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November 04, 1916 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


. ..

wanese Women augh tvirtue of
Obedience from Early Childhood
Ideals of Womanhood Preeminently Domestic, Says Mitsuji Kiyohare,
'17, Student from Orle nt, in Article Dealing
With His Native Land

ANNUAL CHESS TOURNAMENT TO PLAY TO A SCORELESS TIE
OPERATE UNDER NEW SYSTEM --
---. (Continued from page three)
Playing in the annual chess tourna- terday afternoon resulted in a score-
ment held by the members of the Uni- less tie.
versity of Michigan Chess club will be- The teams were quite evenly
matched, the freshmen having a lit-
gin tomorrow night in room 173, na- tle the advantage during the first
tural science building. This year a three quarters. In the fourth quarter

(This is the fourth of a series of
articles by foreign students about
some phase of their native lands. It
is contributed today by Mitsuji Kiyo-
hare, '17, of Hyogo-ken, Japan.)
Unlike the women of America, the
women of Japan have been taught
from their earliest childhood the vir-
tue of obedience.
"As daughters," the moral code
runs, "be obedient to your fathers, and
as wives to your husbands." They
are trained at home and in school to
become good wives and wise mothers.
The Japanese ideals of womanhood

Equal to the men, in their position they
could not ma4ntain it.
At the present the intelligent class'
of Japanese women is establishing a
higher standard for themselves, show-
ing the world that they are capable
of doing more than domestic duties.
All social and foreign questions are
as yet settled with but little influence
from the women. There are many
problems facing them and they find
themselves utterly helpless to meet
these issues.
It is not because Japanese men are
too lazy to do their own courting that
their parents arrange marriages for
them and their daughters, but this is
an over-emphasis of the Japanese fam-
ily in keeping its lineage pure.
All existing conditions will be re-
formed in the future. The oppor-
tunity of education in private colleges
and universities has been opened to
women and even in some of the im-
perial universities. The Northeastern
Imperial University gave the degree
of master of science to two women last
year and now there is a tendency to-
ward co-education in all institutions
of learning in our land.

new system will be-put into operation
and instead of holding a tournament
in which every player is supposed to
start out on even terms with every
other tournament, the players will be
divided into three classes, and the
higher classes will be handicapped by
the loss of several pieces in the play
with the lower class.
Plans have been made to hold a mail
tournament with Cornell this year and
arrangements are being made to play
by wireless with one of the other uni-
versities.
Ann Arbor's progressive merchants
use the Michigan Daily as their adver-
tising medium.

through the efforts of Walker and
Given, the sophomores threatened to
score, but lost the ball on the fresh-
man 15-yard line, three minutes be-
fore the whistle.
Kane was the individual star of the
game, gaining most of the ground for
the freshmen and playing a good game
on defense. Kerr in the backfield also
worked well for the yearlings. Walker
and Davis were the sophomore ground
gainers while Fonner played a good
game on the line.
Alarm clocks, $1.00 up. Chapman,
Jeweler, 113 South Main St. tues-eod
For results advertise in The Michi-
gan Daily.

I,

SOPH ENGINEERS DEFEAT
FRESH IN GRID CONTEST
The ability of Parr, the diminutive
left half of the soph engineers, to hurl
the pigskin into the waiting arms of
Quarterback Jeager of the same ag-
gregation spelled defeat for the fresh
engineers by the score of 6 to 0.
Both teams showed a superior brand
of football to any displayed by class
teams to date. The sophs threatened
the fresh goal several times through-
out the game, but each time the fresh
strengthened and held for downs. The
-only score of the game came when
Parr threw a long pass to Jeager, who
was downed on the 2-yard mark.
Jeager himself took the ball over on
the next play. The defensive play of
Nynan was the feature of the sophs'
play. Time and again he would break
through and grab the fresh quater-
back before he could get rid of the
ball. Howsen was the most consist-
ant ground gainer for the fresh.
Read The Daily advertisements.

(Continued from page three)
That is the east's only big game.
All the rest of the important schools
of this section will be taking on op-
ponents who should -prove compara-
tively easy. Dartmouth alone has a
hard job on her hands, and there is
everything to indicate another dent
will be put in the Green's chances
when it is catapulted against the
heavy Syracuse footballists. The game
will be played at Springfield.
Princeton will have Bucknell for
practice, Harvard will battle Virginia,
and Yale will take on Colgate, not a
practice game by any means, but one
which should be won by Yale. Cor-
nell will get Carnegie Tech, the team
which was battered by Yale.

ARMY

therefore are preeminently domestic.
The rapidly changing conditions in
Japan seem to have stimulated our
women toward bettering their condi-
tions. Many "movements for women"
hiave been started, but on the whole
these movements have met with pub-
lic contempt. The reason for this
mainly is that the education of women
las been so different from that of
nen that, though they would have re-
ceived the full recognition as being

l!

iii _-_.

L

C . . . _

I

I

ITRA PROSPECTS GOO

University Symphony Organization
Offers Beneficial Work
The University Symphony orches-
tra, which is beginning its tenth year
under the directorship of Samuel Pier-
son Lockwood, has prospects of an un-
usually successful season, according
to a recent statement by Mr. Lock-
wood.
This organization consists of about
50 members and makes four public ap-
pearances each year. An unusual sup-
ply of local material, an enthusiastic
co-operation of conductor and mem-
bers, and very strict rules as to at-.
tendance combine to achieve results
that are ordinarily far beyond the
reach of amateur, or even semi-pro-
fessional, orchestras.
The following number of composi-
tions, which have been performed in
the last nine years, will give some idea
of the scope of the work undertaken
by this orchestra: 15 symphonies, 15t
overtures, accompaniments to 25 con-
certos and 23 other compositions, 11t
pieces for strings, and 26 miscellan-
eous pieces.
Work in this orchestra is not only
beneficial from a technical viewpoint,1
but it also makes one familiar with1
many of the best compositions which
:he literature of orchestral music af- i

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x
x:
*:
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* * * 33 * * *'# * I *
AT THE THEATERS
TODAY
Majestic-Vaudeville.
Orpheuum -- William Desmond
and Enid Markey in "Lieuten-.
ant Danny, U. S. A." Also
Triangle Comedy, Ford Ster-
ling in "His Lying Heart."
Arcade-Edith Storey in "The
Christian."

*
*
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*
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*

IC J K

14 f

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THEi
R~OYAL
TAILQIRS

"SOME BABY"
"Some Baby" which comes to the
Whitney theater Thursday, Nov. 9, is
made for laughing purposes only. The
stage bids for response from different
emotions. There are romances that
seek out temperament, tragedies that
find a response in dramatic instinct,
but dearer to the hearts of all is the
farcial comedy that cheers and rouses
the humor in us. "Some Baby" is a
typical plaX of the latter kind. Never
mind its story. Do not get worked
up over its plot. Just imbue yourself
with. the idea that it's a laugh pro-
ducer, a destroyer of worries and
cares, and you will be fully prepared
for a jolly, mirthful two hours within
the glare of the footlights.
The company that will interpret the.
several parts of this play is said to
be of exceptional merit, with Grace
Merritt, who reached stellar honors in
"When Knighthood Was in Flower"
and "The Blue Mouse" at the head.

JHEN

we chose the

f T

incomparable line of

tailored- to -order clothes

' we

now feature,

we

selected that of

""b
17

O

4 Tapng the
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ask our
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into our clothes.
We MAKE the
clothes to fit their
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Every Royal Tai
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Our tape Ine is ready
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To your order at
$18.50 to $40 per suit
or overcoat.

4

>rds.
Freshmen as well as upperclassmen
re eligible to participate in this work.
ehearsals are held each Sunday aft-
rnoon in the auditorium of the School
Music and are open to anyone who
axes to attend.
orduroys for Engineers Arrive Today
Some of the corduroys for the senior
ngixieers will be here today, accord-
.g to one of the members of the com-
ittee. The large present demand has
ken all of the material of this kind
tat is on hand and there may be a
ight delay in getting the rest of the
der. When all of the boys are in
adiness to make their first appear-
ice on the campus the committee
Ill set a date for the official "comingl
"+ 1

AT THE ARCADE
On account of numerous requests
that Hall Caine's great picture, "The
Christian," be shown again in -Ann
Arbor, it will be given a return date
at the Arcade today. It is a splendid
picture starring Edith Storey and
Earle Williams. Those who have al-
ready seen this exceptionally fine pro-
duction have expressed a desire to see
it again, and those who have not
should take advantage of this oppor-
tunity. It is an eight part feature.
On next Monday and Tuesday the
Arcade offers "The Fall of a Nation."
This is one of Thomas Dixon's pro-
ductions, who wrote "The Birth of a
Nation." Special music for this pic-
ture will be furnished by an orchestra
under the direction of Ike Fischer.

I Y 1 ,y w
44 .
CO PYR 3'IaT BY~
ED . PFCBaCo.-

not because it would
bring us the most profit,
but because it would sat-
isfy our customers best.
Call and convince yourself

FOR SALE BY

FOR SALE BY

Campus. Bootry
State St.
-Authorized Dealer
for

309 So.
Main St.

F. W. GROSS

814 So.
State St.,

ocal Dealerof Ed. V. Price & Co.

Merchant Tailors, Chicago

_._ -~

uI

.I

Mayor Gill of Seattle, Washington
Converted To Prohibition by Experience
Seattle Under Prohibition
Business more prosperous than in ten years.
Bank deposits increased about $1,000,000 per month.
Crime decreased 100 percent.
"I voted 'wet' but was mistaken."

sir/ #

THESE ARE THE WORDS OF MAYOR GILL
Read his telegram, sent to Grant Hudson October 7,1916
"Our anti-saloon law injured only the saloon business; every other business more prosperous than it has been in ten
years; bank deposits increased about one million dollars per month since January first; building permits double those of
last year, and practically no vacancies in either business or residence property; crime decreased at least 100 percent.
I voted 'wet' but was mistaken." H. C. GILL, Mayor.
Prohibition now brings to 19 states and many cities-Business Prosperity, Increased
Savings, and a Decrease of Crime.
Michigan has a right to these benefits, vote on Both Amendments having to do with the
Liquor Traffic-

"YES" on Amendment to Art. XVI.

"NO" on Amendment to Art. VIIL

NE FROM "SOME BABY", TO APPEAR AT THE WHITNEY THEATER
NEXT TH URSDAY

[1 Washtenaw .Dry Campaign Committee
i9

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