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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 24, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

riz ''11

ra a

1.

ORDERS

FOR

Thanksgiving, November 3o
should be placed now to
insure prompt delivery.

G. H.
ding Merchant T

Wild Company
'ilors State Street

You will always get a
PERFECT. SHAVE
if you use one of our guaranteed
Old Style Razors
H. L SWITZER Co.
State St. Hardware

NT11 .I" N D AIL
Official newspaper at the University of
Mfr:.igan. Published every morning except
Mjnday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier, $2.so; by mail, $3.00.
Want ad. stations: Quarry's; Students' Sup-
ply Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 24x4.
Communications not to exceed Soo words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker..........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church..............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn.............City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald...... .Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson. Telegraph Editor
Verne Ei. Burnett........... Associate Editor
Golda Ginsburg.........Women's Editor
Carleton W. Reade......... Statistical Editor
J. E. Campbell...Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip Emery.. Assistant Business Manager
Albert E. Horne..Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau. .. Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter....Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
L. S. Thompson E. A. Baumgarth
L. W. Nieter J. L. Stadeker
Reporters,
B. A. Swaney C. W. Neumann
W. R. Atlas C. C. Andrews
E. L. Zeigler H. C. Garrison
Alien Sohoenfield C. M. Jickling
Marian Wilson D. Rood
Business Staff
Bernard Wohl J. E. Robinson
Paul E. Cholette Harry 1. Louis
Harold Makinson Harold Lance
Earl F. Ganschow Walter R. Payne
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1916.
Night Editor-H. C. Garrison.

ANNOUNCE PERSONNEL
Of J-LI COMMITTEES

..

Just Received
. shipmeuit of
LAVNDRY CASES
t Slater Book Shop " :-
new shoes are stitched with Goodyear Welt machines.
use same machines for repair work. We believe we
e the most modern equipped shoe repair shop in Ann
or. You'll get high class work and courteous treatment
his shop and we think!you'll find us worthy of patron-
Our call and deliver service is at your disposal. Use it,
Famous Shoe Repairing Co.

JONE 807
)ETROIT UNITED LINES
en Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
un on Eastern time, one hour faster
at time.
t Limited and Express Cars-8:io a.
hourly to 7:ro p. m., 9:10 p. m.
azoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. L. and
ao hours to 6:48 p. i.; to Lansing,
M.
n Express Cars-(Local stops west of
bor)-9 :48 a. m. and every two hours
p. mn.
Cars Eastbound-5:35 a. m, 6:40 a.
a. m. and every two hours to 7:05 p.
P. i., 9:05 p. m., os10:50 p. m. to
ti only, 9:20o a. mn., 9:5o 'a. in., 2:05 p.
5P. mn., 11 :45 p. in., x :io a. in., i :20
o Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Cars Westbound-6:o5 a. M., 7:50 a.
:ar ers & Mechanics Bank
Ters the Best in Modern Banking
ECURITY - - - EFFICIENCY
ent and Pleasapt 1 Qarters. You Will
ed with Our Seg~ice. Two Offices
8. Main St. : : 330 S. State St.
IRITERS of all makeS
e or Rent. Cleaning &
airing~ TYPEWRITING &
EOGRAPHING. SUPPLIES
0.e De Mo yrrI 1

301 S.

State St.

We Offer You
SECURITY - - SERVICE - - LOCATION
Resources $3,8oo,ooo
Ann Arbor, Savings Dank
Incorporated 1869
Main Office--
Northwest Corner Main and Huron
Branch Office-
707 North University Ave.
MODERN BARBER SHOP
332 State St.

A Particular Place
for Particular People.

FRANK C. BOLIGH, Prop,

S. State

582-4x

F---.

ANNOUNCEMENT

SAM BURCHFIELD

& CO.

Gives you the best Tailoring service
to be obtained anywhere in the coun-
try, coupled with a wonderful line
of Woolens.

ROUGH-HOUSE IN COLLEGE
In Spain there was once a rogue
who led his blind master to the foot
of a great wall. "You are now at
the verge of a wide brook, master,"
said the rogue, "and if you jump hard
you will clear it." The master, who
was a burly man, gathered all his.
strength ani leaped against the stone
barrier, and fell back senseless.
Whereat the rogue stole his master's
gold and fled, to the great amuse-
ment of the people who heard the
tale.
People may still smile at a tale of
medieval joking such as this, but they
usually do so with some sense of
horror, or at least of its unreality. The
public of today turns down its thumbs
at the proposal of practical joking or
rough-house, which lessens the ele-
ment of safety. The American public
is thought particularly to apply this
more enlightened view of things to
initiations and general horseplay in
college life. With the co-operation of
students themselves, in their hazing of
freshmen and their fraternity and so-
ciety initiations, the natural tendency
of safety first would be greatly assist-
ed.
Old pictures show Heidelberg fresh-
men with their noses pressed against
real grindstones which the upper-
classmen turned. It is said that deaths
frequently occured in medieval initia-
tions. But the danger is not yet ob-
literated. The story of a woman stu-
dent who leaped to death from the
dormitory window to elude hazers is
still fresh in newspaperdom. There
are also stories such as this: In a
western university, a party of initia-
tors took their blindfolded victim to
the edge of a precipice in the Rockies.
When allowed to see he suddenly be-
held the sky blazing with stars, and
the vast stretch of the valley, and fell
back dead from the shock. Such in-
cidents are not typical but they are
possibilities which more frequently
result in broken bones or nervous
prostrations. When they do occur,
such incidents are blots upon college
life.
Initiations and a certain amount of
rough-house, perhaps, are natural
events in college life. Ifdhandled with-
out restraint, they are dangerous fac-
tors. If conducted carefully, they may
be agents for good, and, if so, have a
natural place among the events that
go to make up the life of a univer-
sity.
PROF. E. C. BALDWIN ADDRESSES
MENORAH SOCIETY ON SUNDAY
Prof. Edward Chauncey Baldwin, of
the English literature department of
the University of Illinois, will address
the Michigan Menorah society at its
next meeting on Sunday evening, Nov.
26, at 7:30 o'clock in Newberry hall,
on "A Time That Tries Men's Souls."
This marks the second appearance

Frank Grover, Thomas McAllister, and
Karl Wehmeyer, Chairmen.
Hold Smoker Soon
President Owen J. Watts of thec
junior literary class has announced
the following committee appointments
for the ensuing year:
Social committee --Frank Grover,
chairman; De T. Mosier, James
Schermerhorn. Jr., J. C. Lane Barron,e
Dorothy Allen, Louise Irish, and Mil-
dred Hill.
Good fellowship committee: Thomas
MYIcAllister, chairman; Carl Neumann,
Leland Thompson, Victor Simmons,
Harold Charles Le Baron Jackson,
Philip Pack, Coan Adams, Donald Wil-
son, David Pence, and John Sanford
Wilson.
Finance committee-Karl Wehmeyer,
chairman; Donald Bathrick, and Wil-
liam Darnell.
All committees have begun work in
earnest, and before long a definite pro-
gram of activity and entertainment will
be announced in class meeting. A
smoker will be held at the nion dur-
ing the first week in December. and
the social committee has several other
plans under consideration.
Within a short time, Secretary
George Daniels will appoint a date for
the collection of dues. All members
of the class are urged to pay atten-
tion to the announcement, as the class
is very much behind in its accounts,
due to lax methods of collecting dues
in the past.
MICHIGAN LAW REVIEW MAILED
AFTER DELAY OF THREE WEEKS
Rush of Work in Publishing House
Holds Up Printing of
Legal Monthly
The Michigan Law Review for No-
vember will be mailed out today after
a delay of nearly three weeks, caused
by a rush of work in the publishing
house. In addition to a number of
nscellaneous articles and notes, the
November number contains three con-
tributions of special interest.,
The leading article, entitled, "The
Attaint," is the contribution of J. M.
Zane, a member of the Chicago Bar
association, who receved an honarary
L.L.D. degree from the University of
Michigan in 1914. The other two ar-
ticles, "Direct Primary Legislation in
Michigan," and "The Lability of a
Carrier When the Goods Have Not
Been Received by the Carrier," are the
contributions of A. C. Millspaugh, pro-
fessor of political science in Whitman
College and Howard S. Ross, a mem-
ber of the Montreal Bar association.
SALVATION ARMY TO INVADE
CHINESE REPUBLIC NEXT YEAR
Chicago, Nov. 23. - The "heathen
chinee" will soon be "dropping his yen
on the drum" according to an an-
nouncement made yesterday by Com-
missioner HenryHoward, chief of
staff and second highest officer of the
Salvation Army.
The Chinese republic will be "open-
ed up" during the early part of the
coming year for the work of the or-
ganization. Commissioner Howard,
who arrived in Chicago on Sunday to
conduct a series of special meetings
and to inspect the work of the Salva-
tion Army here, was interviewed yes-
terday.
"Pioneer work has been carried on
by the Salvation Army in China for
some time and next year organization
will be firmly esttablished there," he
said.
The recently inaugurated plan of

the organization to transfer British
women from England to Great Brit-
ain's overseas dominions was declared
by Commissioner Howard to be work-
ing out satisfactorily.
PROF. J. W. GLOVER SUPERVISES
PUBLISHING. OF LIFE TABLES

BUY
NYAL HUSKIES
for throat and
PAPER VESTS
for warmth
at
game

e

VARSITY TOGGERY SHOP
1107 So. Univ.

QUARRY DRUG CO'S.,
Prescription Store
Cor. State & N. University

Takes Pictures
Develops films
makes Prints
and Enlarge-
713 E. Vn mrslty

PHOTOS.

I~

106 E. Huron Street

Opposite Court House

WE GRIND EYE GLASS
LENSES
IN OUR OWN SHOP

DAINES

Time.sFlin -
Order Them NOW-
PERSONAL GREETING CARDS
The samples this year are much more artistic
than usual-Ask to see them-Leave your
order with us for CHRISJMAS ENGRAVING.
Mat 11ta!0
= t. St.
VNIVERSITY BOOKSTORES
=.111111!1111111IIill lU 11ll lsll lllllllllllii ll!lllllllllllllll

GO AND SEE

ABOUT YOUR

HALLER & FULLER
STATE STREET JEWELERS

MICHIGAN ENSIAN

Winter -Wear
FOR MEN

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO.

12 -'2 Special Tea and Rice Served
P'LA I N

HOP SUEY

25c1

day Special 12-5 - - 6oc
cken meal with soup, celery, olives,
ie bread and hot roast pie, Oolong
coffee and miik.
Chigan Inn 611 E. Liberty
Telephone 2082

J EWELERsAlarm Clocks
eiLAND P EYFRIC $1.00 up z
Fountain Pens- 1
SWaterman and ConklinE
U. of M. Jewelry
Schlanderer & Seyfried
ing dialogue, music or lyrics, meet in.
Barbour gymnasium at 3 o'clock Fri-
day.
Girls' Glee club will practice at 10;
o'clock Saturday morning at Newberry
hall instead of Sarah Caswell Angell.
hall as was announced.
Dean Arnold, Miss Stearns, Miss1
Malcomson, and Mrs. Gertrude Martin,
will be in town all day for the purpose
of holding interviews with girls inter-
ested in their special lines of vocation-t
al work. Those who wish such inter-t
views must sign up for a certain timet
on the schedules in Barbour gymnas-z
ium.
f. S. Fetter Attends "Y" Convention{

"Y" TEAM GOESTO ST. JOHN'S
Delegation of Seven Men Leaves for
Up-State City Friday
St. Johns' will be the destination of
the "Y" deputation workers on their
initial trip of the year. A delegation
of seven men will leave Ann Arbor
Friday noon and arrive in St. Johns in
the evening where a general banquet
will be given at which the pur-
pose of the work will be explained and
the influence of the University upon
young men described.
On Saturday forenoon all the busi-
ness men in St. Johns will be visited
and a canvass of the town relating to
the social and moral conditions taken.
In the afternoon of the same day
sports, such as football, basketball,
and indoor baseball will be taken up.
In the evening there will be an in-
formal get-together for the older boys.
Sunday the team will speak at the
Sunday schools and in the evening at
a union service, held in one of the
local churches.
MILITARY SQUAD DRILLS IN
PLATOONS AT PERRY SCHOOL
The military squad, held its week-
ly drill at 7 o'clock, Wbdnesday night,
on the play-ground of the Perry
school. About 60 men attended the
drill which consisted mainly of work
in the platoon formation.
The leaders of the squad are en-
deavoring to interest the campus in
their movement so that they may form
a second squad. The Hay bill pass-
ed by congress is very favorable to-
ward satisfactory college work in mil-
itary training and the would-be sold-
iers here are bending every effort to
meet the requirements. For this rea-!
son all men are strongly urged to join
the company and partake of its many
benefits.
The finest Floral Shop in the city
will open soon in the Nickels Arcade,
State Street. 3-ti

WOMEN'S ENROLLMENT LARGER
Shows Increase of 139 Over Last Year;
Dormitories Responsible
The enrollment of women in the
University is steadily on the increase,
this year reaching the high water
mark of 1,130, an increase of 139 over
last year. The 1915 enrollment showed
a gain of 100 over that of 1914, this
increase being partially due to the
dormitories.
The greatest increase this year was
not, as might be expected, in the
freshman class, but in the junior. How-
ever, the freshman class came next,
followed by the sophomore and senior
classes. A very large percentage of
the increase comes from Detroit and
other cities of about the same size,
showing that there, at least, the pref-
erence for the eastern schools is being
outgrown.
The enrollment of women in the
graduate school has been augmented
considerably.
Last Dollars Are Placed on Display
Students whosaw the display of
silver dollars in the window of a lo-
cal book store Tuesday saw the last
dollars to be coined in the United
States since 1902, and probably the
last that will be coined in this country
for several years. The small demand
for the silver dollar has left the gov-
ernment with a large surplus on its
hands and none have been coined in
recent years. The coins in the dis-
play were made in Philadelphia in
1902.
Sunderland Speaks on Law and Ethics
Prof. E. R. Sunderland of the Law
School will address the Unitarian
Young People's Religious Union at
6:30 o'clock Sunday evening in the
church parlors. His subject will be
"Law and Ethics." Florence B. Pad-
dock, '17, will give a solo.
High grade Kodak Finishing at Sug-
den's.

Wfomen

The second meeting of the vocational
inference will be held at 4 o'clock
is afternoon in Sarah Caswell An-
11 hall. Miss Gertrude Gog:n will
induct the meeting from 7:30 to 8:30
clock this evening at Newberry hall.
A second section of the beginning
ass in aesthetic dancing may be
rmed after the meeting of the class
next Tuesday. This section will
eet at 2 o'clock on Wednesdays. All
ris are to report at the class on
iesday of next week, at which time

Under the supervision of Prof.
James W. Glover, the census bureau
has brought out a series of United
States life tables which are attracting
widespread attention. Although stat-
istic tables of life insurance compan-
ies have been published before in this
country, this is the first publication
devoted to general life tables. They
are intended as a source of informa-
tion for public health officers, students
of vital statistics, physicians, sociolog-
ists, and statisticians. They are also ex-
pected to be of use for legal purposes
in connection with old age pensions.
Guess who sells haberdashery at 119
Main. 21&24
E. S. Jacobus' Flye-Piee Orchestra
for dances, enter aInmexts hi son-
eerts. 620 M. Fifth Ave. Phone 1487.

N. S. Fetter, secretary of the Univer- of Professor Baldwin before the Men-
sity Y. M. C. A., is in Cleveland this orah society of the University of Mich-
week attending the convention of "Y" igan, he having spoken before it last
secretaries now being held in that year on "Job."
city. Among other things, Professor Bald-
win is the editor of the editions of
"KEN" BOUCHER, BELL SOLO- Dickens' "A Tale of Two Cities" and
IST, AT ARMORY TONIGHT. 24 "David Copperfield."

I

ted in writ-:

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