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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 25, 1916 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I kiL 1VllUMIUAIN IJAiLY

PAPERS SAY

. .r

A Li

WING TO THE SCARCITY OF DYES AND THE EM-
ARGO ON WOOL, THERE IS GOING TO BE A SHORT-
AGE OF GOOD WOOLENS FOR MEN'S CLOTHES.
This is true, BUT our showing for Fall and Winter
does not evidence it. We have the best assortment of
all wool fabrics for men's Suits and Overcoats that we
have ever displayed-and at prices within reach of all.
Our $25.00 line will be a pleasant surprise to you.
What is even more vital to you is, that in this entire
line of over five hundred weaves there is nothing but
all-wool fabrics. These, when hand tailored to your
individual measure, will give you ioo cents value for\
every dollar expended.

LYNDON
THE ONE
Who deli
been deliv
right here a
Kodaks
arid
Supplies

719 N. V' iversitY
E PHOTOGRAPHER
vers the Goods and has
ering them for 12 years
among Michigan Students
Gizar anveed
Amateizr
Finishixn

Sheeha1S

NEW MANAGEMENT

on - m

J. K. MALCOLM

4E . Liberty St.

4alcolm Block

Phone 1713-M

-
- -~.
r---
~- /
The attractive figure
of the well dressed -
woman isnot the result
of chance corsetting.
It is the result of a
careful selection of a -
ccrset thas is scientific-
ally correct in design,,
and made of selected
fabrics and "stays."
Back Lace Front Lace
represent the best in
corsetry..~ They are -
high class in every de-
tail, and there is really
no more economical -
purchase for the girl or mE
woman who is inter-
ested in her appearancc e
and wishes to preserve -
her good figure lines
for the years to come. =
Be fitted to a Ped-
fern, and learn for
yourself how admirable
they are.
From Three Dollars Up
FOR SALE BY A

Interco[egiate
Purdue: Lieutenant Kirkwood, of the
Purdue cadet cors, has just re-
ceived notice of the arrival of 1,000
rifles with the accompanying equip-
ment. The 550 military uniforms for
the freshman battalion have also ar-
rived, and will be given out in the
near future.
Minnesota: Freshman grls at the
University of Minnesota have adopt-
ed a rather unusual plan this year.
Each girl has pledged herself to
wear a small green button. The
numerals "20" in the center are sur-
rounded by a small white circle,
which signifies innocence.
Purdue: Purdue students are already
planning for the annual cadet hop
which is to be held in the gymnas-
ium on Friday evening, Nov. 27. The
cadet drill, which has always been
a feature of the dance,'will have to
beomitted this year, as thesnew
rifles will not be ready for use in
time. The grand march will be led
by the colors and trumpeters.
Cornell: Nearly 1,800 undergraduates
reported for drill last week when
the entire cadet corps, consisting of
freshmen and sophomores, drilled
together for the first time. An of-
ficers' reserve corps has been
planned for men who have had two
years of drill work.
Yale: The Yale Pageant, celebrating
the founding of the city of New
Haven, was held in the Yale bowl on
Saturday, when 8,000 actors enter-
tained the 60,000 spectators who
gathered in the stadium.
Northwestern: As a result of the re-
organization of the coast guard
service last summer, the life sav-
ing station by the students of North-
western university since 1868 passed
from their control this fall. The work
of a coast guard is now professional.
Wisconsin: Five fraternities and so-
rorities of the University of Wiscon-
sin have adopted the co-operative
buying system in the hop of reduc-
ing house expenses. The manager
has complete control of buying all
supplies and has charge of all books.
harvard: The Widener library at
Harvard now contains 1,888,542 vol-
umes, and is the largest library in
this country, Yalp ranking next with
1,000,000 books.
Ohio: The Ohio student council is
making an effort to have a branch
of the-city postoffice placed on the
campus for the use of the students.
Purdue: A parade and pageant in
which all students of Purdue uni-
versity will participate has been
planned for Oct. 31, the birthday of
John Purdue, the founder of the uni-
versity.
Washington: Poor acoustic properties
of the new home economics hall
class rooms are blamed for the
garbled notes turned in by students
in lecture courses. It is said that
the lectures of the professors sound
like a mere jumble of words to the
students.

SERIOUS SITUATION IN
MEXICO CROWS CUTE1
Villistas and Carranzistas Move Across
Chihuahua in Increas.
ing Numbers
El Paso, Tex., Oct. 24.-That an ex-
tremely serious situation is develop-
ing in northern Chihuahua was indi-
cated today by reports received here
by United States government agents.
Four hundred men are marching from
the state of Sonora to join the Villa
forces, the report said. From the south
along Torreon and Durango other
bandstare moving northward to rein-
force the Villistas.
Refugees from Chihuahua City con-
tinue to pour into Juarez, the latest
arrivals confirming stories that skirm-
ishing is going on outside the state
capital, between Carranzistas and the
bandit forces. Twelve thousand Mexi-
can de facto troops from three states
are to be sent north to campaign
against Villa, Carranza's counsel gen-
eral, Garcia, announced today upon
his return from Mexico City, where he
held a conference with General Obre-
gon. Two thousand of these troops
wM make Juarez their base of op-
erations.
HANLEY TALKS TO WILSON MEN
Detroit Judge Upholds President Wil-
s s Issues
Judge Stewart Hanley, '04, of De-
troit, addressed the smoker of the
Woodrow Wilson club held at the
Union last night. He first concerned
himself with an analysis of the char-
acters of the two presidential nom-
inees, and gave his reasons for be-
lieving that President Wilson is bet-
ter fitted for the presidency than Mr.
Hughes, tracing their actions in cer-
tain issues that have been brought up
in the campaign. He made special
reference to their attitudes on the so-
called hyphenated vote, ending by as-
serting that if for this reason only
President Wilson was the superior of
Mr. Hughes, it should entitle him to
re-election.
Judge Hanley then went into the
detailed issues of the campaign touch-
ing especially on the question of pros-
perity, the Mexican controversy, and
the Adamson eight-hour law.
The next big smoker of the Wilson
club will be held in the first week of
November, a few nights before elec-
tion. At this time a judge from New
York City will speak, and it is prob-
able that Secretary of War Baker will
be able to come then to deliver an
address, although no definite word has
been received from him on the mat-
ter.
VOTE AT COLUMBIA GIVES
HUGHES MARGIN OVER WILSON
Final results in the straw balloting
for president at Columbia university,
made public yesterday, showed that
Hughes was the choice of the uni-
versity by a margin of six votes. The
table of complete returns gave Hughes
1,457 votes; Wilson, 1,451; Benson, So-1
cialist, 114 votes; Hanley, Prohibition,
28 votes, and Reimer, Socialist Labor, 7
votes.
Suffrage carried by a majority of
1,232, the vote being 2,000 for and 828
against. In compiling the votes it was
noted that two-thirds of the women
voted for Wilson.
President Wilson led in the faculty

voting, the totals being 53 for Wilson,
39 for Hughes, with Hanley and Ben-
son 1 each, and no votes for Reimer.
Teachers' college, the Law school, the
College of Physicians and Surgeons,
and the School of Architecture all
voted for President Wilson also. Co-
lumbia college and the other graduate
schools gave Hughes a majority.
WAR SECRETARY NOT TO QUIT
OVER COLONIAL TROOP CHARGE
Rock Island, Oct. 24.-"I have no
intention of resigning as the result of
the agitation now going on in po-
litical circles in Washington," said
Secretary of War Baker here today in
regard to criticism of his comparison
of colonial troops with Mexican band-
its. "I may have some reply to make
to the charge later."

Wcekof
Mat. IAKR R Ilct
W ed. &uSat. UI ii U ~ Ot2
DETROIT
SAN CARLO
Grand Opera Co.
A C ';'A "D" E
Shows at 3:oo; 6:3o; 8:oo; 9:30
ioc Unles Otherwise Specified.
Phone 296-M.
Wed.-25-Clara Kimball Young in "Dark
Silence"; Matt & Jeff Cartoon. 15c.
Thlur.26-rene Fenwick in "A Child of
e,tnv('''RA.); Ilie.I "IURK) in
-Gloria's Romance" (4th Chap. "The
Social Vortex").
Fri-27-Nance O'Neil in "The Iron Wo
man"; Drew comedy.

y 'S
C. W R H A M N g"
s .1

TEX BOKS ndSUPPLIES-
FOR ALL COURSES
Real Values in Second-Hand Books
w..NOT ENBOOKS
FOU NTA IN PEN S
DR AW iNG NSTR ME TS

EVERY STUDENT NECESSITY

°--"°

Matinees, 2:00-3:3o; Evening, 6:45,
8:r5, 9:30.
Saturdays-Holidays continuous.
Wed.-25-Mary Pickford in "The Girl of
Yesterday." Rebooked.
Thur.-'ri -26-27-Sessue Hayakara in
"The Honorable Friend." Also Bray
Cartoons.
Sat.-28-H. B. Warner in "Shell 43." Also
Triangle Comedy, De Wolf fopper in
I "Puppets." EVe. rye.
A1-JE ST
3-7:30 and 9 P. M.
EVA FA
ON THE FARM

WHITNEY

THEATRE

ANN ARBOR'S CIVIC ASSOCIATION
PRESENTS
ANN ARBOR DAS
WITH
MISS iiIRIAM HUBBARD
AND
MR. J. R St. CLAIR
Every student, every school child, and 20,000 citizens
in moving pictures.
Commencing Thursday Night,
October 26, and three performances daily,
October 27, 28 and 29

BABY HELEN

ALL SEATS 25

CENTS

NIASON & MURRAY
MARIE GENARO
TODAY AT 3:00. ie.
SPECIAL LADIES MATINEE
AT WHICH EVA FAY WILL
ANSWER ALL QUESTIONS..
Y r
BANK MESSENGER ON JOB WHEN
AUTO BANDITS RUN WITH $3,200
Chicago, Oct. 24.-Wm. Gromeman,
bank messenger for the Lake View
Trust and Savings bank, was held up
and robbed of $3,200 by four auto
bandits late today, but the robber did
not get far. Gromeman jumped into
a passing auto and gave chase. Turn-
ing a corner the bandits' car skidded,
throwing all the occupants to the side-
walk. Gronmeman with a policeman
spotted the man with the money, while
the others escaped.
Church Conference Favors "Drys"
St. Louis, Oct. 24.-The house of
deputies of the Protestant Episcopal
church of America in conference here
today, went on record in favor of pro-
hibition. The deputies adopted a reso-
lution introduced last week giving
church sanction that will aid in sup-
pressing the liquor traffic. The reso-
lution will. be sent to the house of
bishops for concurrence.
To Receive Election Returns at Union
Plans are now under way to receive
complete election returns at the Union
building on the night of November 7.
The returns will be received by wire
from 6:30 until 4 o'clock the next'
morning. During the evening an en-
tertainment consisting of several musi-
cal numbers will be given. The din-
ing room will be open and soft drinks
will be served.
Daily Makes Correction of Error
An article in The Daily of Oct. 15
announced the marriage of J. F. Scott,
'16, to Miss Ednah O'Connor. The
bride was incorrectly- said to be a
graduate of the Law school, and The
Daily wishes to rectify the error.
Does your musical instrument need
repairs? Take it to Schaeberle & Son,
110 South Main street, for first-class
work. oct3tf

Direction-E. H. Spears of the S. and S. Feature Film Co.
and Prof. Kenyon, of the University of Michigan

Matinecs at 3 P. M.
Night 7:30 and 9.

No Reserved
Seats.

See Yourself in the Movies!

MAN SERVING SENTENCE OF TWO
YEARS PARDONED BY WILSON
Washington, Oct. 24.-After serving
more than a year for an offense for
which the supreme court held no per-
son could be convicted, W. M. Clark
today was pardoned by President Wil-
son. Clark pleaded guilty in the east-
ern Michigan federal court to violat-
ing the Harrison anti-narcotic law, by
having drugs in his possession. He
wq.is sentenced to two years. Later the
of preme court held in another case
that it is not a violation of the law
merely to possess narcotic drugs.
LABORER RUN DOWN AND HURT
BY MACHINE WITHOUT LIGHTS

WHAT'S GOING ON
Today.
2:30 to 5:30 o'clock-Junior engineer
class elections, room 348 engineering
building.
3:00 o'clock-Fresh pharmic class
meeting, room 300 chemistry building.
7:30 o'clock-Monthly meeting of the
A. L E. E., room 248 engineering
building.
7:30 o'clock-Military training can-
didates meet at engineering arch.
Tomorrow.
8:00 o'clock-Meeting of girls' upper
section of Deutscher Verein.
U-Notices.

Dirs. Beutinger to Plead Self-Defense
Newark, N. J., Oct. 24.-Self-defense'
is expected to be the plea of Mrs.
Margaret C. Beutinger, the wealthy
Caldwell, N. J., woman charged with
murdering her husband, when her trial
begins here today. Minor cases may
delay the proceedings but Mrs. Beu-

tinger will be in court and her case
may come first,' according to schedule. '. V. Baker,'16, Weds Miss Ensminger
Word was received at The Daily of-
Mrs. Beutinger is alleged to have flees Monday announcing the fact
said soon after the killing that she that Gerald V. Baker, '16, was mar-
shot her husband to death as the re- ried to Miss Hazel Ensminger of
sult of an impulse because he abused Union City, Mich., on Sept. 6. Mr.
her bodily. The state contends Mrs. Baker entered the state agricultural
Beutinger bought a gtmn by mail in college at Ames, Iowa, this fall, where
New York a few days before the shoot- he will take a two-year course along
ing. I a special line of agriculture.

t

While riding a bicycle on Williams
street Monday night, Frank Cook, a
laborer, was run down by an auto-
mobile driven by Mrs. M. E. Dixon, and
suffered a few minor bruises. There
were no lights on the car, the police
say.
Fined Because He Ran Street Car
While under the influence of liquor,
Ben Harris, 23 years of age and col-
ored, boarded a southbound University
car at Main and Huron streets Mon-
day night and proceeded to run the
car to suit his own particular fancy.
Yesterday morning he was arraigned
in Justice Thomas' court and fined $10
and costs.
Phi Signia to Hold Meeting This Week
Phi Sigma, biology society, will hold
a meeting at 8:15 o'clock next Thurs-
day evening in room 231 natural sci-
ence building. H. C. Fortner, '17, and
H. S. Liddell, '17, will give talks.
Marian Wilson,18, Resigns from M.E.S.
At the first meeting of the Univer-
sity of Michigan Equal Suffrage asso-
ciation, the resignation of the presi-
dent, '18, was accepted, and Florence
Fitzpatrick '18, was elected in her
place.
Deutscher Verein Wienie Roast
About 40 members of the Deutscher
Verein attended the wienie roast Mon-
day afternoon at Palmer field. Prof.
Carl Eggert and Mrs. Eggert chap-
eroned the party.
Call 600 for expert typewriting.

All students who missed examina-
tions last June must apply at the
registrar's office relative to making
them up.
All candidates for junior lit football
team meet at Ferry field at 4 o'clock
today. Those who cannot come please
phone 747R.
Tickets for the Michigan Union Fri-
day night dance will go on sale at
5 o'clock today. The price will be
$1.50.
Those interested in soccer football
meet at Ferry field intramural club-
house at 4 o'clock today.
Junior engineers' football practice at
4 o'clock today at Ferry field. All
junior engineers are requested lo bring
suits and try out for the team.
There is room for two or three more
good acts in the Band Boost. Those
who wish to try out should have their
specialty ready at 7:30 o'clock Friday
night. Call Atlas, 1104, for meeting
place.
Fresh Lits Nominate Officers Today
The fresh lits will hold their nomin-
ations for class officers this afternoon
at 4 o'clock in room 101, economics
building. At this time a football man-
ager will be elected to enable the class
team to get under way. Student
Councilman A. S. Hart will beiin charge
of the meeting.
Prof. A. B. Stevens Called Rome
Prof. A. B. Stevens, of the College
of Pharmacy, was called home tb De-
fiance, Ohio, last Saturday, because of
the death of his brother who was a.
practicing physician in that city.
'ax print at Sugden's. oct3-29

I

LIBERLTY AT 606
Do . G ENN1AN
Cusomad
Golf Riding
.ikr5&a' LI1BERTY AT 606 Breeches

.ntxcre

AJA"A j A,% 3 i t a. s v v v

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