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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 31, 1916 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

V

ul

Calkins Drug Coi T Soe
324 So. State and 1123 So. University Ave
Our Soda Fountain has always been known
for the high quality of the drinks and for
cleanliness.

ON

When a man

begins

to pay attention

to

his

clothes he commences to

improve
tions.

in othe? direc-

Smart thes
set the highest standards
for such improvement.

°
i

r
P.
Ode
1

G y 4

Lindenschmidt, Apfel &Co.
204 S. M1am St.
..- - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - --y-

The Eberbach & Son Co.

Good Drugs-Toilet Articles
Chemicals and Laboratory Supplies.
You know the Quality is Right.

The Eberbach & Son Co.

200-204 E.I

Liberty St.

An atmosphere of luxury
and refinement surrounds
the presence of a man
who wears carefully clios-
en and neatly fitted
clothes.

U Takes Pictures
Develops Films
makes Prints
and Enlarge-
713 E Vl wv rIty
ball game between students at Liberty
and Division streets and let the play-
ers off with a warning.

MAR QU ARD T
CAMPUS TAILOR
516 E. Williams St.

Intercollegiate

WILL LECTURE N01, 15
Hindu Philosopher and Poet's Life Is
Explained by N. S. Hardikar
in Interview
Rabindranath Tagore, the famous
Hindu poet and mystic, who will lec-
ture in Ann Arbor on Nov. 15, would
never have been known to the West
had it not been for the arousing of an
interest in Indian philosophy follow-
ing a visit to the United States by
Swami Vivekannda, according to a
statement made last night to a Daily
reporter by N. S. Hardikar, of the
Hindustan association.
"The German scholars, Max Mueller
and Paul Deussen, were the first to ex-
pound Hindu philosophy to the Occi-
dent," said Mr. Hardikar. "They spent
their lives in India, studied the Indian
religious books, and beginning with
the very alphabets of Sanskrit ac-
quainted Europeans with the hidden
knowledge of the Orient.
"Swami Vivekannda, who was sent
by the Hindus as a delegate to the
World's Religious Parliament held in
Chicago in 1893, threw much light on
the subject and established schools of
Hindu philosophy in this country and
in Europe. His efforts were appreci-
ted everywhere and the result was
that a wide study of Indian philosophy
began. The very success of Tagore
lies in the fact that the seed of that
philosophy was sown by Swami Vive-
kannda. Without this introduction
through the ensuing movement, Ta-
gore would never have been known to
the western world.
"The great mystic who is now trav-
eling in this country first received
general attention when he won the
Nobel prize of literature in 1913. The
fact that he won this prize for his
books on philosophical subjects tells
us that Indian philosophy is being ap-
preciated.
"Tagore was born in Bengal in 1861
and lived in Calcutta until he was
24 years old. He then went into the
country to look after his estate. He
established a school called Shanti
Niketan near Calcutta to which he has
given all his money and time."
The money received as the Nobel
prize was handed over to the trustees
of that school.
Tagore is coming to Ann Arbor un-
der the auspices of the Oratorical as-
sociation.
"Y" DEPUTATION WORKERS WILL
ORGANIZE FIRST TEAMS SOON
Movement Is for Purpose of Interest-
ing Towns In Recreation
for Children
Deputation work of the student "Y"
will be organized at once and the
first team, composed of from three to
seven men, will be sent out Nov. 17 to
spend three days in some southern
Michigan town, where they will meet
the business men and fathers and get
them interested in providing whole-
some recreation for the children of the
town.
Last year this student extension
service opened in November and lasted
until the following May, reaching 16
towns in the state. According to the
general plan, a team goes to some
town on Friday afternoon and holds a
banquet that night to which fathers and
their sons are invited to hear talks
delivered by members of the deputa-
tion. On Saturday the team visits the
business men of the town and inspects'
playgrounds, and pool rooms.
Sunday members of the team take
part in the various church services'

and then close the visit with a union
church meeting in the evening ati
which they tell of the conditions found
in the town and effect an organization
for the betterment of local amuse-
ments and plagrounds. A part of the
final meeting is given to a discussion
of the University of Michigan,-

CATHOLIC STUDENTS TO
HAE NEW CLUBHOUSE
Knights of Columbus, of Port Huron,
Pledge $1,100 to Fund for
New Building
Knights of Columbus, of Port Huron,
last week pledged $1,100 to the fund
of $100,000, which is being raised to
build a chapel and clubhouse in this
city for Catholic students now attend-
ing the University.
The donation to the fund was made
after the Rev. M. P. Bourke finished
his address on "University Education"
in which he pointed out the needs of
a chapel and clubhouse for the Cath-
olic students in Ann Arbor.
The site for the proposed building
has been purchased. According to
present plans, ground will be broken
for the new building next summer.
The Rev. M. P. Bourke is at present
touring the state raising funds for the
neyv chapel and clubhouse.
YOUNG LETS CARNE GIE ME AL
FOR EFFORT TO SAVE KORN
Tragedy of Last Year in ley Waters
of Huron Recall.
ed

I

I
I CoPYRIGHT. 1916.
I- ,DLR. BROS. & Co.

F ;
. 7 AN

Floyd
cipient

L. Young, '16L, was the re-
of a bronze medal in the

-

VVF

Do Th

awards made by the Carnegie
fund commission last Friday.

hero

CITY NEWS
Sunday morning; raids on crap
games conducted by Greeks by the
local police force resulted in 19 for-
eigners being arrested. Yesterday
morning seven of the men were ar-
raigned before Justice John Thomas.
and assessed $5.55 costs apiece.
The other six were taken before
Justice William G. Doty and assessed
similar costs with the exception %of
the owner of the house, who was fined
$5 in addition to the costs.. The po-
lice confiscated $13.35 and a 32 caliber
revolver. Officers Kiehl, Blumhardt,
Aprill, and Clarke made the raid..
The 20 Greeks who were taken in
a similar raid the Sunday previous
will come up for trial today.
William J. Saunders, who was ar-
rested for parking his machine in the
middle of State street Sept. 9, and who
at first pleaded not guilty, yesterday
changed his plea to guilty and was as-
sessed $4.00 costs.
Officer Emil Sodt broke up a foot-

Harvard: The Republican club has
offered three prizes for the best
slogan to appear on banners' in the
campaign parade Friday.
Cornell: A wireless station on the
campus has recently received mes-
sages of a commercial sort from
Berlin and Hanover, a distance of
more than 4,000 miles, and from the
Pacific and Honolulu.
Syracuse: On election day the Wom-
en's Athletic association is planning
a big all-Syracuse women's hike end-
ing in a campfire supper as the best
substitute for the ballot.
Oberlin: Organizing for mutual de-
fense and support, 20 red-heads have
made plans for a permanent society
to be called the Order of the Golden
Fleece.
Minnesota: At the end of last week,
pledges for the fund to aid prison-
ers in Europe reached $1,712.50.
Brown: Specimens of Italian Ivy
brought from the Palatine hills in
Rome by Prof. J. T. Shaw will be
planted at the bases of the statues
of Marcus Aurelius and Augustus
Caesar, which stand on the campus.
Iowa: Girls of the university prefer
Wilson, according to election re-
turns which gave the president 193
and Hughes 160.

"Provide
yourself witl
a smile and
air of prospe
ity. Wear
your best bu
iness suit an<
a cheerful
necktie. If
you have no
best suit--bu
one. We has
to appear pr
sperous, if v
are to be pro
sperous."
Come In
REULE,
CONLIN,
FIEGEL
COMPAN1
200-202 MAIN

On Jan. 7, 1916, about 5:45 o'clock
in the afternoon, Young and Harold F.
Korn, '17L, started to skate across the
Huron river from a point opposite the
ice-houses, in order to make a short
cut home. It was already quite dark.
About 100 feet from shore the ice
gave way, and Korn plunged into the
icy current.
Young skated downstream and se-
cured a plank: In the meantime he had
given the warning to a man on the
bank. When he returned the man was
trying vainly to launch a boat. Young
crawled out on the ice shoving the
board ahead of him.
Korn grasped the board and Young
started to drag him toward shore.
About 15 feet had been made when the
ice gave way again and both were
precipitated into the river. Both cried
for help. Finally Korn's grip relaxed,
and he went under. After Young had
been in the river over half an hour,
he was rescued by Officer Emil Sodt,
who had s'ucceeded in launching a
boat.
Korn's body was recovered at 2
o'clock the next morning 100 feet from
where the tragedy occurred. Young
was ill for several days from exposure.
Young is now practising law in Ben-
son, Ind. While in the University he
was president of the C. C. C. and was
also ont the Varsity track squad in
1911-12 and 1912-13. He is a member
of the Phi Alpha Delta fraternity to
which Korn also belonged.
PROF. W. C. HOAD LECTURES
IN CITY PLANNING COURSE
Engineer Speaks on "The Site and
Communication With the
Outside World"
In connection with the course being
given in "City Planning and Beauti-
fying." Prof. W. C. Hoad, of the en-
gineering college,spoke lastSunday
at the Congregational church. His
subject was, "The Site and Communir
cation With the Outside World."
Professor Hoad pointed out that the
site of a city as a rule "just happens."
The first settlers looked for natural
advantages in topography, a water
supply, and means of communication
with the outside world. Harbors and
seaports have a great influence in the
development of cities.
In planning a city the means of
transportation is most important.
Transportation being costly the means

'I

Self - Filling
Fountain Pen-

fSold b} all the
best dealers.
$2.50, $3, $3.50, $4,
$5 and up.

"E NON-LEAKABLE ___-
MEN OF '17, '18, '19 AND '20:-
You will concede the utility and convenience
of a pen that is always ready to write-that
fills itself in 4 seconds-that suits your hand
exactly--that can't leak or blot-that is too
simple to get out of order.
The CONKLIN with its "Crescent-Filler" Is
exactly such a pen-and here's our guarantee.

THE CONKLIN PEN MFG. CO., Toledo,0.

Every Conklin is guaranteed to write and fill
exactly as you think a pen :should-t either does
this or you will be furnished a new ren or your
money refunded without question. There are no
"if v" about it-YO U are the Judge.

Ende
You will find the classiest styles of the season
here,- a profuse array of distinctive models, at prices
that are bound to appeal to you.

All the new ideas in cut and patterns-
cleverly tailored suits in the new tones
and fabrics,
ALL BEARING THE STAMP
OF SIGNIFICANT QUALITY.
Suits $16 to $28.50
Overcoats $15 to $28.50

TOM CORBETT

1

LOST.
LOST.- Pair of light colored bone

rimmed glasses between
and University hospital.
102 12th St. Reward.
Traub.

boat house
Return to
Phone 921
31

LOST - A gentleman's gray castor
glove with black stitching, at Ma-.
jestic or on the street, Saturday ev-
ening. Phone 542-M. E. C. Burill. 31
LOST--Near campus, a red and green
plaid steamer rug. Reward. Eleanor
Leighton, 220 S. Thayer. 1818-R.
29,31
LOST-Let the Michigan Daily find
that lost article of yours through
one of its classified advertisements

MISCELLANEOUS
i TYPEWRITERS of all makes
bought, sold, rented or ex-
changed. Expert repairing,
L factory service. Sole agent Under-
Lwood & Corona. TYPEWRITING,
MIMEOGRAPHING &TSUPPLIES.
0. D. MORRILL, 322 S. State St.
(Over Baltimore Lunch). 582-J.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Single room. Enquire at
716 Church or Alpha Delta Phi
house. oct.21-27
FOR RENT-Single room. 439 S. Di-
vision. Phone 1820-R. 31-N.1-2
i WANTED.

THE YOUNG MENS SHOP
must be made as easy and direct as
possible. In some cases water routes
form substitutes for the railways.
These natural facilities for traffic are
a big saving in investment. There are
many sites which are so hemmed in
that large investments are made nec-
essary for transportation and the
growth of the city.
Such sites as New York and Chicago
which have natural traffic facilities are
in a particularly advantageous posi-
tion as it also tends to make them
the center of railway systems.
Lectures in this course will be given
in the Congregational church at noon
on Sundays, the course being super-
vised by Ray E. Bassett, superintend-
ent of parks and city forester of Ann
Arbor.
Does your museal instrument need
repairs? Take it to Schaeberle & Son,
110 South Main street, for first-class

ADEPHI TO VOTE ON PRESIDENT
AND ISSUES OF THE CAMPAIGN
Members of the Adelphi house of
representatives will meet tonight at
7:30 o'clock in University hall to dis-
cuss the* issues of the presidential
campaign and to vote upon the presi-
dential candidates. At the close of
the meeting candidates for the mid-
vest debating team will draw lots for
positions in the preliminary tryouts
which will take place on Tuesday
evening, Nov. 7. All those trying out
are urged to be present either in per-
son or by proxy when these places
are drawn.
Tired Brain Shouldn't Stop Work
Chicago, Oct. 30.-Don't stop when
your brain Is tired, advises Mt D.
Kidston of the University of Chicago.
"There is an intellectual 'second wind'

116 E. L'BER Y

November Victor Records

Are On Sale Today!

Phone us your order for Approval!
Try them out in your home.

SGrinnell Bros.

116 a. Malt% Sta
PHONE 1707

WANTED-Dressmaking.
12th street.

706 South
27-2 duc

work.

+oc3t3t1 you may use."

I'. ok.ott oumyue

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