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October 27, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-27

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U

THE WEATHER
ANN ARBOR-
FRIDAY PARTLY CLOUDY
AND WARMER

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UNITED PRESS WIRE
DAY AN) NIllIT SERVICE
THE ONLY 3IORIN6(G PAPER IN
ANN ABOR

VOL. XXVII. No. 22.

ANN ARBJOR, MICIJGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1916.

PRICE FIVE C

- tom..

HUGES

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ROUm MN/AN FORGES
HALT GERMANS BY
WRECKING BRIDGE
DANUBE SPAN AT CHERNAVODA,
14 MILES LONG, BLOWN
UP AS DEFENSE
CHECK TRANSYLVANIAN DRIVE

German War Office Admits Loss
Ft.Donaumont; Claims Re'
pulse of Russians

of

By Ed L. Keen
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
London, Oct. 2.-The victorious
sweep of Mackensen's armies in Do-
brudja has been checked, at least tem-
porarily, official dispatches from Ber-
lin, Sofia, Petrograd, and Bucharest
indicated this afternoon. The Rou-
manians have blown up the 14-mile
Danube bridge at Chernavoda, the
greatest bridge in Europe, thus block-
ing an enemy invasion of old Rou-
mania.
The German war officedannounced
this fact this afternoon, declaring it
evident that Roumania feared a Ger-
man sweep towards Bucharest. The
German statement claimed further
progress in the Dobrudja operations,
but mentioned no fresh captures. It
apparently corroborated the Petrograd
statement that Mackensen's offensive
is slackening. A delayed official state-
ment from the Bulgarian war office
announced the capture of a huge
amount of booty at Constanza, but
claimed no further victories.
Roumanians -Check Falkenhayn.
On the Transylvanian front, the Ron-
manians have arrested the progress of
Falkenhayn's armies at several points,
though yielding giround on the Jiul
valley and north of Sinia, in which
direction the Germans made, some
progress, In the house of commons
this afternoon, Premier Asquith gave
further assurance that the allies were
directing anxious attention to the Rou-
manian situation. He said that con-
certed action is being arranged and
that France, Russia, and Italy, as well
as England, are taking every possible
step to relieve the Roumanians.
The last 24 hours of fighting on the
Somme and Verdun fronts have left
the situation virtually unchanged. The
-German war office this afternoon ad-
mitted the loss of Fort Douaumont
and Douaumont village, to the French,
but reported the repuse of violent
French attacks against Fort Vaux yes-
terday. Berlin also claimed the re-
puse of heavy Russian attacks in the
front, west of Lutzk fortress. In
Macedonia, French and Serbian troops
drove northward in a fresh victory
Tuesday, capting two villages and
other German-Balgarian positions.
London, Oct. 2.-Repeated torpedo-
ing of Norwegian ships, while the sub-
marine ,crisis between Norway and
Germany is in a serious stage, led
English papers to declare that rela-
tions between the two countries are
becoming very critical.
London, Oct. 2.-British naval
planes Monday and Tuesday attacked
the town of Buk on the Constanti-
nople-Salonika railroad doing consid-
erable damage.
Berlin, Oet. 26.-During the month
of September, 141 enemy merchant-
men of a total tonnage of 182,000 were
sunk by Austro-German submarines or
mines.. Thirteen captains of enemy
ships were captured and three cannon
taken. In the same period 39 neutral
merchantmen of a total tonnage of
72.Q0O carrying contraband were cap-
tured

Election Bets Are
Now Even honey
Influx of Western Money Causes
Change in Rates Offered
on Yesterday
New York, Oct. 26.-Even money
again was the ruling rate on election
betting today, as western Wilson
money came into the financial dis-
trict. One Wall street man who re-
cently made a killing in steel, was to-
day reported to have bet $25,000 even
on Wilson, and to have $250,000 more
to bet.
Yesterday $100,000 was wagered,
forcing the odds from even back to
10 to 9 on Hughes. Tex Rickards did
a flourishing business on Ohio bets.
He was the go-between in several that
Ohio would go Democratic. One was
$10,000 against $7,000, another $35-
714.28 against $25,000.
Late News Briefs
London, Oct. 2.-The Cenispa
was torpedoed by an enemy sub-
marine Monday and all of her of-
ficers and 73 of her crew were lost,
the Admiralty announced this aft-
ernoon. Twelve men were saved.
Washington, Oct. 26.-Brigadier
Ieneral William A. Mann has been ap-
pointed chief of the division of Militia
affairs of the war department, .Secre-
'ary of War Baker announced today.
General Mann is now in command of
.he American forces at Laredo, Texas.
'e is from Pennsylvania.
New York, Oct. 2.-Private advices
received here today say the 50-foot
yacht Tern has been lost off Cape
Cod on a trip from Boston to New
York. Captain Mayo and three of the
'rew, the dispatches said, were lost.
Rome, Oct. 26.-The vatican today
'mphatically denied rumors that Pope
Benedicte was negotiating for an early
peace between Austria and Russia.
New Argentine
Head Aids Poor
Dr. Irigoyen Arranges to House Poor
In Public Buildngs in
Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires, Oct. 26.-Because of
'ard times Doctor Irogoyen, new rad-
'cal president of Argentine, is arrang-
ing to shelter the destitute of Buenos
Aires in public buildings. He will pay
for their food himself. This step taken
by the new president, one of the first
important decrees he has issued since
Ais inauguration two weeks ago, gave
krgentine its first insight into the
-haracter of its new executive. He
will turn his salary of nearly $100,000
back into the national treasury.
Dental Building to Be Scene of Fire
The fire department organization of
the University will hold the first fire-
drill of the year at 3:30 o'clock Satur-
lay afternoon, Oct. 28. The fire will
supposedly be on the north side of
the dental building, and although the
fire whistle will not blow, at 3:30
o'clock sharp the University employees°
in the fire department organization'
will leave their work and officiate as'
firemen.'
Hillowe'en Party at Union Tonight'
Special decorations have been ar-
ranged for the Hallowe'en party atl
the Micnigan Union Friday night.
Dancing will continue until 1 o'clock.
Phe chaperons are: Mr. Ray Bassett,

city forester, and Mrs. Bassett; Mr.
W. H. Butler and Mrs. Butler. Ther
lance committee is: Louis Hyde, '17E,
chairman; Kemp S. Burge, '17; Carl
Mayer, '18E, and F. S. Brush, '20.

POWERS VESEIN
cOU !Nc ILt OF1 SEVEN

For Hughes.
Faculty ....................
Men over 21.............
Men under 21...............
Women .....................

Provisions
Voted

of City Charter to
on by People Next
Spring

BeI

WORK FALLS IN THREE GROUPS
Extensive administrative and elec-
tive powers vested in a council of
seven members elected on a non-par-
tisan ballot, and a city manager with
exclusive appointive capacity, are
among the provisions which will form
nart of a city charter to be sub-
mitted to the voters of Ann Arbor at
the spring election of 1917.
The administrative functions of the
municipal servants under the new city
plan have been substantially agreed
upon. The commission will recom-
mend a council of seven members to
he nominated on a non-partisan peti-
tion signed by 25 voters of the ward
in which the nominee resides. The
nominees will be elected in the city
at large, with the provision that nom-
inees of each ward will run against
each other so that each ward has a
representative.
The council will be the legislative
body of the city, the board of review,
and the election board. The members
will elect one of their own number
who will serve as mayor. They will
elect a city clerk who will also act as
comptroller, a citytreasurer who will
'et also as assessor, and a city at-
torney. Lastly, they will elect a city
manager who will have the power to
appoint the various employees and, if
necessary, to remove them. The coun-
'ilmen shall be elected for a term of
wo years, four in one year, three in
the next.
The work of the city will fall into
three groups: (1) Department of wel-
are. (2) Department of safety. (3)
Department of construction. The
manager will appoint all his men
under one of these headings.
H UMUR MAGAZiNE OUT TODAY

Total .................... 1,708
For Wilson.

82
1,108
292
226

For Prohibition.
Faculty ....................
Men over 21.................
Men under 21...............
Women................
Total .....................
Against Prohibition.
Faculty ....................
Men over 21.................
Men under 21...............
Women ...................
Total .....................

164
1,761
469
485
2,879
16
333
67
13
429

STATE-WIDE

RIES DAY BY PLURALITY
OF 2,450 VOTES

Faculty ....................
Men over 21..............
Men under 21.............
Women ....................

100
980
242
283

Total ..................... 1,605

Results of Yesterday 's Election

1805 FOR W ILSOI

tI

DIRECTORY SALES BREAKME
ALL FRMER RECORDS
Nearly All Copies of the Book Sold
in Two Hours; Sale Con-
tinues Today
All records for quick sales- of the
Students' Directory were broken yes-
terday, according to Business Manager
F. P. Randall, '17, when the first half
of this year's edition was put on sale
at the book stores. Nearly all the
copies had been disposed of in two
hours. Today the rest of the books
will be put on sale.
The new stiff cover is said to be one
of the reasons for the unprecedented
popularity of the directories. Al-
though the volume seems simple
enough, more than a mile of wire was
..sel in binding the covers to the
books.
MENIA H MEETS SUNDAY NIGHT
So iman to oea on "Jewish
yin Present Crisis"
Prof. I. L. Sharfman, secretary of
i1he economics department, will ad-
dress the Menorah society at its next
meeting at 8 o'clock on Sunday evening
in Newberry hall. Professor Sharf-
man has chosen as his subject for this
occasion, "'The Jewish Duty in the
Present Crisis."
Professor Sharfman is president of
the Intercollegiate Menorah associa-
tion which is composed of more than
50 societies at the various universities
and colleges throughout the United
States. He is also associate editor of
the Menorah Journal, the official pub-
lication of the association, and one of
the founders of the Menorah move-
ment in this country.
STUDENT COUNCIL ANNOUNCES
MEETING TO DECIDE ACTION
The student council announces that
the question of the recent senior law
class election will be discussed and
decided at a special session of the
council tonight.
Members of the student and faculty
bodies are invited to attend.' The
meeting is to be held in Mason hall
on the first floor. Visitors will be ex-
pected at 8 o'clock.
SENIOR LITS ISSUE CALL FOR
MEN FOR SATURDAY'S GAME1

PROHIBITION CA

"Y BRINGS MEMBERSHIP
UP TO THOUSAND MARK
Association Campaign Falls Below
Number Sought, Though Re-
sults Are Good
A conservative estimate, at the end
l of the 'Y" campaign, places the total
number of memberships in the associa-
tion at 1,000,,a number below that set
as the goal for the end of the cam-
paign, but nevertheless satisfactory to
the association officers.
The directors of the campaign feel
that the results obtained are very good
considering that they were allowed
only three days in which to cover the
entire campus in the search for new
members for the student "Y."
Only men with an interest in the
movement could have accomplished
what the captains of the various teams
and their aids did in the recent cam-
paign and the management wishes to
express its appreciation of the efforts
of these men.
FIRST NUMBER OF MICHIGAN
TECHNIC OUT NEXT WEEK
Due to an unavoidable delay the
first number of The Michigan Technic,
which was to have come out this week,
will not appear until sometime next
week. The coming issue gives prom-
ise of comparing very favorably with
the magazine which was publishec
last year. Although it is published by
the students of the engineering depart-
ment, the articles are not all of a
technical nature. This number will
contain plenty of college news, alumni
notes, and accounts of the latest re-
search work in the University.
HALLOWE'EN PARTY GIVEN FOR
FACULTY AND LOCAL ALUMNI
A formal Hallowe'en dancing party
will be given for the faculty and resi-
dent alumni members of the Michigan
Union, Tuesday evening,(Oct. 31, at the
Union. Invitations were issued yes-
terday by the faculty committee com-
posed of Profs. William Frayer, Reu-
ben Peterson, and Henry Bates, and
city forester, Roy Bassett. The price
of the tickets will be $1.25. Special
decorations will be procured and
Fischer's banjorine orchestra will
furnish the music.

'WILSON GETS FACULTY BY 18,
Students of Legal Age and Members
of )Faculty Constitute Quali-
fied Vote
Charles E. Hughes, Republican can-
didate for president, defeated Wood-
row Wilson, Democratic candidate for
the same office, by a plurality of 103
votes in the straw balloting which took
place upon the campus yesterday.
State-wide prohibition carried the day
by a plurality of 2,450 votes. A grand
total of 6,621 votes were altogether
cast by faculty and students on the
two questions involved.
An unusual amount of interest was
taken in the balloting from the mo-
ment the "polls" opened at 1 o'clock
until they closed at 6 o'clock. The va-
rious voting places were often the
centers of hotly contested discussions
in regard to the two issues to be
roted upon, and a lively curiosity as
to the final result was indicated by
the innumerable telephone calls which
°ame pouring into the offices of The
Daily until a late hour last night.
In accordance with a plan formu-
lated only a few hours prior to open-
ing, of the balloting, it was thought
best to question the men students of
the University as to their legal age.
Those over 21 years, together with
members of the faculty constituted a
qualified vote. Those m under the
legal age, as well as the women vot-
ers, constituted an unqualified vote.
In four instances only did Wilson
poll a greater vote than his opponent.
The faculty gave the present executive
a plurality of 18; the women of the
University, of 47; the dental students,
of 13, and the pharmics, of 5. In all
other cases, Hughes claimed the vic-
tory, but usually by a narrow margin.
Twenty votes were cast for Benson,
Socialist candidate, while Hanly, na
tional exponent for the drys, drew 5.
Prohibition for the state of Michi-
gan won easily by a ratio of more
than 6 to 1. The so-called "Home Rule"
bill, or the consideration of the smaller
unit, was not voted upon, although this
issue will come up before the reg-
istered voters at the November elec-
tions, and unless it is voted down and
prohibition voted "yes," the entire
state will not go dry. Those against
prohibition will vote for the amend-
ment, and against prohibition.
Perhaps the biggest surprize of the
day was sprung when the ballot box
placed in the corridor of the Library
was opened. This was dedicated to the
women students of the Literary Col-
lege, and a tabulation of the contents
showed that 13 of the fair sex had
cast their votes against the proposed
prohibition law. The cause of the wets
was defeated by a big majority in
every instance.
Another cause for comment was the
fact that a greater percentage of those
voting in favor of prohibition would
have been unqualified to cast their vote
in the coming election than was the
percentage of the unqualified who
voted against it. Three members of
the engineering faculty, seven of the
literary, one of the law, one of the
medical, and one of the dental facul-
ties voted against prohibition, sup-
posing each vote to come from a mem-
ber of the college or department
J faculty where the boxes were located.

1*

*I

2,000 Copies of First Number Will Be
Put on Sale Today
The Gargoyle, campus joy sheet, will
make its 1916 debut today at noon or
thereabouts. The editors have labored
long to make this first number of the
year a success and if snappy humor
and peppery cartoons count for any-
thing a big sale is assured.
The features of the first issue will
be a double page drawing entitled
"The. Eternal Freshman," by Harry
Leach, grad, who jumped into lasting
fame with The Gargoyle's military
training issue of last year. Leach has
also contributed an "Events of the
Month" page. A number of other car-
toons, said to be the best The Gar-
goyle has ever contained, are also in-
cluded. The feature jokes, wheezes,
and verse, including "The Smell of
the Yukaton," are by R. H. Fricken,
'19. The three-color cover design was
executed by Alan Honey, '17D.
H. Kirk White, '17, business man-
ager, experts the sale of this month's
issue to break all records and accord-
ingly 2,000 copies will be placed at
the disposal of the students.
Although the prices of all other stu-
dent necessities have gone up, The
Gargoyle will be sold for 15' cents as
heretofore.
Women to Outshine MnCl at Indian
In order to outshine the senior men
of the University of Indiana, who float
around in their corduroy trousers the
'17 women have adopted as their of-
ficial headgear a red flannel hat with
white numerals.

I

-_ i

Although the senior lits have been -
holding football practice every after- Hughes Wins Straw Vote at Columbia
noon this week, there have not yet New York, Oct. 26.-Final results of
been 11 men out at the same time, ac- the'straw vote taken at Columbia show
cording to Theodore Cox, class foot- Hughes to be the choice of students
ball manager. A call has been is- and Wilson of the faculty. The table
sued for all members of the senior lit of returns ran as follows: Hughes,
class who have had experience in foot- 1,457; Wilson, 1,451; Benson, Social-
ball, in view of the fact that a game is ist, 114; Hanly, Prohibitionist, 28. The
scheduled for Saturday afternoon with faculty returns were: Wilson, 53, and
the strong soph lit team. Practice will Hughes, 39. Equal suffrage carried by
be held at 3:30 o'clock this afternoon a big majority, 1,232 for and 2,828
on Ferry field. against the movement.

I S __________________

ON THE CAMPUS
ON THE STREET

O N

S A L E

TOD AY

AT THE BOOK STOR
AT THE DRUG STORE

IT'S

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MORE JOKES-M9RE PICTURES-MORE FUN

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