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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 02, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

T

s

G. H. Wild Co.
Leading Merchant Tailors
State St.

GRAF

STUDEr
WH
ALLMENDIN
rone 1692

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A NOLAS
FOR
NT'S ROOMS
12.50
KY PAY MORE?
GER MUSIC SHOP
122 B. Liberty St.:
lIltlrlt lillirl i ti1111111111111llil ll" i

BVY YOVR

LA V N D RY

CAS E

A T

*Slater Book Shop *tat.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
tween Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
rs run on Eastern time, one hour faster
local time.
etroit Limited and Express Cars--8 : so a.
tnd hourly to 7:10 p. i., 9:10 p. Mn.
alamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. m. and
y two hours to 6:48 p. M.; to Lansing,
( m.
c son Express Gart--( Local stops west of
Arbor)-:48 a.r in.and every two hours
48 p.m.
ecal ECars astbound-s:3 a. in, 6:40 a.
7:o a. n. and every two hours to 7:05 p.
8:05 p. nM., 9:05 p. in., 1o:50 p. m. to
lanti only. 9:o a. m., 9:50 a. m., 2:05 p.
6:o5 p. m., 11:45 p. M., 1:ro a. m., :2o
1.To Saline, -change at Ypsilanti.\
ocal Cars Wostbound-6:o5 a. n., 7:so a.
ro:2o p. m.. 12:20 a. m.

We Offer You
SECURITY - - SERVICE - - LOCATION
Resources $3,800,000
Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Main Office--
Northwest Corner Main and Huron
Branch Office--
707 North University Ave.

Official newspaper at the University of
Michigan. Pubshed every morning except
Monday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
"econd-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier, $.0; by mail, $3.00.
Want ad. stations: Quarry's; Students' Sup-
ply Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub -
lished in The Daily if left at the office in the
Ann Arbor Press Bldg., or in the notice box
in the west corridor of the general library,
where the notices are collected at 7 :30 o'cloc
each evening.
John C. B. Parker.........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh.. Bsiness Manager
Conrad N. Church..............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn...................City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald..........Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor
Verne E. Burnett...........Associate Editor
Golda Ginsburg............. Women's Editor
Carleton XW. Reade........Statistical Editor
J. E. Cam p s....Assistant Business Manager
C. Phili Emery..Assistant Business Manager
Albert B. Horne..Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau....Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter....Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
L. S. Thompson E. A. Baumgarth
L. W. Nieter J. L. Stadeker
Reporters
B. A. Swaney C. W. Neumann
W. R. Atlas C. C. Andrews
E. L. Zeigler H. C. Garrison
Allen Schoenfield C. M. ickling
Marian Wilson D. S Rood
Business Staff
Bernard Wohl t . . Robinson
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Louis
E. Reed Hunt Harold J. Lance
Earl F. Ganschow Walter R. Payne
Harold Makinson
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1916.
Night Editor-Harry M. Carey.
DEMOCRACY IN ATHLETICS
Yes, Captain Carroll was first.
Michigan's snowing against Syra-
cuse in the recent cross country meet
serves to emphasize a long standing
truism. A Michigan runner won.
Syracuse runners were second, third,
fourth and fifth. Thus a Michigan man
won the race, but Syracuse won the
meet. The honors therefore went to
Syracuse.
The Maize and Blue usually possess-
es a handful of real stars but she often
lacks the second, third, fourth and
fifth place men. These second, third,
fourth, and fifth place men are the ones
that count. Consult the records, if you
doubt this. Cornell's championship
track team of 1914 took just one first
place in the intercollegiate s. Forty of
her 45 points were contributed by sec-
ond, third, fourth and fifth place men.
These men won the meet. Stars can
not win unsupported.
The cross country team needs more
material. In order to absolve Michi-
gan from the accusation of having an
aristocracy and not a democracy of
athletes, a bigger number of men
should heed the calls of the managers.
Michigan needs and needs badly these
second, third, fourth and fifth place
third, fourth and fifth place men.
Vanderbilt: The freshmen have taken
measures to perpetuate the green
"frosh" hat that has been suggested
several times and very soon every
'20 man will appear in a gold let-
tered head piece.
Wisconsin: Madison is troubled neith-
er with typhoid nor smallpox, but
with overcoat thieves, and the re-
sult is uncomfortable if not so dan-
gerous.

Farmers & Mechanics Bank
Offers the Best in Modern Banking
SECURITY - - - EFFICIENCY
enient and Pleasant Quarters. You Will
eased with Our service. Two Offices
105 S. Main St. : : 330 S. State St.
(PMWRITERS of all makes1
le or Rent. Cleaning &
epairing. TYPEWRITING &
WEOGRAPHING. SUPPLIES
O D M o'rr i11
22 S. State582-4

Go to Church
Sunday
November 5

MWA

GIRLSI buy tickets at Beauty Shop and
save $1.50 on, $5.00. Souvenir with
every Soc purchase of cosmetics.
Miss Mable Rowe
503 First National Bank Bldg. Phone 2402
FIRST NATL BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Capital $100,000 Surplus and Profit $65,000
DIRECTORS
Wirt Cornwell Waldo M. Abbott
Geo. W. Patterson Harry M. Hawley
S. W. Clarkson Harrison Soule
Fred Schmid D. B. Sutton
E. D. Kinnie

SCORES PEANUT POLITICS
SENIOR LAW SAYS EXISTENCE IS
DUE PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES
WHO HOG OFFICES.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
"Peanut Politics" was the subject of
an editorial in Tuesday's Daily, in
which the senior law class was held
up as a glowing example of political
rottenness. As a member of this class,
I wish to join the Daily editor in de-
ploring the condition which exists, not
only in my class, but in practically
every other organization upon the
Michigan campus; and to explain, if I
can, why this condition prevails.
The existence of "peanut politics" in
class elections is, in my opinion, due
primarily to the tendency of certain
professional fraternal organizations to
"hog" all the offices to which any of
their members may be eligible. I am
not against the fraternity spirit at all.
I believe it is a fine thing in itself. I
can see how it naturally leads to clan-
nishness, and a desire that its members
be given places of distinction in camp-
us life. The brotherly feeling is good;
but when it takes the form of domina-
tion of the majority by the minority,
because of the superior organization
of that minority, it becomes a menace
to the spirit of democracy, which the-
oretically pervades Michigan atmos-
phere; and shouldsnot be tolerated by
any man or woman interested in the
future of Michigan.
It is a matter of common knowledge
in my class, I believe, that it has al-
ways been dominated by the fraternity
steam-roller. Independents have de-
plored the condition, but have never
made a concerted effort to stop the
thing until the election this year,
which has been set aside-as to the vote
on the nominees for president, only,
which resulted in a tie-because it
was shown that that vulture, "peanut
politics," had reared its head again.
Why the whole election should not
have been annulled, as there is little
doubt that the odor of "peanuts"
permeated every part of it, if it existed
anywhere, is explained by the fact
that the student council has the pow-
er to set aside an election in part or
as to the whole. If the student coun-
cil possesses this power, the writer
for one, should like to see it exercised

TO KEEP AW. AKE
READ
The World for Sale, $1.35.
Gilbert Parker.
Tish, $1.50.-
Mary Roberts Rinehart.
What Is Coming, $1.50.
N. G. Wells.
W A
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORES
~IItll1llllll 11 llllllll 1111111 |11111 ||111 I li1111i l lll ll l iiilii ll lll1111 I
MART Alecs may be all right but
or a good, honest workin' partner
® give me a man that's got his learnin' 1
slowly an' naturally.
VELVET gets its good-
ness that way-two years
natural ageing.
I Home Made Candies _
Strictly fresh and of the best quality. Pure cream walnut caramels, as-
sorted nut chocolates in ilb. boxes, c. Bitter sweet and chocolate creams
all fresh. Special ice cream sundaes.
THE FOUNTAIN of YOU-T I
State St. Cor. Libeity
=.15 - t- --sllil lllltU
- g a = =5 = = m a - a
111 HII Ia!
RI 11
AA I LA ND ERS I~~l
21 .LOW ERS
Another Liberty St. Phone 294
oAher reminder not to forget us when in need of Flowers for anya
m u marn oted, Violets, Sweet Peas, Orchids, Carnations, Chrysan-
SCorsage Work a Specialty.
El Member Florist Telegraph Dd~ivery Sergice.
e-lu- - - - ------ - - - - - -1- n_
== a- u--

GE ORGE BISCHIOFF
FLOR ST
aoice Cut Flowess and Plants
I Ch Apin St. Ann Arbor, Mich.
PHONE 809 M
STOP AT
TUTTLE'S
33 S. STATE
for sodas and lunches,

After the Show stop at
SUGAR BOWL
109 S. Main St.
We make our own Candies and
Ice Cream in our Sanitary Shop

I

more frequently, and to its fullest ex-
tent.
Unless the organized faction which
has been "carrying away the bacon"
In class elections will, of itself, decide
to play fair, and refuse to indulge in
petty politics, the unorganized mass
must rise and insist upon their right
to be"heard. To be successful, they,
too, must organize to some extent; but
the moment that this is done, the
steam-roller people sprout wings and
point horrified index fingers at the
new movement, raising the cry of
"peanut politics." What solution is
there for this problem? I see none,

RICHARD

Le GALLIENW

TONIG HT.

I

I

Wlomen

-I

ness are to be excused by the health
gervice.
Junior advisors pay 50 cent tax to
Miss Gerlach, or to Mildred Harring-
ton, '18.

All women's league pledges must be
aid this week, either to Miss Gerlach,
r to Marie Macauley, '18.
Freshman hockey team will be chos-
n at practice at 4 o'clock today.
Miss Leslie Blanchard will speak at
espers, at 5 o'clock, today, at New-
erry hall. -Mrs. Burril Fox Bacher,
f the School of Music, will sing.
iris are requested to be in their
laces a few minutes before 5 o'clock.
Geneva club will meet at 7:30 o'clock
Us, evening, at the Delta Gamma
ouse. Miss Blanchard will speak.
Stylus will not meet this week, but
ill meet Tuesday, Nov. 7. Place of
.eeting will be announced later.
Omega Phi will meet at 4 o'clock, to-
ay, at the Alpha Phi house.
Freshmen pay freshman spread tax
$1.00, to Olive Wiggins, '19, to house
presentatives, or to Miss Gerlach.
Women's attendance committee
eets from 11 to 12:15 o'clock, Mon-
y and Thursday, in the registrar's]
lice. All absences must be reported
thin two weeks. Absences due to ill-

I1ntercollegiate

Dartmouth: A free tutoring bureau
has been formed by the Y. M. C. A.
and not only are courses reviewed
but "how to study" is always under
consideration.
Columbia: Loyal followers of the Wil-
son club women as well as men
traveled to Shadow Lawn early this
week to hear the president discuss
campaign issues.
Harvard: Systematic one-hour re-
views are offered about twice a
semester to students desiring to get
a course more clearly outlined.
Pennsylvania: Enrollment in a mili-
tary training batallion numbers 405
and is quite an innovation for each
department tries, to have the biggest
representation.
Iowa: The city editor of the Daily
Iowan has just been sent home on
account of over work.

\ .i
\1 d
ell /
p
III
r
'I

We specialize in
ready overcoats made to our
specifications by one ofthe best
manufacturers in the country-
located at 79 Fifth Avenue,
New York City.
Wagner & Co.
State Street-At head of Liberty St.
Established 1848

1 Takes Pictures
Develops Films
Nmakes Prints
and Enlarge-
'Z13 E. vanivsrsity
unless it comes with the gradual real-
ization-which has appeared in our
national political life, as evidenced by
the Progressive and Women's move-
ments-that the rule of privilege and
faction must be overthrown unless we
wish to lose our place as a representa-
tive democratic government.
I have no quarrel with the profess-
ional fraternity man as such. How-
ever, it has seemed to me that the
fraternities are largely at fault in this
matter. I do not oppose any appear-
ance of "peanuts" in politics, whether
it emanates from the fraternity man
or independent; but I fail to see any
way of stopping it unless all unite in
denouncing it; and, what is far more
important, practicing what they
preach.
SENIOR LAW.
Dr. Alanthey, '14, Dental Grad., Marries
Dr. Oscar Manthey, '14, graduate
from the dental college and practising
in Detroit, recently married Miss Hilda
Newhoff, formerly of Ann Arbor, at
Thousand Isles, Canada. Miss New
hoff is a graduate of the Pratt Insti-
tute and has been engaged in work in
France and Italy.
Red Cross Christmas Seals Received
Nine million red cross Christmas
seals have been received by Miss Carol
Walton, state secretary of the anti-
tuberculosis association, for distribu-
tion in this state. They will be sent
out to the different anti-tuberculosis
societies scattered around the state.
It is expected that more than a third
of them will be sold.
Ann Arbor's progressive merchants
use the Michigan Daily as their adver-
tising medium.
BOXING.
Private lessons. Work will start im-
mediately. See instructor at Dr. May's
office, Waterman gymnasium, for
terms, etc. 0. S. Westerman. tf.

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