taken concerning
the matter, according to Grant Cook,
'17L, president.

COURSE NOT RESTRICTED'
TO LITS AND ENGINEERS
MASON LYONS, '192K, SAYS OTHER
COLLEGES CAN GET CREDIT
FOR MILITARY TRAINING
"The military training corps is not
restricted to members of the Literary
and Engineering colleges, as seems to
be the popular opinion," said Mason
Lyons, '19M, captain of the University
military corps, when interviewed yes-
terday. "Although provision has been
made only for credit for the two col-
leggs, if enough men of the other col-
leges would signify their intention of'
joining the corps, credit would no'
doubt be provided for them. Three
hours credit will be given for each
semester of military training work and
two hours for the course at Plattsburg.
Although nearly 100 students, the
amount necessary to establish a mili-
tary science course in the University,
have entered into the movement al-
ready, a campaign for more members
has been started by the officers of the
local company. A man will be sta-
tioned near the trophy room of the
gymnasium from 3:30 to 5:30 o'clock
this afternoon and tomorrow afternoon
to explain the course to any students
who are interested in the movement.
A meeting of all the officers, both
commissioned and non-commissioned,
will be held in the trophy room of the
gymnasium at 5 o'clock this afternoon.
Today is the last chance to return
election cards. Owing to the necessity
of having 100 cards in by tonight, all
those in favor of the project are urged
to comply with the directions as soon
as possible. Engineers will turn I-n
their cards to Dean Cooley's office and
the lits to Dean Effinger's office.
MAP OUT YOUR LIFE ADVISES
DR. STEPHEN S. WISE IN SERMON
"Life cannot be lived except by those
who map out life in advance," was the
keynote which Dr. Stephen S. Wise,
rabbi of the Free synagogue of New
York City, struck in his address at the
union services held in Hill auditorium
last Sunday night.
Dr. Wise urged young people to pre-
pare for the future while there is yet
time, as in old age they will find out
that their lives. are what they have
mapped out in youth. "Old people are
discontented," said the preacher, "be-
cause they failed to plan their lives in
younger days."

1 . DIES AT
HOSILSUNDAY MORN
ATTACK OF INTESTINAL OBSTRUC-
TION BRINGS END AFTER
OPERATION FAILS
Lytton D. Gamble, '20, of Coldwater,
Michigan, succumbed to a serious at-
tack of intestinal obstruction, follow-
ed by an operation, at the Homeopath-
ic hospital early Sunday morning.
Gamble was the son of Dr. Gamble, as
prominent physician of Coldwater.
Since last Tuesday, Gamble was
confined to the hospital and his par-
ents and brother were at his bedside
during his confinement there.
The operation was 'performed on
Tuesday, when it was found that that.
would be the only means of giving the
patient relief. His condition, how-
ever, grew worse after the operation
and early Sunday morning Gamble
succumbed. His body has been re-
moved to Coldwater, where burial will
take place.
REGENTS WILL MEET FRIDAY;
PRESENT REPORT ON TRAINING
The regents of the University will
hold their regular meeting next Fri-
day in the regent's room in the Law
building. At this meeting President
Harry B. Hutchins will submit a re-
port on the matter of military training,
which will include information re-
garding the application of students to
elect military training under an army
officer to be detailed here by the war
department.
WANTS $12,000,000 TO EQUIP
NAVY YARD WITH FACTORIES
Daniels Plans to Have Navy Yards
Build One-Third of Ships
Washington, Jan. 15.-Secretary of
the Navy Daniels plans to equip navy
yards so that they can build one-
third of all ships and manufacture 'one-
third of all necessary munitions all
the time. Two-thirds of manufactur-
ers and builders demand "unreason-
able prices" for everything the navy
needs, he told the house navy commit-
tee today. "I want to see the time
when there will be no incentive for
making profits in preparing this coun-
try for war," Daniels said. "It is a
dangerous situation for the nation."
Daniels appeared to ask an additional
X12,000,000 appropriation for equipping
navy yards..

CAMPUS VOTE TIPS
SCALES IN HONOR
STUDENT 31-AJORITY PLUS FAC-
ULTY ASSENT MEANS
GREATING BAN
VERDICT MAY INVOLVE
APPROACHING EXAMS
Student Council Sends Final Appeal;
Emphasise Unimportance
of Details
All students in those colleges and
schools of the University which have
not yet adopted the honor system for
examinations will have an opportunity
today to signify their opinions of the
proposed innovation.
Early this morning ballots will be
placed in every room on the campus,
with the exception of those entirely
devoted to nees and engineers. The
ballots will be distributed in every
class held in that room throughout the
day.
If the proposed plan is adopted,
there will be no set of arbitrary rules
involved in the application of such a
system. Every student taking an ex-
amination is not to be sworn to a
policy of watchful waiting for wrong-
doing on the part of his neighbors. He
is to watch himself mainly, but he
may also remind his neighbor that
he'is to do likewise.
Vote Note Necessarily Decisive.
The vote today is by no means de-
cisive of the absolute introduction of
the honor system, even if the majority
of the ballots cast indicate a willing-
ness on the part of the students to
take examinations in the future under
a freedom from faculty mentors. The
proposition must be passed on favor-
ably by the faculty of each department
before that department as a whole will
come under the honor system. Yet,
from the answers of mpost of the de-
partmental heads when asked concern-
ing the matter, it is almost certain that
a favorable attitude by the students
will cause the inauguration of the plan
in time for the coming semester exam-
inations.
Professors and instructors are re-
quested to see that the ballots are dis-
tributed and collected, and students in
voting are asked to answer all four
questions.
FAIL TO SAVE SHIP
AGROUND 48 HOURS
All Hope of Floating Cruiser Milwa-
kee Abandoned After Inspec.
Lion by Engineer
Eureka, Cal., Jan. 15.-Hope of float-
ing the cruiser Milwaukee, around in
the surf near Samoa, was virtually
abandoned today. Although the ship
has been on the sands but 48 hours,
she is beginning to break up.
With Lieutenant W. S. Newton, come
mander of the Milwaukee, an expert
engineer made a visit to the stranded
cruiser and penetrated all sections of
the vessel. They returned with the,
message that there is no possibility of
getting the vessel oiL, and she will
pitch and plunge until she goes to
pieces.
The 17 officers and 317 men on
board the vessel when she struck have

all been safely landed by means of a
breeches buoy.
Dean Schlotterbeck's Condition Better
;It was learned today that the condi-
tion of Dean J. 0. Schlotterbeck of Lhe
College of Pharmacy is generally
much improved and that he is resting
comfortably at St. Joseph's hospital
where he underwent an operation dur-
ing the recent holidays.

N -

TONIGHT

"Jeu do I'Amour et Du Hazard" and "L'Etincelle" by

8:00 p. m.
JAN. 16

The

French

Players
Today PRICES: 50, 75, $1

arah
Angell Hall

SEAT SALE AT WAHR'S 10:00-12:00 and 2:00-6:00 1

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