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November 10, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-10

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THE WEATHER
ANN ARBOR-
OVERCAST AND COLDER
FRIDAY

yllllfR1 ' 1 1/'

UNITED PRESS WIRE
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
TI m ONLY MRNIN G PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

VOL. XXVII No. 34. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1916. PRICE FIVE CEN

FIGHTING MIZE
AND BLUE SQUAD
GETS BIG SENDOFF
AUDITORIUM PACKET) BY 4,000
STUDENTS CHEERING FOR
COME-BACK TEAM
BAND LEADS PARADE TO DEPOT
Ilurphy and Carpell in Speeches Pre-
dict Certain Victory for
Michigan
Four thousand Michigan students
last night gave the fighting football
team a send off unprecedented in the

One- Third of Block "71" Seats
for Penn Game Still Unfilled
We are going to reveal something. When you hear about it you
will probably put it in a class with the other seven wonders. Listen!
Students who have not yet turned in their applications for the
Penn game have an opportunity to obtain seats between the 40 and 50
yard lines in the Michigan cheering sections. This section constitut-
es one-third of the block "M". This part of the stand was originally
reserved for senior students, but a majority of them sent in applica-
tions for seats in the south stand with the visitors and alumni. Con-
sequently most of the fourth year men have passed up choice seats
in the center of the field, and will be fortunate if they get anything
better than 30 yard line seats in the south stand.
Michigan's cheering section should be filled up with loyal support-
ers, who are willing to go to the game and shout their lungs out
unaccompanied by mother, father, sister of friend. If you come un-
der this classification, and have not sent in your application, start ne-
gotiations immediately with the athletic association to get one of
these choice seats.

DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE RETAINiS OFFICEFOLLOING
STIRRING RACE IN WHICH HUGHES AT IRSlu'TAp PEARED
WINNER DUE TO1 EARLY HEAVY V130" THROUGHO ' 8UT EAST

history of the University. With the
band out in full'force, with every stu-
dent voicing his confidence and en- BULANCE FILDUWORK
thusiasm at the top of his voice, Ann
Arbor witnessed one of the most im-
pressive scenes in years.
The "pep" test held in Hill auditor-
ium at least equalled, if not excelled Ernest Stanton Talks on Americans
in spirit the famous "come-back" mass in the European War;
meeting held in the fall of 1915. Hill
auditorium had very few empty seats Films Shown
when the team filed in to the accom-
paniment of the yells of the coatless, Students of the University will have
cheering students. an opportunity tonight to hear Mr.
Staats M. Abrams, '17E, presided at Ernest Stanton of the American am-
the meeting, and first introduced Otto bulance field service deliver a lecture
Carpell, '11-'14L, famed as a half back in the natural science auditorium on
on several winning Yost elevens. He "Our American Boys in the European
voiced the confidence and sentiment of War," and of seeing moving pictures
the entire student body when he said taken on the western front. Mr. Stan-
to the team: "Every Michigan student ton has been with the American am-
and every Michigan man and the bluance corps for over a year.
alumni throughout the whole world, Cercle Francais, which brings the
are tonight sending every ounce, every pictures to Ann Arbor, assures the
pound, yes, it even measures into tons, public that they are the best of their
of that old-time Michigan 'pep' and kind shown in this country. All the
Michigan fight, to the team that is go- receipts will be given to the American
ing to go down to Ithaca, and plow ambulance field service, which oper-
through that big team and bring home ates 120 ambulances in France.
the victory." The Triangle film, "Our American
Frank Murphy, '12-16L, who fully Boys," has a two fold interest: It
lived up to his reputation of being the depicts the stirring scenes of the con-
"verbal tornado" of Michigan, in his flict itself and shows clearly our con-
speech voiced the same confidence in tribution to the great war. The men
the team's victory, and gained the are seen dashing to the front from
mos. unstinted approval of the entire base hospitals, carrying the wounded
gathering when he said, speaking di- out of the fighting zone, and picking
rectly to the captain of the team: their way through a village which the
"Johnny Maulbetsch, I don't know enemy is bombarding. A French gen-
whether Walter Camp is going to put eral is shown thanking the men in-
you on that All-American team or not, dividually.
but believe me when I say that there The automobiles themselves tell the
are hundreds, yes thousands, of Michi- service the boys have seen. Most of
gan men everywhere who wogldn't them are minus lamps, mudguards are
trade you for any other football star torn away, and bullet holes appear in
who walks in shoe leather." the hoods and bodies. In one scene
elides of every member of the squad French soldiers are reproducing a per-
and the coaches and trainer were formance of "Carmen" while German

DETROIT ALUMNI PLAN
TO HOLDBIG SMOKER1
Arrange Varied Bill of Entertainment,
Songs, Speeches, and Movies to
Speed Golden Minutes
Every play of the game tomorrow
will be shown on a large score board
at the Cornell-Michigan football
a
smoker which will begin at the Board
of Commerce at Detroit at 2 o'clock.
The University of Michigan club of
Detroit is giving the smoker.
All undergraduates of the University
are invited to attend the affair and
tickets, are now on sale at Huston
Bros. at $1.00 each. Alumni from both
the University and Cornell will be on
hand and a huge crowd seems sure.
A varied bill of entertainment has
been arranged for the occasion and
not a single dull moment will intrude.
There will be plenty of eat and drink,
and speeches, songs, and movies will
be included to speed the golden min-
utes. Old time cheer leaders and a
quartet that knows every Michigan
song as well as the popular hits of the
day will be on hand. The alumni of
Detroit are anxious to swell the at-
tendance by having every student who
can come to Detroit appear at the
Board of Commerce. This is an ex-
ceptional opportunity to become ac-
quainted with the Detroit branch of
the University of Michigan club who
are known all over the country as
live wires.

Woodrow Wilson
Thomas Woodrow Wilson, who Tues-
day was re-elected to the presi-
idency of the United States, was born
of Scotch-Irish parentage in the little
city of Staunton, Va., Dec. 28, 1856,
being the son of Rev. Joseph R. and
Jessie Wilson. His father was a min-
ister in the Methodist church and
Woodrow's early training was acquir-
ed in the clergical and religious at-
mosphere of the ministerial house-
hold.
is early education was left al-
most entirely in the hands of his par-
ents, and for some unaccountable rea-
son, he did not learn his alphabet un-
til he was nine years old. After once
starting to school, however, he proved
so adaptable to the world of books
that he was graduated from the pre-
paratory school at the age of 17.
In the autumn of 1873 he matricu-
lated at Davidson College, a staunch
Methodist institution in the famous
Mecklenburg county in North Carolina.
Ile remained there for only a year, for
he felt himself too limited in the cir-
cumscribed routine of the little school.
Wilson Enters Princeton
Princeton College next claimed him
as a student, and he matriculated
there in 1875, a member of a class of
134.
The autumn of 1879 found him
studying law in the University of Vir-
ginia. In 1882, he started law practice
in Atlanta, but the cases that he might
have won never came his way and he
failed. In 1885 he was married to
Ellen Louise Axson, and in 1886 he
took his Ph. D. degree at Johns Hop-
kins. After serving as professor of
the chair of jurisprudence and politics
at Princeton for 12 years, he became
the president of that institution in
1902.
Made Governor of New Jersey
On Nov. 8, 1910, he was elected to
the governorship of New Jersey by a
plurality of 49,150, and he held the of-
fice until Mar. 1, 1913, when he re-
signed. In the meantime he had been
nominated for the presidency of the
United States by the Democratic con-
vention at Baltimore. On Nov. 4, 1912,
he was elected to the presidency, hav-
ing secured a total of 435 votes in the
electoral college as against 88 for
Roosevelt, the Progressive nominee,
and 8 for Taft, the Republican candi-

MIDN,I1 T FLASH BRINGS STORY OF NEW TERSEYA'NS VICTORY
AFTER TWO DAYS OF UNCET'AiNTY; RESULT
PREDICTED1 YE STE RDI)AY A FTEINOON
CALIFORNIA TURNS THE TIDE IN FAVOR OF THE EXEUTIV
German Editorials Express Vivid Opinions C itwerniug Early Reuter Dis-
patches Announcing Success for rughes; orgen Post States
Washington Officially Anounced Republican Victory
Chicago, Nov. 10.-Woodrow Wilson h been re-elected president of
the United States.
By carrying California after a lDng contest the 1emocratic candidate
took enough electoral votes to give him four more years as chief execu-
tive of the country. During Thursdiy the contest remained uncertain
with the constantly varying reports of te doubtful states first threaten-
ing Wilson, then asserting his re-election.
As early as Wednesday afternoon papers beg'an printing extras an-
nouncing Wilson's victory. The New Yrk Evening Mail, a strong Re-
publican paper, declared for Wilson, giving him 269 votes.
In the evening a variety of reporis kept f lie supporters of both can-
didates in flurries of excitement. Ahot idmight, however, the news that
Wi'son was victorious was flashed oer th country.

PRINCE H ENRY'S DEA TH SUR E
Bulgarians Reported in Retreat Along
Whole Dobrudja Front
Iucharest, Nov. 9.- -Roumnanlan
forces have re-occvpied the bord-
er ton vkof Haarsova.
Berlin, Nov. 9.- Confirmation of the
reported death on the battlefield of
Prince Henry of Bavaria, has been re-
ceived at the war office. Prince Henry
who was a major in the King's Own
infantry regiment, was the nephew
of the Bavarian king Louis. His death
resulted from wounds received during
a reconnoitering expedition on Tues-
day last. The dead prince was 32
years old and a batchelor. Prince
Henry's mother left for the battle-
field today to take charge of his re-
mains.
Paris, Nov. 9.-A Gernan aInfantry
rush on the French forces at Saillisel
on the Somme front last night was
broken up after sharp hand-to-hand
fighting. Artillery action was contin-
uous and heavy through the night.
The Germans betrayed nervousness in
their curtain fire.
London, Nov. 9.-The Bulgarians are
retiring along the whole Dobrudja
front. The retreating forces are burn-
ing the villages through which they
are falling back.
Paris, Nov. 9.--inist. of Finance
Ribot announced in t chamber of
deputies today that $_,'70,000,000 had
been subscribed to the last loan. Of

By PERRY ARNOLD
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
New York, Nov. 9.-The tide for
\Wilson set in so strongly in California
and Minnesota this afternoon that it
appeared probable at 3:45 o'clock that
returns from these two states would
indicate the president's re-election.
The belief that the Wilson drift would
re sult in his choice was based on these
developments:
Hughes must carry both Minnesota
and California to win. Wilson's lead
in California is steadily maintained.
hughes' lead of 811 in Minnesota has
not increased despite addition of a
number of supposedly strong Hughes
precincts relied upon by Republicans
to greatly swell his total.
The precise drift in these states and
in the other smaller doubtful states of
New Hampshire and New Mexico
showed on United Press returns avail-
able at 5 o'clock:
California, 5,705 out of 5,867 pre-
cincts, Wilson leading by 4,559 vot6s ;
to come, 175 precincts.
New Hampshire, 248 out of 294 pre-
cinets, Hughes leading by 279.
Democrats prepared back-up claims
of carrying the state by court action.
Minnesota, 2,884 out of 3,024 pre-
cincts, Hughes leading by 450.
New Mexico, 336 out of 638 precincts,
Hughes leading by 258.
If Carl W. Ackerman
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Berlin, Nov. 9.--Realizing the bear-
ing of the election in the United States

thrown on the screen, and cheers for'
all were led by Bob Bennett, '18. The
playing of "The Yellow and Blue"
ended the mass meeting and the band
filed out to lead the procession that,
formed on North University. A motor
truck decorated with maize and blue
directly followed the band and car-
ried the entire team. After this came
thousands of students, and the proces-
sion slowly went to the station past
rows of red fire torches that marked
the entire way.
A half hour's wait on the platform
was enlivened by speeches from Doug-
lass, Pontius, and Tuthill, each firmly
confident in the victory of the team.
Bob Bennett again led cheers for the
(Continued on Page Six.)

shells kick up dust in a nearby yard.
No .one can afford to miss "Our
American Boys" or Mr. Stanton's lec-
ture. Tickets may be secured at
Wahr's book store for twenty-five cents
apiece.
No Cause for Action in Huston Case
The case of Marvin Ickes, John Sher-
man, and Frank Smith, who were al-
leged to have held up John Huston last
Sunday and taken $220 from him, was
quashed in Justice William G. Doty's
court yesterday. Smith, who was ar-
rested Monday morning, had no im-
plication in the affair, which seems to
have been in the nature of a quarrel,
according to a statement made by his
mother yesterday.

* * * * * * * * * * * *
The Sunday edition of The
Michigan Daily will contain a
play-by-play account of the
Michigan-Cornell game, complete
from whistle to whistle. A re-
porter on the staff of the paper
has already left for Ithaca,
where he will send a complete
resume of the big intersectional
contest just as it happened.
Other details of just howf it all
happened will appear in the
same edition, showing the why-
if such is not the case-the why
not on the Wolverine side of the
struggle.
* * * * * * * * * * * *

*1

* a
*
%Y y
E~
* *k

Ate.

* * * * * * * * * *1 * * * 4
Note to Mihigan Daily Sub- *
soribers: *
All local subscriptions to The *
IMichigan daily must be paid *
today, Friday, Nov. 10, or the *
$300 rate will be charged. *
Checks may be mailed or de- *
livered in person to The Michi- *
gan Daily offices, Press building, *
Maynard street.
Any supscriptions not laid by
Nov. 15, will be cut on that date,
and a charge will be made for *
the time that the subscription *j
has run, *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

this more than 50 .per cent is new on the European war, the report of
money. ex-Governor Hughes' election by Reu-
ter's here brought out many pro-
Catholic Smoker to Be Held Tonight nounce d opinions in the newspapers.
The Catholic Students club of the "The Republican victory must be as-
University will entertain the Catholic cribed," said Vorwaerts, "first to a
men attending the University at a united party, and secondly to the Ger-
smoker to be held at 8 o'clock this mn and Irish-American tactics em-
evening at the St. Thomas hall. ployed. Since 1861 there have been
Former Congressman Weadock, '73L, only two Democratic presidents, Cleve-
of Detroit will act as the principal land amid Wilson. Those were the only
speaker, while F. D. Devine, city at- American presidents in that time t
torney of Ann Arbor, will be called threaten America with a European
on for a short talk. (Continued on Page Six.)

____________________________ U U

SEAT

SALE

FOR

Hil

Hindu Poet

T

A

C

0

R

E

and

Wednesday
November, 11

i

Mystic

Begins. Today At Wahr's, 2-5

P. M.

RESERVED $1.00, 75c, 500.;

-

-0

GENERAL ADMiSSION 25o.

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