100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 19, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FOR ANN ARBOR-
SUNDAY-FAIR WITH LITTLE
CHANGE IN TElMPERATURE

op.

UNITED PRESS WIRE
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
TIE ONLY MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

i r NrTri

ITT wv_ "n

L. XXVI. No. 42.

ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN. SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 19. 1916.

PTo!w. VinrV

__. . _ - - .. , .. .Al .JA.AJ. u.

INTEREST INAR
GENTERS AROUND
BULGARFGTN
FALL OF MONASTIR REGARDED
AS I31MINENT BY
LONDON
BELGIUM MAY BE RELINQUISHED
Paris Reports Repulselof German At-
tack North of Persy; British
Forces Advance
London, Nov. 18.-With a period of
comparative calm reigning along the
Somme, war interest centers tonight
on the Bulgarians. London regards
the fall of Monastir as imminent.
Serbian and Russian troops at last
report that they have the city for
which Bulgarians hold such sentiment-
al regard almost occupied. Its forti-
fications are within reach of the allied
guns. Monastir's fall is expected to
have an important effect on the morale
of the Bulgar and Teutonic troops.
Violent fighting was reported from
the Macedonian front tonight in the
German official statement. The Berlin
press bureau's summary of Roumanian
conditions declares the Bulgarian army
to have been comparatively-exhausted.
Statements from Bucharest, however,
insist that the Roumaniai lines are
being firmly maintained.
Washington, Nov. 18.-The possible
preliminary and at least partial evacu-
ation of Belgium was interpreted by
army officers here as being the out-
come of the reported German plan to
deport 300,000 Belgian citizens to the
interior of Germany. -
It was recalled the Russian author-
ities talked of a similar step when,
after their drive into East Prussia at
the beginning of the war, they found
themselves obliged to retreat into Po-
land. Before the withdrawal was be-
gun, German captive citizens were sent
into the interior of Russia, where they
are now interned.
The practice of deporting civilians
captured during .and before evacua-
tion is a common one, it is stated. It
is done to prevent the civilians from
harassing the retreating army and
from aiding their enemies.
Paris, Nov. 18.-Repulse of the Ger-
man attack north of Persy, five miles
south of Peronne, was announced in
the official statement tonight. Else-
where along the front there was in-
termittent artillery bombardment.
Rome, Nov. 18.-Pope Benedict has
made a move for peace to the Teutonic
powers against attacks on civilians, it
was reported tonight.
London, Nov. 18.-British forces have
reached the outskirts of Grandcourt
In their advance south of Ancre, Gel-
eral Haig reported tonight.
FOUR KILLED IN AUTO RACE
John Aitkins, Driving Peugeot, Is Win-
ner of Grand Prix
Santa Moscia, Cal., Nov. 18.-Four
persons were killed and several in-
jured during the Grand Prix automo-
bile race here this afternoon, when

a Marmon car driven by Louis Jackson
left the track and crushed through a
row of. trees lining the course.
Jackson was instantly killed, but
his mechanician escaped with slight
injury. The other dead are: Harold
Degerton, an unidentified woman spec-
tator, and H. P. Jenkins, a Keystone
traveling man, who was close to the
course. The race was won by John
Aitkin, driving a Peugeot car, at an
average of 85.59 miles an hour.

I

A Woman 's Viev
of the Grid Ba ttle
She Thiiiks It Would Have Been Nicer
If PenIsy Hadn't Gotten
So Many Points
By Mildred Mighell.
It would have been such a nice
game, if we hadn't let Pennsy get so

Berry Stopped Near Wolverine Goal

MICHIGAN DEFEATED BY PENN MEN,
IN STUBBORNLY FOUG[HT CONTEST ON
FERRY1 FIELD BY SCORE OF 10 'TO

7

many points, or rather, if we had got
ten more ourselves. That mistak
was the only thing that detracted from
the general satisfactoriness of it. I
was a perfectly lovely day and ther
were such perfectly lovely people, an
also some men, in the stands, and th
band was awfully pretty.
The first touchdown was simply sick.
ening, it was so easy. The man it
front of me who had been saying "ata-
boy" every time' anything happened
said that the play'was ragged during
the first quarter. I don5t think he
could have been a true son of Michi-
gan for he called one of our men, who
really looked like a marvelous player,
a "big lunkhead" and absolutely all
the poor boy had done was to slip
down and drop the ball. A man can't
help things like that sometimes.
Penn Close to Our GoaL.
All this time the football game was
going on and they seemed to be keep-
ing close to our goal, which was really
very dangerous for us, because it
seems that our side always scores at
the other side's goal. After a while
it was the end of the quarter, and we
changed goals, but the play was still
quite close to ours. I don't see why
the umpire lets them play all the time
near to one goal. It isn't fair to the
side whose goal it is. And what hap-
pened, proved this, for right away a
Penn man kicked the ball over our bar
right between the posts and - that
counted three for them. And of course,
he never could have done it if the um-
pire hadn't allowed all the play so
near our goal.
Vi ire Unfair to Michigan.
But after that he did give our team
a fair start and we made the most
wonderful kick, about three times as
long as the one for which they got
three points, and the ball actually
reached the goal line, but it didn't
count one single thing.
Well, then we fell on them twice
and pushed them back to their goal
and you could see there was blood in
our eyes. But we tried to do a for-
ward pass, and just as one of our men
reached up to get the ball, a Penn man
jumped and got it, simply snatched it
away from him. To serve them right
for that they had to kick, and Sparks,
or somebody caught it, but he slipped.
That field was horribly slippery, and
somebody fell on Sparks so he couldn't
get up. After that, a Penn man was
hurt, or winded, or maybe tired. Any-
way, they stopped a while andythe
other men tied their shoestrings. Then
we made a long kick, but it didn't
count either.
Smith Needs the Green Bottle.
They had to carry the green bottle
out for one of our team that quarter,
a man named Smith, I guess. My
friend, "Ataboy," says, "It's pretty even
now, they can't gain and neither can
we." Anyway, the ball was in their
half of the field. The umpire was try-
ing to make up for the damage he did
in the first quarter probably.
Those Penn men like to play awfully
well. Some knocked our line over be-
fore it was time. They got penalized
or peenalized, whichever it is. But
about that time it was the end of the
half and the band marched and we
sang the "Yellow and Blue" 'and we
were so thrilled it almost made our
feet warm. A dove with Michigan
streamers flew overhead. It wasn't
quite so attractive as Don McGee, but
almost. The Pennsy rooters must have
sent it up as a signal for "peace-at-
any-price."
Third Quarter Best of All.
The third quarter was simply im-
mense. We had the ball all the time,
and made more long kicks and downs
and runs and everything imaginable.
(Continued on Page Six.)

BERRY, EASTERNERS' FULLBACK, RESPONSIBLE FOR TOUCHDOWN
IN FIRST QUARTER AND FIELD GOAL IN SEC-
OND DIVISION

PAT SMITH GOES OVER FOR TOUCHDOWN IN FOURTH PERIOD

Game Is Evenly Contested, But Phiielphlans Get Jump at Start Which
Paves Way to Victory; Crowd One of Largest Ever
Seen at Ferry Field

l

-Photo by Dames

SAY VILLA'S BANDITS
KILLED PARRAL CATTLE.

VOCATIONAL CONFERENCE
TO BE HELD THIS WEEK

It's a time- honored and im
that both teams can't win. One o
Michigan lost yesterday.
The final score was 10 to 7 an
back to enliven and awaken staid an
It was a hard battle to lose. P
a defense that was rather extravag
land." If Michigan were dubious a
pelled by 4 o'clock. The Quaker lin
and fulfilled every claim.
E

Chinese
of

Refugees Report Murdering
Their Countrymen in
Mexico

Thursday,
Days

Friday, and Saturday
Set for Women's Meet-
ing Here

Are

El Paso, Texas, Nov. 18.-According
to Chinese refugees from Jiminez, it
was reported here today that all of
the cattle at Parral were slaughtered
when Villa and his bandits entered
the latter town 15 days ago. Six
Americans are known to have been
in Parral before the Villa raid.
Such a report has been reaching the
border for several days, but efforts to
obtain confirmation have met little
success. Scores of terrorized Chinese,
Assyrians, and Spaniards living in
northern Mexico are on their way to
the border to escape the atrocities of
Villa. Twenty-three Chinese refugees
arrived at Juarez today. They told
the United States deportation agent
that already many of their country-
men had been slaughtered and tor-
tured.
The United States authorities esti-
mated tonight that no less than 100
Chinese have been slain by bandits in
the last four months.
Washington, Nov. 18.-Secretary of
the Interior Lane, chairman of the
American-Mexican peace commission,
and Secretaries Lansing and Baker
conferred together tonight with Presi-
dent Wilson over instructions concern-
ing the commission. The apparent dis-
inclination of Lord Caprera, Mexican
chairman, to agree to the proposed
peace plans was the cause of the
meeting.
Dr. W. Gilman Thompson Resigns
Ithaca, Nov. 18.-Dr. W. Gilman
Thompson, who has been professor of
medicine at Cornell University Medical
College since its foundation in 1898,
has resigned to devote himself to pri-
vate professional work. He has been
appointed professor of medicine emer-
itus, and in that capacity will retain
his interest in the university.

Thursday, Friday, and Saturday of-
this week are the days set for the
vocational conference held annually
under the auspices of the Women's
league. At the first meeting, which
will be held at 4 o'clock Thursday aft-
ernoon, Dean Sarah Arnold, of Sim-
mons College, Miss Letitia Stearns, of
the- Milwaukee public liberary, and
Miss Mary Malcomson, of the Detroit
Collegiate Bureau of Occupations, will
be the speakers. Thursday evening
there will be an informal reception at
Newberry residence to which all girls
are cordially invited.
At 4 o'clock Friday afternoon,. Mrs.
Gertrude Martin, of the Association
of Collegiate Alumnae, Miss Gertrude
Gogin, industrial work secretary
of the National Y. W. C. A., and Tal-
cott Williams, of the Columbia School
of Journalism, will address the confer-
ence. Miss Gogin will speak again
Friday evening at Newberry hall,
when a short meeting will be held
from 7:30 to 8:30 o'clock, allowing
girls to hear her without giving up
other plans for the evening.
Saturday morning's program has
been announced and includes address-
es by Miss Elizabeth Harcourt on "So-
cial Nursing," Miss Mary Marshall on,
,the work of the state board of health,
and Mrs. Victor C. Vaughan, Jr., on
the work of the city board of health.
A luncheon at 12:15 o'clock Satur-
day in Barbour gymnasium, will
close the conference. Golda Gins-
burg, '18, will act as toastmistress and
there will be several short talks. Miss
Malcomson will be there for the pur-
pose of actual registration, and will
tell those interested how to secure
positions in various vocations.
Except in the- two instances noted,
all meetings of the conference will be
held in Sarah Caswell Angell hall, and
(Continued on Page Six.)

FOOTBALL RESULTS
East.
Yale, 10; Princeton, 0.
Brown 21; Harvard, 0.
Cornell, 37; Mass. Aggies, 0.
Colgate, 15; Syracuse, 0.
West.
Northwestern, 38; Purdue, 6.
Chicago, 20; Illinois, 7.
Notre Dame, 14; M. A. C. 0.
0. S. U., 28; Case, 0.
Minnesota, 54; Wisconsin, 0.
WILL HOLD FIRST REHEARSAL
"Spotlight Vaudeville" Acts. to Be
Tried Out Today
At 3 o'clock today the first rehearsal
of the ,Michigan Union "Spotlight
vaudeville" will be held at the Union.
Don Smith, '17E, chairman of the
entertainment, stated last night that
although a great deal of the best ma-
terial on the campus had come out for
the show, there is still room for some
more singers and dancers.
Glen Coulter, '18L, president of the
Union, is in charge of the ticket dis-
tribution. Tickets will be placed on
sale for non-Union members next
week. All Union members and pledged
life members will be admitted free.
They may secure tickets by applying'
at the Union.
ATTEMPT TO FORCE ENTRANCE
TO -STAND RESULTS IN ARREST
E. S. Keache, of Detroit, was ar-
rested yesterday for attempting to
force an entrance into the south stand
at Ferry field. He was put out twice
by Officer Emil Sodt for not having
a ticket. The third time he used of-
fensive language and was arrested
after a fight. He was locked up in the
county jail, from which he was later
bailed out by friends. He will appear
in court Monday.
An automobile, belonging to Mr. J.
F. Williamson of Pontiac, was stolen
on Hill street while the owner was
watching the football game.
C. A. Rickman of Lansing was ar-
rested for speeding at a rate of 40
miles per hour on Packard street. He
was arraigned before Justice William
G. Doty and fined $10 and $3.45 costs.
Firestone Company Plans Welfare
New York, Nov. 18.-A welfare and
insurance fund of $1,000,000 was au-
thorized for employes of the Firestone
Tire and Rubber company by a resolu-
tion adopted at the annual meeting of
the stockholders yesterday.
THE PENNSY EXTRA
Copies of the green Pensy extra can
be obtained at The Daily office or Cush-
ing's.

mutable decree of fate which rules
*f them has to lose.
d the cherished and coveted "10" goes
d sober Philly,
ennsylvania came to Ann Arbor with
ently characterized as "the best in the
t 2 o'clock all doubts had been dis-
e performed exactly "as advertised"
The Wolverines meanwhile per-
formed with equal valor ad eclat
after a disasterous introduction, and
if - the teams were booked for a re-
turn engagement on Ferry field tomor-
Tow afternoon, he who dared to hazard
a prediction as to the outcome of the
fray would be viewed with apprehen-
sion and proclaimed an expert or an
idiot.
Pennsylvania got the jump on the
Wolverines. The game was won within
200 seconds of the time it opened.
Pennsylvania's line deserves the lion's
share of the credit for the visitors'
victory, but if they erect any memor-
ials to individual heroes down there
in Philadelphia, the name of Berry
will be inscribed upon the first.
Berry, the erratic, sensational
Berry, was instrumental in that first-
touchdown. Berry, who has been ac-
cased of everything from being of All-
American caliber on down to the rank
of logical substitute for the end on
the sophomore literary class laggrega-
tion, was the biggest man on the field
for a few moments.
Berry is fresh from the Mexican
border and someone must have whis-
pered "greasers" In his ear when the
game began, for he picked up a punt
on the 35-yard line and skipped right
straight back through the whole Michi-
gan team, and wasn't thrown until he
was within 11 yards of the Michigan
line. Bell and Derr lugged the precious
leather right up to within three feet
of the final stripe and the ball was
again entrusted to Berry. The boy
from the border ran around end and
crossed over for a touchdown.
Pennsylvania's other three points
were also contributed by the inimit-
able Mr. Berry. The Pennsylvanian
can run hundreds,-put the shot, play
third base, man a machine gun, and
do a whole lot of other fine things,
and just to show tiat there's no limit
he drop-kicked a field goal. This shot
came from the 25-yard line, and it-
was a perfect bull's eye. After this
dazzling exhibition, Mr. Berry sub-
sided. The Michigan aggregation be-
gan to play A-1 football every minute
and Berry might just as well have
been down doing sentry duty for the
United States army on the border.
The Michigan team deserves lots of
credit. In fact, it deserves just as
much as Pennsylvania. It doesn't de-
serve any more but after that initial
relapse, they started playing in the
way they should and everything was
lovely-that is, everything but that
horrible score.
Michigan's touchdown came on a
drive down the field from the 50-yard
line. A 25-yard penalty assisted ma-
terially, but Michigan fought for every
inch of the rest of the distance, and
they earned their seven little counters
when big Pat Smith went over for a
touchdown. L. Wray, playing center
(Continued on Page Six.)

Presbyterian Church
HURON and DIVISION STS.

10:30 A.

M. Leonard A. Barrett, speaks;
"The Dial of Ahaz."
Noon:- Class for University Women
Prof. Thos. E. Rankin
Class for University Men
Mr. J. L. Zwickey

Wesleyan Guild Lecture
Cora Wilson Stewart
President of the Illiteracy Commission of Kentucky
Subject: MOONLIGHT SCHOOLS
To-nights*
7:0 Methodist Church Tfi3ngh

DR.

WARTHIN'S

LECTURE

a

Te Lecture begins PROMPTLY at 7 P. M. (Doors closed at 7:10 P. M.)

w evening Dr. Warthin delivers the last of his series of Sex Hygiene Lectures to Male University Freshmen.
Tickets may be had during the day at the University "Y" office free of charge.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan