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December 13, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FOR ANN ARBOR-
WEDNESDAY-COLDER; PROB-
ABLY SNOW

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UNITED PRESS WIR
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICI
TIlE ONLY MORNING PAPER
ANN ARBOR

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VOL. XXVII. No. 62.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1916.

PRICE FIVE

PROF KNOWLTON
DIES FOLLOWING
3 DAYS' ILLNESS

RSIALL PROFESSOR OF
SUCCUMBS LATE LAST
NIGHT

LW1 W

KNOWN AS LEGAL AUTHORITY
Active Member of University Faculty
From 1885 U1til His
Death
Jerome , Cyril Knowlton, Marshall
professor of law, died at 10 o'clock
last night at his home following a
severe attack of lumbago. Physicians
report that the immediate cause of his
death' was cerebral embolism. Tomor-
row would have been his sixty-sixth
birthday.
Professor Knowlton was the oldest
man in point of service in the Law
school. He joined the faculty in 1885
and was actively connected with the
school until his death. He was taken
ill Saturday night. He attended the
faculty luncheon Friday afternoon and,
although suffering from a cold,
planned to resume his work Monday

President Lauds
Prof. Knowlton
"I have known Professor
Knowlton for many years. As
long ago as 1874, when I was a
teacher in the Literary depart-
ment of the University, he was
under ine as a student. I was
connected with the law faculty
in 1885, when he became a mem-
ber of the Law school.
"Our friendship during these
years has been most intimate.
Professor Knowlton was a great
law teacher. He has influenced
thousands of students. His gen-
ial nature and thorough under-
staniling of the needs of stu-
dents made him particularly ef-
fective in the class room. The
loss to the Law school is great.
He will be sadly missed.
"His death is a great person-
al loss to me for during the
many years of our acquaintance,
our association was most inti-
mate."
PRES. HARRY B. HUTCHINS.
JUNIORS SELECT FIVE J-HOP
COMMITTEEMEN YESTERDAY

GCODFELLDV LECTURE
TO BE GIN TONI6HTi
Couipilttee to Collect Old Clothes for
Poor from Fraternities Be-
fore Vacation
"Picturesque America," the Goodfel-
low lecture which will be given by
Norman B. Conger of the Detroit
weather bureau and Mr. George R.
Swa:i of the Latin department in
University hall auditorium tonight,
wll begin promptly at 8 o'clock.
Mr. Swain spent a year in Montana
before coming to Michigan and one
summer, camera in hand, he tramped
750 miles in British Columbia along
and near the line of the Canadian Pa-
cifc railway, thus obtaining many,
wonderful views of -mountain scenery.
On Monday and Tuesday of next
week E. B. Palmer, '17, assisted by a
committee, will call at every fraternity
in Ann Arbor to collect the boxes of
old clothing and shoes which the vari-
ous houses will put aside for the Good-
fellows.

Peace Orators to
Debatein Contest
Regent heal to Preside Over Annual
Contest Tomorrow Night in
University Hall
Junius E. Beal of Ann Arbor, a mem-
ber of the board of regents, will pre-
side at the annual peace contest to be
held in University hall at 8 o'clock to-
morrow night.
Five contestants wil speak on some
phase of international peace, and for
the first time in the history of the Uni-
versity a woman will appear as one of
the contestants.
The cpmplete program, and the or-
der in which the speakers will appear
follows:
J. R. Simpson. '18, "Sentinels of
Peace."
Colonel Brown, '19, "Christianity
and Militarism."
James Schermerhorn, Jr., '18, "The
Course of Empire."
Lois May, '18, "The Abandoned
Palace."
1. B. Teegarden, '17, "The Hope of
Nations."

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GERMANY PROPOSES PEACE PLANS
TO. BRITAIN AND ALLIES THROUGH
__NOTES GIVEN NEUTRAL DIPLOMAT

I

H

BE A GOODFELLOW!

* * * * * * * * * *m* * 4'

ere's the list of contributors:

riffins

.$1.. 015 *

Vulcans ..............
Sphinx ...............
Scalp and Blade.......
Cercle Francais........
Adelphil .................
State Street Merchant....

* ADDITIONAL LETTER SENT
VATICAN URGING
T* SUPPORT

10.10 *
5.00 *
5.00 *
5.00 *
5.00 *
1.00 *

*

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*I

I
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During the early years of his rela-
tign with the Law school, he taught
Blackstone, but recently gave his en-
tire time to lecturing on contract law.
Under his direction this department
has been greatly expanded.
Dean Bates Lauds Professor.
Dean 'Henry M. Bates of the Law
school commended thescharacter and
personality of Professor Knowlton
highly lst night when informed of
thegdeath of his fellow instructor.
"Among the students, Professor
Knowlton had a remarkable power of
making friends," Dean Bates said. "He
was called 'Jerry' by students and
faculty alike. His clear statement and
foresight gave him recognition among
the leading lawyers of the country."
Life of Prof. Knowlton.
Prof. Knowlton was born at Canton,
Wayne county, Michigan, Dec. 14.
1850, son of Earnest John atid Roxana
(Potter) Knowlton. He was of New
England ancestry.
Having received his preparatory
training in the district schools of the
state, at the Michigan State Normal
school, and at the Ann Arbor high
school, Professor Knowlton entered
the University, from which he was
graduated in 1875 with the degree of
Bachelor of Arts. Three years later
he obtained his degree of Bachelor of
Laws.
Postmaster of Ann Arbor.
For 12 years he was a member of
the law firm of Sawyer and Knowlton.
but severed his connection definitely
in the year 1890, in order to devote his
entire time to teaching. From 1882 to
1885 he served as postmaster for Ann
Arbor.
In 1885 he was made assistant pro-
fessor of law, and from 1889 he filled
the marshall professorship of law at
the University. From 1891 till 1896.
Professor Knowlton acted in the ca-
pacity of dean of his department.
Authority on Contract.
For the last quarter of-a century he
has been recognized as one of the
greatest authorities on the law of con-
tracts in the United States. He has
written many volumes on legal sub-
jects, which are used at present as
standard text books and as authorities
at the bar. He has contributed to a
number of legal periodicals, published
an edition of "Anson on Contracts,"
and a text book of criminal cases for
the use of law students.
He is survived by his wife, Mrs.
Adele Pattengill Knowlton, to whom
he was married in 1875; by his two
daughters, Mrs. Herman Kleene of
Peoria, Ill., and Mrs. Joseph A. Burs-
ley, wife of Prof. Bursley of the en-
gineering college; by his sister, Mrs.
V. H. Lane, wife of Judge Lane, and
by three grandchildren.
The funeraldarrangements will be
made today.
Dean Bates early this morning
stated that law classes would be held
today as usual.
Ailois Men Will Meet Tonight
AllU linoats men will meet at the
Ulnion at 7:80 o'clock tonight to elect

DECEMBER NUMBEROF
INAEROUT TODAY
Literary Magazine Contains Many Ar-
tieles of Interest in
Latest Issue
Copies of the December number of
the Inlander, Michigan's literary mag-
azine, will appear upon the campus
today. The publication is said to be
especially bright and sparkling, and
its material the efforts of some of the
nest talent of the campus.
"Big Game Hunters Who Do Not

FIRST OPERA TRYOUTS

TOBEHELD TONIGHT
Extensive Trip Likely to Produce
Competition Among Votaries
of Thespian Rites
The first steps toward the making of
the 1917 Michigan Union opera will
be made at the cast tryouts to be held
in the Alpha Nu rooms, University
hall, at 7 o'clock tonight. It is ex-
pected that a large number of men will
attend the tryout since the production,
this year calls for an unusual number
-f different characters.
In view also of the extensive trip to
be made by the opera troupe this year,
there is little doubt but that competi-
ion will be stronger among the try-
'>uts. Negotiations are now in order
to give several shows in the east, be-
sides the regular engagements of Chi-
cago and Detroit.

a I

Different Classes on Campus to
Assemblies to Adopt Rep-
resenrtatives

Hold

Shoot," is the title of an article by
Prof. E. C. Case of the department of
geology and paleontology.
Two articles have been contributed
by T. F. McAllister, '18,. and R. M.
Carson, '17, the first censuring the
Michigan Union opera, while the lat-
ter has taken for his theme the student
council and campus government.

Five J-hop committeemen were
lected by the junior lit class at their
neeting yesterday afternoon. The men
lected are: Frank Grover, Robert H.
T-alstead, Guy A. Reem, Victor Sim-
mnons, and Harry McCallum. The vote
;howed a tie between Carl Neumann
and McCallum for the fifth committee-
man, and a coin/ was flipped to decide
vho should get the position, with the
,esult that McCallum was chosen.
The junior engineers will elect their
.ommitteemen tomorrow at their as-
sembly. The engineers will elect three
committeemen and the general chair-
nan of the hop, while the junior laws
will elect two committeemen, the dents
>ne, the homeops one, the architects
mne, the pharmics one, and the medics
>ne. All junior classes will elect their
ommitteemen by tomorrow night, and
'he complete committee will meet over
he week-end to formulate plans for
'he social affair.
ISSIP GABRILOWITSCH, NOTED
MTSICIAN, PLEASES AUDIENCE

TO SPEAK ON NAVAL HISTORY I HOUSEWIVES' LEAGUE TO MEET

Western Secrctiry of Naval League
Will Give Talk Tonight
William Mather Lewis, western sec-
retary of the Navy league, who was
falsely reported to have spoken last
night in the Natural Science building
on the history of the United States
navy, will deliver his illustrated lec-
ture at 8:15 o'clock this evening in the
Science auditorium.
Mr. Lewis has travelled extensively
abroad, and has made a close study of
governmental conditions in most of
the larger European countries. Be-
cause of his application to his foreign
studies,. Mr. Lewis declined the pos-
ition of ambassadorial secretary which
was offered him in 1913 by President
Wilson as a recognition of merit.
OVER-SEA IMPERIALISM CAUSE
OF PRESENT WAR CLAIMS HOWE
"Over-sea imperialism was one of
the basic causes for the present great
war," declared Frederick C. Howe,
chief of the United States bureau of
immigration, in his address last night
in University hall.
In Mr. Howe's opinion universal
peace will never be secured until an
universial democracy is established by
all of the important countries of the
world, or at least a close approach to
this form of government.
)i ilitary Corps to Drill Tonight
Michigan's military training corps
will hold a meeting at 7 o'clock this
evening in Waterman gymnasium. At
8:15 o'clock, the body will attend the
Lewis lecture, which' is one of those
prescribed by the military training
course.

To Discuss Plans for Joining Egg
Boycott Movement
The members of the Housewives'
league of the city will -meef' at 2:30
o'clock this afternoon in the council
chamber* of the city hall to discuss
plans to combat the high cost of liv-
ing in Ann Arbor. .One of the prin-
cipal things to come up before the
meeting is the question of whether or
not they will join the egg boycott
movement.
A campaign among the fraternities,
sororities, and house clubs was started
yesterday on the campus to ascertain
their opinion on the egg boycott ques-
tion and many of the organizations
seemed ready to co-operate with the
movement. Margaret Reynolds, '17,
president of the Women's league, will
appoint a woman student today to rep-
resent the league at the meeting of
the Housewives' league this afternoon.
NO NEW CASES OF SMALLPOX
HAVE BEEN REPORTED
There has not been a single addi-
tional case of smallpox reported since
Saturday afternoon, when Rhea Sey-
bold was confine to the University
hospital.
"I am confident that the disease is
under control," said Health Officer
Wessinger last night. "Owing to the
fact that it takes two weeks for small-
pox to develop the seriousness of an
epidemic can not be ascertained."
Lajpat Raj, of India, to Lecture Here
From India comes Laipat Rai, trav-
eller and adjudicator, who will lec-
ture in room C of the Law building
at 4 o'clock tomorrow afternoon on
"Laws in India."

WORKERS WALK OUT
AT HOOTR FCTORY
One Hundred Men, Employed on Night
Force, Strike for Higher
Wages
Approximately 100 men on the night
force at the Hoover Steel Ball factory
went on a strike for higher wages last
night. Their action followed a vote
by the employees as to whether the
factory's forces should go back to
work or walk out.
The vote was held at 6 o'clock last
night, as the day force of the factory'
was leaving and the night force going
on. Mr. L. J. Hoover, manager of the
factory, proposed the vote after agita-
tion on the part of the workers for
higher wages.
Although the vote stood 375 to 276
against striking, the night men de-
clared'that the employees had not had
sufficient time to consider the matter,
and although many of them went back
to work, about 100 men gathered at
Weinberg's coliseum and declared
their intention of striking.
By this time the day men had gone
home and the 100 night strikers agreed
to meet at 6 o'clock tomorrow morn-
ing and prevent the day force from go-
ing to work, so that the whole factory
will be tied up. The night men who
walked out claim that the day force is
in sympathy with the strike movement.
Immediately after the vote was taken
the machinery of the factory wa
started and many of the night force
began work. The strikers then gath-
ered and began to climb in the win-
dows of the factory in order to stop
the machines and keep the men from
working. Meanwhile Hoover had
called for the police, who arrived at
the plant just in time to stop this. The
police, after some trouble, dispersed
the crowd, whereupon the men went
to Weinberg's and decided not to go
back to work, and to induce the day
forces not to return to the factory.
The employees claim that when
work started for the nw addition to
the factory the men's work was in-
creased 25 per cent, but that their
wages were not raised. "Three men
have to do four men's work," said one
of the strikers, "and we don't get
any ,more pay for it than when the
factory wasn't built."
Mustering-in of Naval Men Today
Fbrmal mustering-in of the Univer-
sity naval reserve divisions will take
place this afternoon from 1 to 5:3C
o'clock in the trophy room of Water-
man gymnasium. All men who have
been drilling with the corps are or-
dered to report sometime during the
afternoon to be sworn in and enrolled
in the divisions.
Mimes Take in"New Members Tuesday
Mr. Lyman Bryson of the rhetoric
faculty, and Gordon Smith, '17E, were
admitted to membership in the Mimes
of the Michigan Union at a luncheon
given by that organization yesterday
noon. Plans were formed for a dance
next Saturday.

HOLLWEG MAKESDECLARATION
End of War at Present Would Call for
Division of Territory Similar
to That Before Struggle
Germany and her allies suggested
peace today in notes dispatched
through the neutral diplomats in Ber-
lin to the entente powers.
The United Press learned in Wash-
ington on the highest authority that
the proposals are based on the restora-
tion of the territorial status, as it ex-
isted before the war, except the creat-
ing of independent kingdoms in Po-
land and Lithuania. The question of
adjustment of boundary lines in the
Balkans is left open, and probably will
entail the most serious complications.
In addition to notifying neutral
powers of Germany's readiness to dis-
cuss peace, a separate note was dis-
patched to Pope Benedict declaring
Germany was ready to set before the
world the question of whether' it was
possible to find a basis of understand-
ing. No statement was forthcomin'g
from the foreign office in London. It
was declared no comment would be
made until Germany's terms are of-
ficially known and all of the entente
powers, had been consulted. Neither
the Washington state department nor
the White House would comment on
the proposals.
Beth uann-Hollweg's Proposal
Berlin, Dec. 12.-Chancellor Holl-
wg 's proposals for peace negotiations
as outlined in the reichstag have as
their object, he said, a guarantee of
existence in honor and liberty for the
central powers appropriate to the es-
tablishment of lasting peace.
"Unconfused we have progressed. It
is our firm decision thus to continue
to progress, always ready to defend
ourselves to the end for the nation's
existence," he said, "and for its free
and safe future. We are, however, al-
ways ready to stretch out the hand
of peace. .
Calls War "Catastrophe"
"The emperor now considers the
moment has come to take an official
action toward peace," the chancellor
continued, "and therefore, in complete
harmony, Germany's allies decided to
propose to the hostile governments an
entrance into peace negotiations. This
morning he transmitted a note to this
effect through representatives of the
powers watching Germany's interests
end rights in hostile states."
The chancellor quoted the text of the
note which described the war as "a
catastrophe which thousands of years
of civilization have been unable to
prevent, and which injured the most
precious achievements of humanity.
"The spirit and material progress
which were the pride of Europe ,at the
beginning of the twentieth century are
threatened with ruin," the text con-

Pianist's Presentation of Own
position Wins Applause
Last Night

Com-1

That Ossip Gabrilowitsch, who ap-
,eared in Hill auditorium last evening,
s a pianist and artist of the -first rank
was clearly demonstrated to every one
who heard him. He presented a pro-
gram which was well balanced, inter-
esting, and varied.
-The Chopin group and the "Rondo
Espressivo," by Philip Emanial Bach,
together with the Schumann "Sonata
?n G Minor" were received with much
Oavor. The pianist's own composition,
"Caprice-Burlesque, Op. 3," was un-
usually interesting.
Gabrilowitsch's playing called forth
much applause, in response to which
he played four encores, one of them
being Schubert's "Moments, Musical."

tinues..
"Austria, Turkey and Bulgaria ga
nroof of unconquerable strength
this struggle, and gained gigantic a
vantages over adversaries superior
number and materials. Our lines a
as unshaken as ever against the i
peated attempts of the armies of o
enemies.
Tone of Statement Confident
"The last attack in the Balkans w
"apidly and victoriously overcon
The most recent events have demo
Atrated that the future of the war 1w
not succeed in breaking the power
,ur forces. If our enemies decline
make peace, wishing to take up
themselves the world's heavy burd
and all the terrors which will her
after follow even in the least a
Smallest homes, every German hea
will burn with sacred wrath again
fhese enemies who are unwilling
;top human slaughter, in order th
their plans of conquest and annihil
tihn may continue.
"In .this fateful hour we take a fat
ful decision. God will be the judg
We proceed on our way without fe
and maashamed, ready for fight ai
ready for peace. Our four allies ha
been obliged to take up arms to d

/',

BE SURE TO GET THE
INLANDER
"TO-DAY'S THE DAY"

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