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November 25, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-25

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0

THE WEATHER
FOR ANN ARBOR-
PROBABLY FAIR; CONTINUED
COLD WITH VARIABLE WINDS.

,tom{ " Or.
}
GY r
AN

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UNITED PRESS WIRE
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
THE ONLY MORNING PAPER LN
ANN ARBOR

VOL. XXVII. No. 47. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1916. PRICE FIVE CENTS

WLLIAMS TALK
BEFORE MEETING
of CONFERENCE
SAYS WOMEN RECEIVE AS HIGH
SALARIES AS MEN IN
JOURNALISM
MRS, MARTIN ALSO SPEAKS
Jiliss Gertrude Gogin Addresses Audi-
ence in Newberry Hall; Gath-
ering Ends Today
"Studies of technical value should
be taken to prepare for future voca-
tional work," said Dean Talcott Wil-
liams of the Pulitzer school of jour-
nalism, who opened the second meet-
ing of the vocational conference yes-
terday afternoon with an address on
"Journalism for Women" "As a basis
for journalism women should master
economics, political science, and the
history of the last 100 years. A
knowledge of the foundation of society,
ability to write directly and simply,
and a sense of consecration are neces-
sary to the successful journalist." Dean
Williams mentioned the fact that wom-
en in journalism receive just as high
salaries as men in the same positions,
but they are not yet given executive
positions.
Mrs. Martin Addresses Meeting.
"Vodational Training" was the sub-
ject of the address given by Mrs. Ger-
trude Martin, executive secretary of
the Association of Collegiate Alumnae.
"The first requisite for the vocational
life of women is to abolish the unpro-
fessional spirit," said Mrs. Martin.
"Too many are doing volunteer work
merely to fill the gap between gradu-
ation and marriage. The vocational
outlook for women is enormously
broadened by the war, for they are
proving that they can do well things
that no one expected they could." Mrs.
Martin urged that a bureau be estab-
lished .here which- would follow the
work of graduates and give informa-
tion in any field which a girl may
want to enter.
Miss Gogin Last Speaker.
The last speaker of the afternoon
was Miss Gertrude Gogin, national sec-
retary of the Y. W. C. A.; whose sub-
ject was "Industrial Secretarial Work."
The purpose of the industrial depart-
ment of that organization is to give
the women of the workshops a chance
for self-development, and to awaken
social consciousness.
"What the girls want is a chance to
make something of themselves," said
Miss Gogin. "They are organized into
three classes, the play, the educational.
and the gymnasium groups. The girls
actually have to be taught how to play,
as they work ten hours a day, six days
In the week. It is hoped through this
work to bring about better relation-
ships and understanding between the
volunteer workers and the factory
girls."
Talks on Training for Work.
In the evening at Newberry hall
Miss Gogin discussed the question of
training for this work. Secretaryships
are divided into two classes, that of
industrial extension secretary, and that
of girls' work secretary. The former
has charge of organizing girls from
factories, laundries, restaurants, de-
partment stores, and offices; the latter
has charge of girls in the grade
schools and high schools. Three
months preparation, supplemented by
practical work, is required before tak-

ing up a regular paid position, but for
experienced workers the salaries aver-
age well with those of teaching, and
the demand for college women to fill
such positions in the larger cities is
greater than the supply
One More Session to Be Held.
Only one more session of the con-
ference will be held preceding the clos-
ing luncheon at noon today. Begin-
(Continued on Page Six.)

Deutscher Verein
Holds Initiation
GermanS oeiety Takes in Thirty New
Members at November 17
Meeting
Deutscher Verein at its meeting
Nov. 17, elected the following 30 mem-
bers: Helen Clark, '17, Doris Mason,
'17, Vera Haven, '17, Meta Henne, '19,
Alice Heuzel, '19, Mildred Reindel, '19,
Mieta Prange, '18, Vera Schuhknecht,
'18, Hilda Stroebel, '18, Margaret
Schmutz, '19, Irma Anschutz, '19, Lela
Deshinger, '19, Margaret Douglas, '18,
Lena Sackett, '18, Francis Broene, '18,
Wilhelm Granse, '19, Harcombe Caver-
ly, '19, Lawrence Goldsmith, '19, Julius
Haab, '19, Arthur Ippel, '18, Charles
Kang, '17, Sigmund Frank, '18, Her-
bert Bierwagen, '19, Paul Smith, '19,
Claude Schutter, '17, Harold Spiller,
'19, Woldemar Schrieber, '19, Roby
Burley, '19, Karl Ritscher, lit. special,
and Ralph Gault, '19.
Last Thursday evening the senior
girls of the upper section of the so-
ciety entertained the girls of the lower
section at a stunt party given in the
Deutscher Verein rooms. The program
was prepared by Olga E. Shinkham,,
'17, who introduced a number of In-
teresting and amusing German games.
Cremate Jody of
Novelist London
Only Few Near Relatives and Author's
Secretary Present at
Funeral
San Francisco, Nov. 24.-There was
grief today in the "Valley of the Moon"
for Jack London, who immortalized1
the valley, was going on his last longI
journey. At noon today in the Oak-
land cremawrr the body -of the nov-t
elist and adventurer was given to the
furnace in the presence of a few mem-7
hers of his immediate family.
Obeying his long expressed wish,
his relatives cremated the corpse with-'
out religious cermony of ritual of any
kind and without a suggestion of os-
tentation. The little funeral cortege
early today boared a train at Glen
Allen, where the late author's home is.
A few residents of the district where
London lived for years stood at a re-
apectful distance from the station and'
'with bared heads paid tribute to Lon-
don's body as it was put aboard the
train. Otherwise the funeral was pri-
vate.
The party included only the widow,
Mrs. Charpion Lndn, Mrs. Elisa
Shepard, London's sister, and J.
Bryne, his secreta . When the party
Oakland they were met by London's
two daughters, Joan and Bess, and by
the writer's former wife, from who
he divorced ten years ago. From Oak
land the body was taken to the cre.,
matory.
Hiram . 5taxim
Dies in London
Great Inventor Passes Away at Age
of 76; Started Life as a
Poor Boy
London, Nov. 24.-Sir Hiram Stevens
Maxim, the great inventor of firearms
and explosives, died here today. The
scientist, who was 76 years old at the
time of his death, had been reported
ill for the last several days from his
home here.
,Maxim was born in Sangervile, Me.,
in 1840, of poor parents, and received

merely a common school education.
After this he worked as an apprentice
in coach building, until the scientific
lust mastered him, and he began to at-
tend lectures between work hours at
an ironmaster's. His first patents fol-
lowed, electrical devices, which were
improvements on incandescent lamps,
and self-registering current machines.
Some years tafr there followed the
(Continued on Page Six.)

MILITARYTRAINING
PRACTICLLY SURE'
Modified War Order Makes Possble
Performing of Practical Work
in Summer Camps
OFFICER TO BEGIN COURSES
With the acceptance of the modified
war order number 48 by the regents
of the University, military training is
practically assured at Michigan. The
communication was dispatched from
the war department during the last
week by General Scott, chief of staff,
providing for the required modification
in the military measure, to enable col-
lege students to enter the courses in
training.
Heretofore the measure was viewed
in a rather unfavorable light by the
authorities, because of the fact that
much of the trivial practical work
which is demanded in the regular
course in military instruction was con-
sidered too severe a drain upon the
time and application to studies in the
curriculum.
This was due to the fact that much
of the course consisted in such routine
as greasing gun carriages, treating the
leather harnesses, repairing certain
works, and tasks of similar nature.
Many of the eastern colleges entered
into the plan without inquiry as to the
exact nature of the affair, with the re-
sult that there has been much dis-
satisfaction manifest since the advent
of the practical work. The new or-
der obviates all the untoward condi-
tions in this regard, by allowing this
part of the training to be pursued dur-
ing the summer at one of the regular
training camps.
In the course to be inaugurated at
the University, theory and niltary .i-
tory will be the most prominent
branches of the department. These
studies will consist in the teaching of
tactics and strategy for the most part,
leaving the other work to be pursued
at the troop encampment. An officer
will be detailed in a short time from
the war department to begin the
courses, and it is expected that a con-
siderable number will be enrolled. The
president of the University, the in-
structor in military training, and the
war department will all co-operate in
all matters of policy affecting the plan
of study, and their joint decision will
determine the character of the course.
CHEMICAL SOCIETY INITIATES
Phi Lambda Upsilon Takes Nine Men
Into Its Ranks
Phi Lambda Upsilon, honorary
chemical society, held its fall initia-
tion last night in the chemistry build-
ing. The following men were taken in
to the society at this time: A. D.
Webb, grad., A. A. Scholl, '17, W. S.
Reveno, '17P, J. H. Richtig, grad., J.
A. Blecki, '17E, R. G. Brown, '17P, E.
R. Waite, grad., E. E. Schumaker, '18,
and Mr. Claire Upthegrove, of the
chemical engineering faculty.
The initiation banquet will be held
during the first part of December.
Berlin Reports Gains Over Danube
Berlin, Nov. 24.-"We reached the
Alt river. Mackensen's forces crossed
the Danube in several places," read
the second war office statement this
afternoon. "In the Somme district
there is no essential news."

Let 's Go to the Smoker
Faculty, students, and alumni will have an opportunity tonight
to show for the last time their appreciation for the football team of
1916. The occasion is the fourth annual football smoker, held under
the auspices of the Michigan Union. In one sense it is a wind-up
smoker, for it marks the final closing of the football season. The
"M's" are awarded to members of the squad, while words of apprecia-
tion are expressed to them by representatives of the faculty, the ath-
letic board, and students.,
But more than a wind-up, the smoker is an event that bridges the
gap between the present season just completed and the season next to
come. Of the football men who will attend the smoker tonight a
majority will return to build the Michigan team of 1917. These men
should receive the thanks which is their due for their past accomplish-
ments. More than that, they should receive inspiration for future
efforts from the enthusiasm of an appreciative student body. It is
the duty of every Michigan man to go to the coliseum tonight, to
show his appreciation for the past, and give inspiration for a better
year to come.

GOVERNMENT IS THROUGH
WITH SUB NEGOTIATIONS

EMPEROR CHARLES GIVES
STATEMENT TO FORGES

State Department Says
Aware of United
Attitude

Germany Is
States

In Proclamation to Army
New Austrian Ruler

and Navy
Lauds

By Carl D. Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, Nov. 24.-The state de-
partment is done with extensive ne-
gotiations or representations in pres-
ent or future submarine questions. Dis-
-ussion this afternoon of past and re-
cent submarine events brought from
high state department officials the ex-
planation that Germany is fully aware
of the American attitude toward sub-
marine warfare and operations, and
that if there should happen to viola-
tions of the principles the United
States has striven to uphold, further
diplcmatic correspondence is unneces-
sary.
In the same breath, however, the de-
partment minimizes reports tending to
show that a submarine crisis is at
hand. Secretary of State Lansing this
afternoon was questioned concerning a
quotation "that these rumors appear
to originate in America." "The situa-
tion is no more serious now than it
was three or four weeks ago," the de-
partment replied officially. "I don't
know why stories of submarine crises
are put out at this time. You can
draw your own conclusions."
The German embassy this afternoon
took exception to "the tone of the
American press toward the submarine
problem." It was said the embassy
has Wirelessed the Berlin foreign of-
fice of this tone. Emassy officials said
they were at a loss to comprehend re-
ports tending to show a crisis. In a
word, the administration has positively
determined to eliminate note writing
to Germany, but has not yet reached
the conclusion that a break in rela-
tions is imminent, it was stated.
Students Must Use Athletic Books
The junior lits will battle for the
campus championship this afternoon
at 2 o'clock on Ferry field. The Ann
Arbor high school will play the Waite
high of Toledo at the same time that
the J-lit contest is going on. Admis-
sion will be charged by the high school
so that all students desiring to see the
interclass game must bring their ath-
letic books to gain entrance.

Late Franz Josef
Amsterdam, Nov. 24.-From Berlin
today was received the following text
of a proclamation issued by the new
ruler of Austria-Hungary, Emperor
Charles, to his soldiers and sailors:
"Soldiers, your supreme war lord,
my illustrious grand uncle, Emperor
and King Franz Josef, has been gath-
ered to his ancestors. His late majesty
was a shining example of soldierly de-
votion to duty. He devoted himself
wholly to the weal of the fatherland.
So long as his strength lasted his
thoughts were with his beloved and
gallant warriors.
"Up to the present I have endured
with you the hard but glorious days of
the gigantic struggle. In this great
epoch I, as supreme war lord, place
myself at the head of my trusty army
and navy with a belief in our sacred
right and the victory which, with God's
help and that of our allies, we will
gain for our righteous cause.
"May the spirit of the illustrious
deceased inspire you to further heroic
battles in order that we may lay the
wreath of victory on his bier in token
fo our loyalty and gratitude for his
love and solicitude, for the royal army
and navy which never ceased to ani-
mate his noble heart."
Amsterdam, Nov. 24.-Heart-rending
scenes attended the deportation of Bel-
gian male civilians from Tirlemont,
according to the correspondent of the
Telegraaf. All men from 17 to 55 were
deported, being taken to Germany in
freight cars. The Belgian minister of
justice declared today that the Ger-
mans are deporting many small agri-
cultural land owners from Hainhault,
and have also sent from Ghent work-
men who are the heads of large fam-
ilies, and about 200 women textile
workers.
Athens, Nov. 24.-Crown Prince
Alexander of Serbia accompanied Gen-
eral Serrail Wednesday in his vic-
torious entry to Monastir, according to
advices here today. The populace of
the Serbian city received the prince
with wildest joy.
London, Nov. 24.-The Serbian offi-
cial statement this afternoon asserted
further advances had been made north
of Monastir, despite continued violent
resistence. Serbian troops have taken
the village of Rapes.
Salonika, Nov. 24.-The British offi-
cial statement today announced the
pushing back of enemy patrols and a
loss around Doiran in the Struma sec-
tor.
Rome, Nov. 24.-Wireless dispatches
received here assert that there is great
suffering from lack of food among theE
people of Dobrudja.

ENTIRE S S ITDENT
IFOOTBALLSMOKER
CROWD WILL FOLLOW BAND DOWN
STATE STREET TO WEIN.
BERG'S COLISEUM
SCHERMERHORN IS SPEAKER
Smokes, Cider, and Doughnuts Provid
ed to Make Evening Merry; Ben-
nett Will Lead Cheers
The annual football smoker, which
is to be held tonight in Weinberg's
coliseum, will be one of the largest in
the history of Michigan. Over 2,000.
students, headed by the Varsity band,
will march down State street at 7:15
o'clock to pay the last tribte to the
1916 football team.
The smoker committee has made
elaborate preparations to entertain the
crowd. Over 600 gallons of cider,
2,200 corncob pipes, 2,200 cans of Vel-
vet smoking tobacco, 3,000 doughnuts,
60,000 cigarets, and 2,200 tin cups with
the picture of the "Good Old Varsity
Fighters" on them are only a few of
the donations to be handed out to the
students.
Action pictures of every member of
the 1916 squad will be flashed on the
screen, while the band is playing
Michigan songs. "Bob" Bennett, '18,
the Varsity cheer leader, and his as-
sistants, will also be present to lead
the students when the action pic-
tures are shown.
James Schermerhorn, editor of the
Detroit Times, will be the principal
speaker of the evening. Mr. Schermer-
horn is one of the best speakers in the
west and will be remembered by all
who attended the smoker two years
ago.
Prof. R. W. Aigler, Prof. William
Henderson, Prof. H. -R. Cross, Staats
Abrams, '17, and Harry L. Gault, '17L,
master of cermonies, will be the other
speakers on the program.
The men who will receive their
"M's" tonight as a reward for their
work on Michigan's 1916 football team
will be: Captain Maulbetsch, Dunne,
Smith, Weske, Niemann, Rehor, Zeiger,
Martens, Gracey, Raymond, Boyd,
Sparks, Peach and Wieman.
This is the last time that Maul-
betsch, one of the greatest halfback's
Michigan has ever had, Rehor, Dunne,
Niemann, and Zeiger will be seen be-
fore the student body. It is expected
that the whole male student body will
be present to give the team a last
farewell.
START COAL SHORTAGE RELIEF
Committee Orders Return of All Empty
Cars to Owners
Washington, Nov. 24.-The newly or-
ganized conference committee on car
efficiency of the American Railway as-
sociation began its campaign to re-
lieve the coal shortage yesterday by
instructing all railways to return coal
cars, loaded or empty, to their owners
immediately,
Members of the committee said this
action probably would result in dis-
patch of enough cars to interior coal
fields from congested seaport sections
within two weeks to have a marked.
effect on the threatened coal famine
in various sections. Similar action may

be taken later in regard to other
classes of cars, but the most pressing
demand just now is for coal carriers.
.Railroads were requested by the
committee to call the committee's In-
structions at once to the attention of
officials and employes directing car
movements and to forward to the com-
mittee here copies of orders issued in
compliance. These reports will be sub-
mitted to the interstate commerce com-
mission.

FOOTBALL SMOKER
WEINBERG COLISEUM
25c TICKETS AT UNION 25e
SAT. NOV. 25 SAT.

a

FIR E
to Union Life, Yearly and
Pledged Life Members
Tickets at Union

MICHIGAN
SPOTLIGHT

UNION
VAUDEVILLE

It

25c

GRAND

ALL

S T A I

And a Few Meteorites
Celebrating the 200th Anniversary of the Invention of Minstrel Shows
Hill Auditorium, Tuesday, Nov. 28, 8 P. M.

to al others, including
ladies. Tickets are on sale
now. Ask that 0ir-1now.
25c

II

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