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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 17, 1916 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Just received another lot of those

II

DON'T

U

I jl- A

Suits,

Hats

I

Caps and
Furnishings

,
, k
4 ;
' ."
...
".,,,...r ,., y

at

$3.50

Sheep Lined Coat
And
Patricks Mackinaw

Feather Weight Soft Hats

To Get Your

I WADHAMS &cO.o
MAIN ST.

Tinker &Company
Clothes, Furnishings and Hats
for
Particular Men.
Cor. S. State and William Sts.

At The

J. F. WUERTH CO.
New Day Light Store next to Orpheum

State St. Store
Nickels Arcade

The Plaything of a Child Becomes
the Greatest Wealth of a Nation

WE DO

I

Winter Wear
FOR MEN

w

This Store aims to Serve it's

PATRONS WELL=
To give the best value possible'
for the lowest price possible is the best service any store can
render.

Women's and Children's Apparel

,_., d' a
A..f

Main and Liberty Sts.

U;

_ ® -

The
Cyc-Corpus Jluris

Miss J. E. Jacobs of Kimberly, South
Africa, talks on diamonds in the sixth
article of a series about that coun-
try.
"It's mine, give it to me!"
"No, it is not; I saw it first"
The old farmer was compelled to
lay aside his pipe and go to see what
the children were quarreling over. He
found that the bone of contention was
a small crystal-like pebble not larger
than a marble.' To settle the differ-
ence he picked up the stone, put it in
his pocket, and walked away.
A few days later a trader, O'Reilly,
happened to pass that way and see-
ing the stone on the table was at-
tracted by its unusual brilliancy. The1
farmer noticed his interest, and gave
it to him. The trader, convinced that
it was something more than a crystal,
sent itto a mineralogist who proved
it to be a diamond.
At this time, , 1868, a systematic
search was begun, thousands of for-
tune hunters swarming over the des-
erts to dig where the town of Kim-
berly now stands. Untold sufferings
and privations were forgotten in their
eagerness to find the coveted stones. In
no time at all a canvas city stood
where a few days before bad been arid
waste.
Diamonds were plentiful; and the
town grew rapidly both in size and
lawnessness. There are people still
living* who will tell with a shake of
the head of the dreadful events that
took place in "The Camp" and then
smile and say that they were good
times when money was no object and
gold was so plentiful that often times
it would not buy silver.
In 1871 the first incorporated mines
were opened, the chief of which were
the Dutoitspan, De Beers, Buitfontein
and Kimberly mines.

A diamond mine is not, as many
people imagine, a hole in the ground.
It consists of a network of tunnels
and "drives" which run in all direc-
tions and at various levels from the
main shaft.
One steps from the steel cage into
brilliantly lighted tunnels, the lowest
of which is 2,160 feet below the sur-
face. Here are seen the Kaffirs or
South African negroes shoveling the
blue earth into trucks which are sent
to the pulsators where the diamond-
ferous dirt is crushed and sorted.
The puverized earth is then mixed
with huge volumes of water and run
over greased tables which retain the
diamonds, but allow the waste ma-
terials to pass over. This waste ma-
terial is, however, sorted by hand in
case the tables have missed a few of
the precious stones.
This hand sorting is done by con-
victs who, of course, have littlebchance
to steal. The Kaffirs are kept in com-
pounds which they cannot leave while
in employ of the company. Before
leaving they are subjected to a severe
examination, for a native is adept in
concealing stolen diamonds.;
Diamonds to the value of $20,000,000
are sold from the mines every year,
the United States taking about 60 per
cent.
South Africa produces 991-2 per
cent of fall the diamonds produced in
the world. The largest stone ever
found came from the Premir mine
near Pretoria, and "weighed approxi-
mately one and one-half pounds. It
was cut into smaller portions, the larg-
est weighing about 900 carats, repos-
ing in the sceptre of the British king.
Thus the plaything of a child be-
came the valued possession of a king
and a large part of the wealth of a
nation.

1107 So. Univ.

Our Beautiful Dance and Banquet
Programs still continue to be one of
the many pleasant surprises and main
topics at the parties.

VARSITY TOGGERY SHOP

11

THE MAYER-SCHAIRER CO.
112 S. Main

t'

TYPEWRITING
MULTIGRAPHING
MIMEOGRAPHING
Typewriters for sale or rent.
Hamilton Business College

Yellow. Chrysanthemums
For the Pennsy. Game
A large supply at moderate prices. Delivered to all parts
of the city. Order early.

PUBLISHED BY
The American Law Book Cox
27 Cedar Street
NEW YORK.
CHOP off a few
minutes and eat some of
GEORGE'S SUEY
WAK RWINO LOo
314 S. State St. Phone 1244-M
DISCOVER STOCK SWINDLE IN
WARE OF NEW FARII LOAN LAW
Washington, Nov. 16.-In the wake
of the farm loan law there has de-

ized with any intention of helping out
the farmers; therefore the anti-pro-
motion expenses regulation.
It is not intended, the board said,
to hit legitimate farm loan banks. But
in many cases there is evidence that
needy farmers are being mulcted by
the holding out of anywhere from 15
to 50 per cent for "promotion." To
make a bank legitimate, the money
garnered from the sale of stock must
be available for loans to farmers-not
for expenses to promoters, it was said.

FIRST CLASS ROSES and CARNATIONS
Fresh every day

We can make you a very artistic Basket
of Flowers from our large assortment.

Corsages a Specialty

veloped a new swindle, the farm loan I

T. WILLIAMS, '15, PRESENTS
NEW WAR DRAMA THIS MONTH

board said today-selling farmers
stock in joint land banks through
fake farm loan associations formed
principally to furnish to promoters and
stock salesmen the wherewithal to eat
and sleep and go to an occasional
show.
The board has passed regulations in-
tended to stop the sale of stock by
falke associations. The regulations
~state that no joint stock land bank
shall be recognized when money has
been spent on its promotion, andnfor-
bids recognition of the banks: until
organization of the federal land banks.
Swindlers, the board said, have op-
erated by selling the farmers $50
shares in farm loan associations for
$100-the surplus fifty going for "pro-
motion." Of that $50, too, $25' goes
to the salesman. In most cases, it was
said, such companies are not organ-

John Tyler Williams, '15, will put
on the market his latest play, "The
Mighty War God and the Angel Love,"
before the end of this month. The
play is a war drama and has for .its
theme a conflict between the powers
of love and war.
Mr. Williams is at present making
his home in New London, Conn. While
at the University he wrote several
moving picture scenarios which were
accepted.
Tickets for Saturday Dance Sold Out
Tickets for the Michigan Union's
Pennsy dance Saturday night have all
been sold out. There are still a
number of tickets left for tonight's
dance, however. These will sell at
$1.25 and will include refreshments.
GREEN PENNSY EXTRA TOMOR-
ROW .

TAGORE PRAISES INDIAN PLAY
Expresses Approval of "Magic Car-
pet"; Cosmopolitan Club Drama
During his stay in Ann Arbor, Sir
Rabindranath Tagore was shown a
copy of the Cosmopolitan club play by
his host, Dr. N. S. Hardikar. He read
it with the greatest interest until he
came to the Hindu scene. "This plot
was not written by an American," he
said. Asked what he thought of the
"Magic Carpet," he responded that the
whole thing was very good. As he was
particularly interested in the repre-
sentation of his own country he con-
fined most of his remarks to that part
of the play.
"The plot is excellent," he went on.
"It will give the people of Ann Arbor'
a better idea of the stage in India.
The words which the author puts in
the mouths of the characters could not
be improved on."
Interviewed by a Daily reporter yes-
terday Dr. Hardikar, at whose home
Mr. Tagore was entertained while in
town, took the opportunity to express
his gratification at Mr. Tagore's un-
qualified approval of the scene.
"You know," he said, "such a play
or scene has never before been given
in America. The students at Californ-
ia, it is true, gave an Indian play, but
that was written in the sixth century,
and gave no picture of life.today. In
this, however, the modern east and
the modern west both are shown. We
cannot convey everything, but we think
it will convey a message to the stu-
dents."

AMANDUS IS SAD, THE MARINES
CAN'T TAKE PORCH-CLIMBERS
New York, Nov. 16.-Because he is
a good porch-climber, rifle shooter,
and has other marked accomplish-
ments, Amandus Kessler wants to get
out of jail at Easton, Pa., and become
a fighter for Uncle Sam in the ranks
of the United States marine corps, ac-
cording to an appealing letter ad-
dressed to the marine, recruiting sta-
tion in this city.
Amandus wrote several pages in his
patriotic outburst, and promised to use
his influence to awaken his fellow
prisoners to the call of the flag, if the
marines would only come and get him
out.
Although the young man claims to
be a good "healthy feller," unfortun-
ately his morals are not in the same
flourishing condition so Amandus and
his pals must languish in prison while
the marine corps remains heartless
but uncontaminated.
Extra Waiters Wanted at the Union
Owing to the fact that the Michigan
Union will be open to guests as well
as members Saturday and Sunday,
there are positions open for a dozen
or more student waiters. Waiters will
be paid by the hour and given their
meals besides. Students desiring to
work should telephone "Denny" or
leave their applications at the Union
today.
Laundry cases-Another huge ship-
ment received at Wahr's University
book store. 12-17
IM

To Friend out of the City
In any part of the country
By means of a telegraph system operating 'between
Florists all over the country, you can order flowers from us
for delivery in any city or place you designate, within a few
hours' time.
We are members of
The Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association
which is your guarantee 'for satisfactory delivery and value
received for your money.

COUSINS & HALL
1002.So. University Avenue

K

W a t c h f o r t h e
OREEN PENNSY EXTRA
on the streets immediately
after the game. .;. . . . .

Leave your film at the Delta.
hour service.

24

1

Leave Copy
at
Quarry's and
Te Delta

LASS IE
ADVERTISI NG

Leave Copy
at
Students'
Supply Store

1

WOMAN'S SUFFRAGE "SCHOOL"
OPENS SESSION IN BALTIMORE
To Give Courses in Political Organ-
ization and Practical Cam-
paigning
Baltimore, Nov. 16.-This is the first
week of "school" for the suffragists
from many parts of the United States
attending the suffrage school opened
here under the auspices of the Nation-
al American Woman Suffrage associ-
ation.
Classes in political organization'
public speaking, suffrage history and
argument, legislative and federal
work, and press and publicity are now
in full swing and the ardent "pupils"
are deep in the lessons of suffrage'
campaigning.
A model open air meeting was held
in the streets of Baltimore last night,
at which suffrage speeches from a
decorated automobile, heckling crowds
and all other features of such a gath-
ering were demonstrated.
Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt, presi-,
dent of the National association will
arrive tomorrow to give lectures both
tomorrow and Saturday on organiza-
tion, legislative and federal work, and
will address a large public meeting
on Friday night. The "school" will
close on Saturday.
The Baltimore "school" is but the
first of the series that the National
Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Packard Academy. 18-tf
A play by play account of the game
in the GREEN PENNSY EXTRA to-
morrow,

association will open throughout al
the non-suffrage states, suifragists i
many parts of the country having aslk
ed for a short course of this kind
Mrs. Catt has arranged to have on
"school" in each of these states pre
pare the workers !or the 1917 cam
paigns.
FACULTY MAN RECEIVES LETTE]
FROM AUSTRALIAN EXPLORE]
Word has been received by a men
ber of the faculty from Sir Dougla
Mawson, the eminent Australian ex
plorer, Who lectured in Ann Arbor las
year and who is now in charge of th
military embarcation of munition
from England to Russia with head
quarters at Liverpool. It will be re
membered that he was knighted by th
king of E~ngland for his bravery i
exploring large areas upon the Antar
tic continent. His account of the ex
pedition entitled "The Home of th
Blizzard" is in the Library of the Uni
versity.
From the letter from Sir Douglas i
is learned that Lady Mawson has lef
Australia, their native home, to joi
her husband in Liverpool and that o
her way to England she may stop ove
in Ann Arbor.
Expect Kemp to Succeed Sam Itughe
Ottawa, Ontario, Nov. 16.-It is gen
erally conceded that Honorable A. I
Kemp 'of Toronto, minister withou
portfolio in the Borden cabinet, is t
succeed Sir Sam Hughes, who rE
signed at the premier's request a
minister of militia. Kemp has acte
in that capacity on several occasion
during Hughes' absence.

WANTED
WANTED-Will pay $1.25 and ticket
to Barbour gym dance for ticket to
Union dance and supper for Sat-
urday, Nov. 18. Call 433-M. 17
WANTED - Experienced salesman,
wanted immediately for afternoons
and Saturdays. Apply -Mack & Co.
16-17-18
WANTED-Boys to sell Pennsy extras.
Apply at Daily office today between
3 and 4 o'clock.
WANTED-Two seats together for
Penn game, souh stand preferred.
Call 1328 at noon. 17
WANTED-Work for board by ex-
perienced student. Box 2 Michigan
Tl., t_ 17 4 10

MISCELLANEOUS
TYPEWRITERS of all makes
bought, sold, rented or ex-
changed. Expert repairing,
factory service. Sole agent Under-
wood & Corona. TYPEWRITING,
MIMEOGRAPHING & SUPPLIES.
0. D. MORRILL, 322 S. State St.
(Over Baltimore Lunch). 582-J.
LOST.
LOST-Blue overcoat taken from Med-
ical bldg., Tuesday afternoon. Re-
ward'if returned to Howard Heffern,
Theta Delta Chi house, 910 ,Corn-
well.-17
LOST-Ring of keys between Medic
Building and Psi Omega Fraternity.
Finder please call 1920-J. 16-17

The best place to try out
VICTRWOLA RECORDS
Is in your own home
Our Approval Service
permits you to do this
Call us up and ask us about it.

Grinnell Bros.

116 S. Marra. St.
PHONE 1707

I

I.

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