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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 10, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

®w

G. H. Wild Co.
Leading Merchant Tailors
State St.

You will always get a
PERF ECT SHAVE
if you use one of our guaranteed
Old Style Razors
H.L.SWITZER CO.
-H.'LState St. Hardware
GET YOUR
NARCISSUS BULBS
FOR YOUR
CIRISTMAS GIFTS
A T
Slater Book Shop 3.$$

Official newspaper at the University of
Mi-%ygan. Published every morning except
M inday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier $2.5o; b mail, $3.0
Want ad. stations : 6uarry's ; Students' Sup-
ply Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 3os words1
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor'
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the westl
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 3o'clockeach
evening.j
John C. B. Parker..........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church...............News Editor4
Lee E. Joslyn...... ......... .City Editor
Harold, A. Fitzgerald...... Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor
Verne E. Burnett...........Associate Editor
Golda Ginsburg.............Women's Editor
Carleton W. Reade.........Statistical Editor
J E. Campbell... Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip Emery.. Assistant Business Manager
Albert E. Hone.. Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau....Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter...Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
L. S. Thompson E. A. Baumngarth
L. W. Nieter J. tL. Stadeker
Reporters
B. A. Swaney Reotr C. W. Neumann
W. R. Atlas C. C. Andrews
E. L. Zeigler HI. C. Garrison
Allen Schoenfield C. M. Jickling
Marian Wilson D. S. Rood
Business Staff
Bernard WollJ. E. Robinson
Paul E. Cholette Harry 1<. Louis
E. Reed Hunt Harold T. Lance
Eal F. Ganschow Walter f. Payne
Harold Makinson
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1916.
Night Editor-i. C. Garrison.

SUFFRI AAVCTSTO
HVE SCHOOL IN SOUTH
Prominent Women to Give Courses in
Baltimore for Intensive
Training
New York, Nov. 9.-A national
school for suffragists will be opened
in Baltimore Nov. 13, under the direc-
tion of the National American Woman
Suffrage association for one week's in-
sive training. During that week, suf-
fragists from far and near will come
together for training in suffrage his-
tory, argument, parlimentary law,
public speaking, organization and pub-
licity, under such expert tutors as

. ininunnun o 111111111111 11111111111111111111111111111 1i111111111111111 1/111111111lii II{1111'
E ENGINEER =
That job of LETTERING would be
done much more EASILY, QUICKLY
and NEATLY with the use of a
SR UST L ETTER ING SCALE E
Priced $1.25 Ask to see it.
- aW
VNIVER.SITY BOOKSTORES -
-IlII h11111111111t11111111111111111111111111llI~t111111111111111111111 111111111 11ll I t111111111111

r

-1

1 new shoes are stitched with Goodyear Welt machines,
e use same machines for repair work. We believe we
ive the most modern equipped shoe repair shop in Ann
rbor. You'll get high class work and courteous treatment
this shop and we think you'll find us worthy of patron-
e. Our call and deliver service is at your disposal. Use it.
Famous Shoe Repairing Co.
HONE 807 301 S. State St.

Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt, president
of the national association, Mrs. Arth-
ur Livermore and Mrs. H. W. Wilson,
of the, New York State Woman Suf-
frage party, and Mrs. Rose Geyer, of
Iowa.
These experienced suffrage workers
will put the pupils through their paces
according to the most successful cam-
paign methods, and will not only teach
lessons and give rules, but will also
demonstrate their tactics with model
debates, street meetings and other con-
crete forms of suffrage activity. The
street meeting will be conducted
from a decorated automobile and with
its surrounding crowd and hecklers
will run true to the form of the aver-
age suffrage meeting in the street.
Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt, who is
conceded to be the most experienced
suffrage campaigner in the United
States, will show the suffragists how
to organize and conduct a local polit-
ical campaign, Mrs. Arthur Livermore
will give the instruction in public
speaking, taking up voice, enunciation,
practical speaking points and speech
material, and the psychology of var-
ious kinds of crowds, Mrs. Wilson will
conduct the classes in suffrage history
and argument, and Mrs. Geyer will
have the classes in press work and
publicity.
Similar suffrage schools will be
opened by the National American Wo-
man Suffrage association early next
January in all of the thirty-six states
where women have not yet secured the
ballot.

GO AND SEE
DAINES
ABOUT YOUR
MICHIGAN ENSIAN.
PHOTOS.

-. ~i'

WE GRIND EYE

GLASS

LENSES
IN OUR OWN SHOP

-1

DETROIT UNITED LINES
etween Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
rs run on Eastern time, one hour faster
local time.
etroit Limited and Express Cars--8:ro a
nd hourly to 7:10 p. in., 9:10 p. m.
:lamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. in. and
y two hours to 6:48 p. in.; to Lansing,
icsnExpress Cars--(Local stops west of
Arbor)- :48 a. m. and every two hours
1.48 p. im.
acal Cars Eastbound-5:35 a. m, 6:4o a.
7:o5 a. m. and every two hours to 7:05 P.
8 :05 p. n., 9:05 p. in., 10:50 p. 1i. to
ianti only, 9:20 a. n., 9:50 a. m., 2:05 p.
:o5 P. in, 11:45 p. in., i :1o a. in., 1:;.o
. To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
ocal Cars Westbound-6:os a. in., 7 :5o a.
1o :20 p. Mn.12:20 a. in.
e Farmers & Mechanics Bank
Offers the Best in Modern Banking
SECURITY - - - EFFICIENCY
venient and Pleasant quarters. You Will
Pleased With Our Service. Two Offices
-105 S. Main St. : : 330 S. State St.
YPERITERS of all makes
ale or Rent. oCleaning &
leparing. TYPEWRITIN G &
&IMEOGLAPHING. SUPPLIES
, DMorr 1 1

We Offer You
SECURITY- -SERVICE - - LOCATION

Resources $3,800,000

Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Main Office--
Northwest corner Main and Huron
Branch Office- -
707 North University Ave.
MODERN BABE SHOP
332 state St.

THE CHEER LEADING SITUATION
The alumni have long suspected that
there were rather too many he-Pavlo-
was among the trouser-wearing por-
tion of the student body of today. But
we had not expected that the disciples
of Delsarte would make their appear-
ance upon the athletic field, and we
think they are as much out of place
as cheer leaders as they would be as
athletes. . "Sully" Sullivan, "Whitey"
Otis and Hal Smith swung clenched
fists. We don't recollect that "Bell-
Cow" Murfin indulged in grimaces or
the wiles of the contortionist and the
ballet dancer. President "Sid" Small
asked the Detroit alumni what they
thought of it in a meeting recently, and
they showed their disapproval of
Charley Chaplin cheer leading meth-
ods in no uncertain terms. We hope
we won't be waved at demurely on the
eighteenth.
The above editorial appeared in the
November Michigander, the official
organ of Michigan's Detroit alumni.
We agree with its sentiments, and be-
lieve that the undergraduates are just
as tired of the Charley Chaplin cheer
leading as the alumni.
At the Pennsylvania game a differ-
ent kind of cheer leading will pre-
vail. Michigan students have awaken-
ed to the necessity of replacing the
vaudeville antics with serious fight.
Our cheer leaders realize this, and are
working hard to perfect a system of
organized serious cheering for the
Penn game.
WOMEN'S CONFERENCE SECURES
GOOD SPEAKERS FOR MEETING

HALLER & FU LLER
STATE STREET JEWELERS

kL

A Particular Place
for Particular People.

FRANK 0, BOLCH, Prop..

S. State

582-'4

ANNOUNCEMENT

SAM BURCHFIELD

& CO*

Gives you the best Tailoring service
to be obtained anywhere in the coun-
try, coupled with a wonderful line
of Woolens.

106 E. Huron Street

Opposite Court House

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO.

2 2 Special Tea and Rice Served
PLAIN

HOP SUEY

25'c

nday Special 12-5 - - 6oc
icken meal with soup, celery, olives,
,e bread and hot roast pie, Oolong
, coffee and miik.
ichigan Inn 611 E. Liberty
Telephone 2082
LOF. GINGERICH PRAISES
"Y" WORK AT VESPER SERVICE
"I am heartily in favor of the work
the Christian associations in col-
es," said Prof. S. F. Gingerich yes-
'day afternoon at the Y. W. C. A.
sper service. "They are a fine
ng, and I am glad to be in this
eting because it recalls my own col-
e days, when the Y. M. C. A. meant
ch to me."
3y special request, Professor Ging-
cch repeated at yesterday's meeting
address on "Various Conceptions of
d and Immortality" which he gave
t year before an audience of college
'is. A solo by Miss Alice Lloyd
.sed the services.

Alarm Clocks
ItAYFR $1.00 up
rountain Pens-
$ r" -~ Waterman and Conklin
U. of M. Jewelry
- Schlanderer & Seyfried
T~oment
Woman's staff of The Daily will
meet at 11 o'clock Saturday morning,
in The Daily office.
Board of Directors of the Women's
League will hold a special meeting at
4 o'clock this afternoon, in Barbour
gymnasium.
Schedule for special gymnasium
classes is as follows: Beginning aes-
thetic dancing, 4 o'clock Tuesday aft-
ternoon beginning Nov. 21; advanced
dancing, 4 o'clock Monday afternoon,
beginning Nov. 20; playground work,
4 o'clock, Wednesday afternoon, begin-
ning Nov. 22.
Watch for the grand o.pening of Ann
Arbor's Finest Floral Shop. Nickels
Arcade. ' 3-tf
Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Packard Academy. 18-tf

Arrangements for the women's an-
nual vocational conference, Nov. 23,
24, and 25, are nearly completed. El-
sie Paul, '17, chairman of the commit-
tee for the event, announces the fol-
lowing programs for Thursday and
Friday.
On Thursday afternoon, Miss Sarah
Arnold, Dean of Simmons College, will
be the first speaker. Miss Letitia
Stearns, formerly in the Milwaukee
libraries, will lecture on library work,
and Miss Mary J. Malcolmson, '12,
secretary of the Detroit Collegiate
Bureau of Occupations, will talk about
the placement work of the bureau.
On Friday afternoon the speakers
will be Mrs. Gertrude Shorb Martin,
executive secretary of the Association
of Collegiate Alumnae, formerly ad-
visor to the women of Cornell; Mr.
Talcott Williams, of the Columbia
School of Journalism; and Miss Gert-
rude Gogin, industrial secretary of the
Y. W. C. A. in the central field.
The plans for Saturday will be an-
nounced later.
The delegates and speakers will be
entertained at Martha Cook building
and at Newberry residence.
Unitarian Students Give Dance
Following a banquet at the church
guild, the Unitarian Student society
will give a dance, beginning at 7
o'clock tonight. Several speeches are
on the program.
If its artistic wall paper you want,
go to C. H. Major & Co. Phone 237. 5-16

'Intercollegiate
Wisconsin-Maria Montessori spoke
to the university this week on her new
educational system and what it is ac-
complishing where it is practiced. The
lecture was given entirely in Italian
but made intelligible by an interpreter
to those who did not understand the
language.
Oklahoma:-The university band is
giving a series of all-campus dances
that they may accompany the team
on their trip to Arkansas this fall.
Colorado:-The senior engineers
have adopted the broad-brimmed
Stetson for insignia.
Oberlin:-The colleges of Ohio
have agreed to carry $20,000 of the
$150,000 asked of the Universities of
the United States for the relief of the
prison camps in Europe.
Cincinnati:-The chamber of com-
merce of Cincinnati has made arrange-
ments with the university to cooper-
ate in giving a course of training in
the handling of foreign business. The
need of men educated in this field has
long been felt by big manufacturing
firms and some excellent opportunities
are open to young men .
Yale:-The university has added
8,000 seats to the rim of the bowl to
accommodate the crowds expected at
the Harvard-Yale conflict, making a
seating capacity of 70,000.
Iowa: The Varsity Quartet enter-
tains the crowds between the halves
of the football games with a clever
program.
Illinois :-More than 200 students
have signed a petition favoring the
use of wrist watches. The campaign
to break down the funny paper preju-
dice was started by Siren, the univer-
sity paper.
Ohio:-The university is attempting
to establish a wireless service with the
University of Michigan. The plan in-
cludes an exchange of news between
the daily papers of the two colleges.
Washington:-The university is con-
templating the abolishment of its
matriculation fee.
Oberlin:-Twenty "redheads" have
formed a permanent society to be
known as "The Order of the Golden
Fleece."
Harvard: - To accommodate the
large number of men enrolled in the
military science classes another in-
structor has been employed.
Brown :-Italian ivy has been plant-
ed at the bases of the statues of Mar-
cus Aurelius and Augustus Caesar,
which stand on the campus.
Pennsylvania:-Over 200 students
are planning to make the trip to Mich-
igan November 18. The total cost of

MENORAH EDITOR SPEAKS HOER ERS G S R ENSUINE EAR

SAFETY RAZORS
ALL KINDS,
SHARPENED
Se.. window at
the
QUARRY DRUG CO'Ss
Prescription Store
Cor. State & N. University

New Fall Neckwear, Hats
and Underwear

VARSITY TOGGERY SHOP
1107 So. Univ.

Henry Hurwitz Appears Before
Society Sunday Even-
ing

Henry Hurwitz, of New York, chan-
cellor of the Intercollegiate Menorah
association and editor-in-chief of the
Menorah Journal, will be the speaker
to address the Michigan Menorah so-
ciety at its meeting on Sunday even-
ing, Nov. 12, at 8 o'clock in Newberry
hall. Mr. Hurwitz has chosen as his
subject, "Jewish Problems of the
Day."
Mr. Hurwitz, who is a Harvard
graduate, is one of the founders of the
Menorah movement in this country.
He received his A. B. degree in 1908
and continued there doing graduate
work in the field of international law
for several years after his graduation.
WOMEN'S OCCUPATION BUREAU
OPENS OFFICES IN DETROIT
The Detroit bureau of occupations
has announced its organization and the
opening of offices at 1114 Kresge build-
ing. It will endeavor to place trained
applicants in non-teaching professions
for women. The occupations in which
the bureau will endeavor to place ap-
plicants includes almost all of those
which are commonly open to women,
including journalism and advertising.
NOVEMBER GARGOYLE APPEARS
ON DAY BEFORE PENNSY GAME
Just one week from today the Gar-
goyle will make its November appear-
ance, on the day before the Pennsy
game. An extra large number of
copies will be printed for this edition,
the humor magazine having been all
sold out last month. One of the dou-
ble page drawings which has become
a permanent feature of the magazine
will be included in this number.
Dancing wax in all sized packages.

Jewish

a

Plan to Send Representation to Detroit
to Exemplify Third Degree
for Zion Lodge
Craftsmen, student Masonic organ-
ization, made the following election of
officers: Worshipful master, P. E. Gib-
son, '17P; A. D. Wickett, '17M, senior
warden; L..W. Lisle, '17L, junior war-
den; F. E. Curtis, '20M, secretary; H.
C. Hoyt, '17L, senior deacon; L. L.
Matthews, '19, junior deacon.
The club will confer two degrees
for Fraternity lodge at the Masonic
temple at 7 o'clock Friday night. A
short business meeting will be held.
Next Wednesday a representation
will be sent to Detroit to exemplify a
third degree for the Zion lodge, F.
and A. M., number 1. The team will
go on special cars, leaving the local
Masonic temple at 2 o'clock in the aft-
ernoon and arriving at the Masonic
temple in Detroit at 5 o'clock eastern
standard time.
Details will be arraigned and prep-
arations made at the regular meeting
at 7 o'clock Saturday night at the Ma-
sonic temple. Every member is ex-
pected to be present, for this will be
one of the most important meetings of
the year. Two third degrees will be
conferred at this time, after which a
"minature" banquet will take place.
R. S. Stauffer, ex-'10H, Enters School
Dr. Ralph S. Stauffer, former '16
homeop, and a graduate from the Jef-
ferson medical school in Philadelphia,
has returned to the University to ob-
tain an M. D. degree in homeopathic
medicine. Dr. Stauffer was a student
in the University in '13, '14 and '15,
transferring in the fall of 1915 to the
Jefferson school.
Spot light ball, Packard Academy,
Saturday, Nov. 11, 8:30 to 12:00.. 20
spot light dances, Fischers orchestra.
Tickets at door, $1.00 per couple.
^ -1A^i t

19

i Takes Pictures
1A Develops Films
makes Prints
and Enlarge-
ments.
713 M. Vml-realty

the trip will be $39.50.

C. H. Major & Co. Phone 237.

6-16

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