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November 19, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


i &.&L 1

ORDERS FOR
wksgiving, November 3o
should be placed now to
insure prompt delivery.

G.H.
ing Merchant T

Wild Company
Idlors State Street

You will always get a
PERFECT SHAVE
if you use one of our guaranteed
Old Style Razors

L. SWITZER CO.
State St. Hardware
Books of

ROBER.T W. SERVICE

of a Red Cross Man. Spell *Yukon.
Rhymes of a Rolling Stone

Ballads of Cheechako

Slater Book Shop s:-

U

i

ew shoes are stitched with Goodyear Welt machines.
ase same machines for repair work. We believe we
the most modern equipped shoe repair shop in Ann
r. You'll get high class work and courteous treatment
is shop and we think you'll find us worthy of patron-
Our call and deliver service is at your disposal. Use it.
amo Shoe Repairing Co.
ENE 807 301 5. State St.

Official newspaper at the University of
Mr.gan. Published every morning except
Monday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier ;$ 5 by mail, $.00.
Want ad. stations: uarry'; Students' Sp-
ly Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed So words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished i The Daily, at the discretion ofthe
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:0 .'cock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker.........l.Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh.....Business Manager
Conrad N. Church..............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn............City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald ........ Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson. Telegraph Editor
Verne E. Burnett.....-....Associate Editor
Golda Ginsburg............Women's Editor
Carleton W. Reade........Statistical Editor
JE. Campbell... Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip Emery..Assistant Business Manager
Albert E. Hone. .Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau.. Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter...Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
L. S. Thompson E. A., Baumgarth
L. W. Nieter J. L. Stadeker
Reporters
B. A. Swaney C. W. Neumann
W. R. Atlas C. C. Andrews
E. L. Zeigler , H. C. Garrison
Allen Schoenfield C. M. Jiking
Marian Wilson D. S. Rood
Business Staff
Bernard Wobi 5t-. E.Robinson
Paul E. Cholette [arry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Harold J. Lance
Earl F. Ganschow Walter R. Payne
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1916.
Night Editor-J. L. Stadeker
THE FINAL CURTAIN
With the final blow of the time-
keeper's whistle yesterday afternoon,
Michigan's 1916 football season went
into history. There will be many who
will call it a failure. Many will put
it in a class with the few notoriously
poor seasons in the past, simply be-
cause Michigan lost its last two games.
But the 1916 season was decidedly
not a poor season. The team that
started the year with few veterans won
its first seven games, two of them
against strong opponents who had
vanquished the Varsity the year be-
fore. To be sure it lost its last two
games, but in each case only by the
narrow margin of three points. But
mere figures do not reveal the fight-
ing spirit, the enthusiasm, and the de-
termination which characterized the
football team of 1916. Because these
elments were generated in the team
this fall, we consider the season suc-
rlssful. Football at Michigan can
never remain at a standstill. It is
either on the down-grade or the up-
grade. The 1916 team has put it back
on the upward path. When next
year's team starts its practice in the
fall, fresh in its memory will be the
careers of men like Maulbetsch, Dunne.
Rehor, Nlemann, Zeiger, and Whalen.
The work and the fight that these men
displayed will be an inspiration.
Of the 11 men who started the game
yesterday for Michigan, seven will re-
turn to build the football team of 1917.
If these men and the others who step
in to fill the places of the departing
seniors take as big a step forward as

this year's team did, we predict for
them one of the most successful sea-
sons a Michigan team has ever had.
MERE NUMBERS
About 800 years ago, in the "dark
ages," the University of Paris had 12,-
000 students. Abelard (born 1079, died
1142) was one of the famous faculty
men.
University students in the United
States who write home the astound-
ing news that their own university has
reached the astounding figures of 5,-
000, or 7,000, or even 9,000, may get
a helpful tonic of humility out of the
figures of ancient Paris. To make the
lesson of the unimportance of mere
attendance, it is interesting to learn
that there were 45,000 students in a
Russian school during the past cen-
tury. Columbia University in New
York is rapidly speeding toward 20,000.
Many of those who have read the
editorial to this point have probably
done so because they are implicated
in a general fallacy among Americans
that figures spellthe rating of a uni-
versity or college. Numbers certainly
play an important part, but it is look-
ing up to see small colleges like
Princeton carry prestige out of all
proportion to their attendance. Thus
many universities through the west are
undoubtedly beginning to realize that
they have almost no chance of becom-
ing the largest numerically in the na-
tion, and therefore are realizing that
the proposition of having better educa-
tion is as big a factor as the attend-
ance bugaboo.

Q S j rMa%
,, -

UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
10:30-Heaven and Hell; Geography
or Psychology? Address by Rev. R.
S. Loring.
11:45 -- Discussion of Ann Arbor
Health Survey led by Dr. Conrad
George, Jr., before Social Service
Class.
6:30-Young People's Society has ar-
ranged for Illustrated Lecture:-
Masterpieces of Religious Paintings
by Prof. Cross., The public invited.

At 10:30 AM
Rev. John
Andrew
HohnesD.D.
of Champaign.
Urbana. Ill.
will preach

Congregational Church

Ng. 'gumumim

ABOUT YOUR

GO AND SEE

MICHIGANENSIAN

PHOTOS.

WE GRIND EYE GLASS
LENSES
IN OUR OWN. SHOP

Topic: "The Quest of the Angel"

DAINES

""" """""""""""""""""""""""""""""'"""'"""""""""""""""11111 111111 Ii 1111111111 ii
The Books of =
Rabindranath TagoreM
The Cardneer - a - $1.25
Songs of Kabir - - - $1.25
Sadhana - - - $1.25-
iOtanjali - - - $1.28
Chitra - - - - $1.00
The Post-office - - - $1.00
The Crescent Moon - - $1.25
King of the Dark Chamber - - $1.25
The Hungry Stones and Other Stories - $1.25
FOR SALE AT
t. WA HRS'S
VNIVERSITY BOOKSTORES
"l11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111!1111111111 11 iili i i

.
,.

0

fi

;,, ,.,e
...

HALLER ,E& FU LLER
I STATE STREET JEWELERS

ANNOUNCEMENT

7f 7!!

SAM BURCHFIELt

&

CO.

Gives you the best Tailoking service
to be obtained anywhere in the coun-
try, coupled with a wonderful line
of Woolens.

BUY
NYAL HUSKIES
for throat and
PAPER VESTS
for warmth
at
game

Winter Wear
FOR MEN
VARSITY TOGGERY SHOP
1107 So. Univ.

hL

106 E. Huron Street

Opposite Court House

w

i,'

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO.

____r_..
i

2 Special Tea and Rice ServedI

PLAIN
$UEY

-25cl

12-5

- - 6oc

meal with soup, celery, olives,
ead and hot roast pie, Oolong
e and miik.
gan Inn 611 E. Liberty
Telephone 2082
ie advertising columns of the
i Daily in order to reach the
Lnn Arbor's buyers.

Alarm Clocks
AI4'uUER$1.00 up
Fountain Pes-
Watermanasd Coaklna
U. of M. Jewelry
Schlanderer Seyfried
Dr. Cohn to Address Jewish Students
Rabbi Samuel S. Cohn, of Chicago,
will address the Jewish Student Con-
gregation of the University of Michi-
gan at its regular weekly meeting at
6:45 o'clock tonight in Newberry hall.
Dr. Cohn has chosen as his subject,
"Why I Am a Jew.' The public is
cordially invited to attend.
Try a Michigan Daily Want Ad.

First class in advanced aesthetic
dancing will meet o 4 o'clock Monday
Afternoon.
Sophomores, juniors, and seniors re-
port for basketball practice at 5
o'clock Monday afternoon.
Nineteen hundred and sixteen girls
will hold a reunion breakfast at 9
o'clock this morning, at the Renellen
Hospice.
Tickets for the vocational confer-
ence luncheon Saturday noon, Nov. 25,
are on sale at Wahr's, or may be ob-
tained from Julia Renwick, '17, at 814
S. University avenue.

WL~omen

I

,

QUARRY DRUG CO'S.
Prescription Store
Cor. State & N. University E
Canadian Club Holds Meeting Tuesday
A general meeting of the Canadian
club will be held next Tuesday at the
Michigan-Union, at 7:30 o'clock. All
Canadians who are not now members
of the club are invited to be present.
Football Programs Sell Rapidly
Souvenir programs for the Michi-
gian-Pennsylvania football game went
fast yesterday, according to Edward
E. Mack, '17, editor of the athletic
programs. The entire edition, with the
exception of 100 still on sale at the
book stores, consisting of 5,200 books,
were sold out last night.

Cross to Discuss Religious Paintings
"Masterpieces of Religious Paint-
ings" will be the subject of an illus-
trated lecture to be given by Prof. H.
R. Cross, of the fine arts department,
before the Unitarian Young People's
Religious union, at 6:30 o'clock to-
night. The general public is invited
to attend.

Mr's akesPictures
Develops Films
Swainmakes Prints
and Enlarge-
713 L. m-ifraty

Watch for the grand opening of A
Arbor's Finest Floral Shop. Nick
Arcade. 3
Leave your film at the Delta.
hour service.

Daily for service.

~ y ~ 4i~it~J~j
1'
L-L)
I. #41

Overcoat

Time

1 ' 1
r..

7'" I_

Smart dressers express profound surprise at
the vastness of our display of overcoat fabrics
in both our ready-to-use and made-to-order
overcoatings.
We are showing some "CORKING" new
models that you'll appreciate the minute you
set eyes on them, and if you will just pay us a
visit, we'll clearly and definitely demonstrate
the superior features of our showing in
Overcoats.

_N
}
I
v, .
1
i

nn
els
3-tf
24

cv .,

-.- o

J. K.

MALCOLM
604 E. LIBERTY

T H E LIBE R TY

THE MALCOLM

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