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November 02, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-02

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- THE WEATHER
ANN ARBOR-
THURSDAY
FAIR

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IGAN DAII

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VOL. XXVII. No. 27.' ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1916. PRICE FIVE CENTS

BRITISH TROPOPS 1 S OF TH M
DEFEAT BUGARS
DERLIN REPORTS REPULSE OF
ENGLISH NORTH OF
SOMNE
ENTER ROUMANIA 12 MILES

London Reports Capture
to Northeast
Festubert

of Trenches
of

London, Nov. 1.-British troops have
defeated the Bulgarians in several en-
gagements east of the River Struma,
capturing the Macedonian towns of
Barakli-Bjuma, Prosenik and Kumli.
Three hundred prisoners were taken
at Barakli-Bjuma, which was captured
after a bombardment by what was of-
ficially termed a "smart attack." The
town had been strongly fortified by the
Bulgarians. On the Cerna front, the
Serbs repulsed German-Bulgarian
counter-attacks. There was intermit-
tent bombarding in the region of Lake
Doiran and on the Vardar front.
Berlin, via Wireless to Sayvllle, Nov.
1.-Repulse of English attempts north
of the Somme were announced by the
war office today: "The English ad-
vanced from the district of Courcelette
with strong forces for an attack.
. 'North of Courceltte the attack was
unable to advance because of our de-
fensive fire. West of Le Transloy a
drive broke down under losses, in some
places in hand-to-hand fighting.
"In the eastern . war theater, on
Prince Leopold's front the Russians.
after strong artillery activity, launched
a counter-attack against the positions
on the east bank of the Narayuvka.
conquered by us Monday. These at-
tacks failed five times with sanguinary
losses."
Petrograd, Nov. 1.-Austro-German
troops invading Roumania through the
Red Tower pass have occupied the
town of Rakovitsa, 12 miles inside the
frontier, and also the village of Pipe-
shti. On the Russian front superior
Austro-German forces compelled a
Russian retreat southward from the
Michisschuv wood.
London, Nov. 1.-British troops sue-
cessfully raided German trenches
northeast of Festubert and in the re-
gion of Messines last night, General
Haig reported today. Intermittent
shelling south of the Ancre was the
,:oy other activity reported.
Paris, Nov. 1.-French troops made
progress north of the Somme last
night in the region of Les Boeus and
repulsed German counter-attacks. from
the north.
HALCYON HOUSE GIVES PARTY
FOR NEIGHBORING STUDENTS
The Halcyon house gave a delight-
ful Hallowe'en party Tuesday evening
for the girls in the neighboring league
houses. Miss Miriam Gerlach also
was a guest. Ghost stories and fortune
telling with cards and palms enter-
tained the visitors. The dancing of
the Virginia reel and the circle two-
step added to the merriment of the
party.
This is one of a series of parties to
be given by a neighborhood group of
league houses. The purpose is to pro-
mote a neighborly spirit between the
girls living in nearby houses.
Resler Addresses Meeting of "Try-Ad"
G. L. Kesler, '17, addressed the "Try-
Ad" club, recently organized advertis-
ing society, at their meeting last night
in the engineering building. Kesler
spoke on the workings of an advertis-
ing agency. His talk was followed by
an informal discussion of advertising
problems.

Richest Man of
His Age Weds
Edsel, Son of Henry Ford, Marries
Miss Eleanor L. Clay,
In Detroit
Detroit, Nov. 1.-Edsel B. Ford, 22
years old, richest man of his age in
the world, was married last evening
to Miss Eleanor L. Clay, 20 years old,
laughter of Mrs. Josephine Hudson
Clay. The bride's family has long
been prominent in Detroit society.
Edsel Ford is the only son of Henry
Ford. The ceremony was performed
at the Clay home on Boston boulevard,
with the Rev. H. Lester Smith, pastor
of the Central Methodist church, of-
ficiating.
Late News Briefs
Washington, Nov. 1.-Ambassador
3ernstorff this afternoon said he had
sent a wireless message to Berlin ask-
ng for all information that may be
obtained there concerning the sinking
of the British steamer Marina with
Americans aboard. He expressed his
awn disbelief in the reports thus far
received.
London, Nov. 1.-A number of wom-
n believed to be members of Mrs.
Pankhurst's Women's Social and Po-
itical union, participated in a dis-
turbance in White Hall street today.
rhey smashed several windows wit
'>ricks on which had been written
'Down With Grey." Two of the dis-
;urbc's were arrested.
Washington, Nov. 1.-A new theory
)f the destruction of the ' British
teamer Marina with loss of American
ife, was given expression by some
Washington officials this afternoon,
vho believe the vessel may have run
nto a mine field. The source of their
nformation was not revealed.
SOCIETY INITIATES ~ELEVEN
fIss Leslie Blanchard Speaks to Mor-
tar Board Members
Mortar Board, senior girls' honorary
society, initiated the following new
nembers last Tuesday evening: Eliza-
beth Arthur, Helen Davis, Olive Hart-
sig, Della Laubengayer, Janet McFar-
lane, Elsie Paul, Ardelle Perkins, Julia
Renwick, Margaret Reynolds, Eva
Sharrow, and Alice Wieber.
After the initiation, which was held
it Newberry Residence, a banquet was
riven at Mack's tea room. Olga Shink-
man, '17, acted as toastmistress and
toasts were given by Dean Myra B.
Jordan, Helen Blair, '16, Albertine
Loomis, '17, and Helen Davis, '17.
Miss Leslie Blanchard, the national
student secretary of the- Y. W. C. A.,
was a guest. She gave a few words
2f greeting from Leland Stanford Uni-
versity where she is a member of the
ap and Gown society which corre-
sponds to Mortar Board society.
The initiates wore mortarboards on
the campus Tuesday, following the
custom of the society. Decorations at
the banquet was carried out in green
nd white, the Mortar Board colors.
LOCAL CHURCHES TO OBSERVE
GO TO CHURCH SUNDAY NOV. b
"Go to Church Sunday" will be ob-
served in Ann Arbor Sunday, Nov.
5, in all the churches of the city. On
that day ministers will deliver special

sermons and all meetings will have
a pre-election spirit.
The idea of setting aside one or two
Sundays each year on which special
efforts are put forth to get negligent
members and non-sectarian people to
attend church has grown in Ann Ar-
bor until the practice promises to be-
come air institution. In the past few
years, on "Go to Church Sunday," the
churches have been filled to overflow-
ing.

Captain Koenig Tells of Life
on Deutschland During Trip
By Carl D. Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
New London, Conn., Nov. 1.-A wine party near the ocean bottom
while a gale raged far over head was one of the many thrilling in-
cidents on the trip of the giant German subsea freighter, Deutsch-
land, from Bremen to New London, Captain Koenig said this after-
noon.
There was plently to keep us occupied while we were submerg-
ed," said the submarine commander. We played the graphophone
and we had wine, yes, plenty of wine." Koenig said he knew nothing
about the submarine Bremen, except that she sailed Aug. 26 with a
60 day food supply. "We are carrying dyestuffs and drugs," he said.
We left Bremen on Oct. 10, in a raging northwest gale.
"Yes, we saw many ships, about the same number as on our
first trip. Some we went around, others we dove under. We travell-
ed less than 125 miles submerged. We saw the grim British war-
ships in the North sea and we saw seven ships between here and
Nantucket."
The captain said he expected to start back to Germany within
a fortnight. Reporters drew with great difficulty, the story of his
audience with the Kaiser from the modest U-boat captain. He told
the Kaiser, he said, that the United States was neutral. "The Kais-
er took things that I said, just as I told them," he added. The Kais-
er, he said, is looking very well.

WILSON'S SPEECH
President Launches Arraignment
Against Application of Foreign
Affairs to Politics
SPEAKS O F TARIFF P 0 L I C Y
By Robert J. Bender
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Buffalo, Nov. 1.-Bitterly arraigning
those who "use the foreign relations
of our country to secure political ad-
vantage," President Wilson today said
such men are unpatriotic. "I want to
register vigorous protest against this
practice," he said.
"I would be ashamed to call myself
a partisan," he went on amidst ap-
plause, "if in the midst of a political
campaign there were those about me
who would make use of the loss of
lives of Americans to make political
capital." He discussed business rela-
tions at length.
how to Get Business Peace.
Peace in the business world of "to-
morrow" depends upon the determina-
tion of employers to treat their men
"as if they were of the same flesh and
blood as you," he told 300 business
men assembled to hear him. The
president received a great reception
when he rose to speak.
"What we need is light more than
heat," he said, in opening. "I will be
glad when the campaign is over, be-
cause we can talk sense again. The
affairs of our country were never so
critically set about as at this moment.
There never was a time when our do-
mestic determinations bore such a
close relation to our attitude toward
the rest of the world. There was never
a time when we should discuss them
more honestly, more thoroughly than
now.
Cannot Decide Tariff Policy.
"American must look upon things
without the passion sweeping other
countries. No man can determine
what are to be the details of working
out the problem facing this country.
The first thing to do is to determine
the facts. When facts are known, we
must soberly adjust our affairs to

Candidate

them. If a man is honest, he can see
facts and appreciate them, whether he Suffrage Association Meets Today
is Democrat or Republican. Our policy The Suffrage association will hold a
regarding tariff cannot be confidently meeting in Newberry hall today, at 4
determined until we know more than o'clock. All women interested in the
we do now concerning our relations to suffrage movement are invited to at-
the rest of the world after the war." tend.

_ ___

HEAR

Le CALLIE
U. HALL 8 O'C

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