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October 25, 1916 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'e are ready to show you the
est Line of Men's

PASTORS URGE AID FOR
UNFORTUNATE ARMENIANS

1-,. I

Suits,

Hats

Caps and
Furnishings

Jy
T
lamb

WADHAMAS' CT.o
MAIN ST.

State St. Store
Nickels Arcade

COMPLAINS OF 'LEGS'

FRESHMAN STATES THAT
LIBRARY CHAIRS ARE
"SNUBBERS"

MANY
MINUS

Editor The Michigan Daily:
Hunbly, as becoxmes my station, I
would like to call attention to a need
which must already be apparent to
everyone.
About a third of the chair legs -in
the Library reading room have rub-
ber caps or "snubbers." The effect is
as though there were none at all. The
mere fact that home of the chairs are
euipped with these noise throttlers is
indication that the Powers That Be
have at some time recognized their
value; not only as aids to concentra-
tion, but as checks upon otherwise
unavoidable disorder which is not
proper in a place of study.
The cost of equipping all the chair
legs with rubber tips certainly would
not be staggering, and the writer can
hardly think of an equally small ex-
penditure which would result in more
proportionate good to a large number.
Benjamin Franklin evidenced an an-
preciation of the value ofT "iittle
things" when, as a private citizen, he
proposed a plan for the regular sweep-
ing of the street crossings of Phila-
delphia, and showed the town board
how to increase the effectiveness of the
corner lamps. Enboldened by the ex-
ample of a great man, I venture the

above suggestion, in the honest hope
that it will be seen by some one who
is in a position to "start something,"
and is not above receiving a sugges-
tion, however lacking in originality
or point, from a
FRESHMAN.
CONFER DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
LAWS ON EDISON BY 'PHONE
University of the State of New York
Is Giver of Honor
Albany, N. Y., Oct. 24-The degree
of Doctor of Laws was conferred by
telephone on Thomas A. Edison, the
inventor, by Dr. J. H. Finley, presi-
dent of the University of the State of
New York, at the closing of the insti-
tutions fifty-second convention. Mr.
Edison was in his laboratory while the
degree was being conferred.
This is the first case on record in
which a university degree was con-
ferred by telephone, and Mr. Edison
is the second person to recieve a'de-
gree of Doctor of Laws from the Uni-
versity of New York, the only other
holder of this degree being former'
United States Senator Elihu Root.
To Hold Dance in Combined Gyms'
The Union will hold a big dance in
the combined gymnasiums on the
night of the Pennsy game, Nov. 18.
This dance will be for Union members
only. The occasion will mark the re-J
opening of Waterman gymnasium.

Y. W. C. A. Will Conduct Charity Re-
ilef for Stricken People
in Near East
Pastors last Sunday urged their
congregations to contribute heartily to
the "Armenian Relief Fund" day,
which is to be held between the hours
of 10 and 2 o'clock on Saturday, Oc-
tober 28, under the auspices of the
University Y. W. C. A.
Untold misfortunes have been ex-
perienced by the Armenian and Syrian
peoples, but at the present time the
conditions are more horrible than
ever. Women and children have been
deported by the thousands, while the
men have been led away in groups
outside the villages and killed with
axes and clubs. On one occasion 10,-
000 Armenians were taken out in
boats, batteries of artillery trained on
the boats as targets, and the entire
company killed.
The Armenians in the United States
are endeavoring to solicit financial aid
for their kinsmen at home. Last Sat-
urday was proclaimed as a national
relief day by the president for the
stricken Christians of Turkey, and it
is hoped that the monetary returns
will add greatly to the amount that is
needed to raise the persecuted peoples
to the standardized conditions of liv-
ing. Former Ambassador Henry
Morgenthau said that $5,000,000 is nec-
essary to furnish food, clothing, and
shelter. According to statistics, one
dollar will keep one person alive one
month, and 25 dollars will enable
an Armenian family to be established
in comparative comfort.
EMMA GOLDMAN TO SPEAK
Famous Woman Anarchist to Talk on
Russian Literature
Friends of Miss Emma Goldman an-
nounced yesterday that she would ap-
pear in Ann Arbor on Dec. 4, 5, 6, and
7, to conduct a course of six lectures
on Russian literature.
Miss Goldman, who spoke last year
on "Nietzsche, the Intellectual Storm
Center of the World" and "Birth Con-
trol-Why and How Small Families
Are Desirable," was well received by
her audiences on both occasions, and
her coming is looked forward to by
those interested in the literature of
Russia. That she is qualified to take
the lectureplatform is proved by the
fact that she has given a number of
lectures in Pittsburg and Washington
on the subject of "The Modern
Drama."
Miss Emma Goldman is the author
of "Anarchism and Other Essays" and
of "The Social Significance of the
Modern Drama." She is also th'e pub-
lisher of the Mother Earth magazine.
OR. PAUL HARRISON TO TALK
Arabian Social Worker Will Address
Medical Students

AAa-%
COLLARAS
GO WELL WITH BOW OR FOUR-
IN-HAND 15 cts. each, 6 for90cts.
CLUETT PEABODY &CO. INC.MAKeRS
Rs Alarm Clocks
~ E 1.00 up
Fountain Pens-
Waterman and Conklin
U. of M. Jewelry
Schianderer &USeyfried

New Fall Neckwear, Hats
and Underwear

TYPEWRITING
MULTIGRAPHING
MIMEOGRAPHING
Typewriters for sale or rent.
Hamilton Business College

VARSITY TOGGERY SHOP
1107 So. Univ.

,_. _

_._. ..

... ._.

SYRCUSE ALUMNI PLAN
LIVING ENDOWMENT FU NO

T H ER]E'S A REASON
Whether you subscribe for one magazine or for several, your orders
will have my prompt and careful attention. Last chance clubs with
last chance prices and a special offer to students for the school year.
I will come to you.
J1o. P. Sloan, The Magaaztne Man
1009 . Catherien St. Phenu 1412-M

There are reasons more
than one why you
should buy a
Society Brand
Suit and Overcoat
You'Il be convinced we are
right when you look these
garments over.
J. F. Wuerth Co.
Next t, Orpheum

Every Alumnus to Pledge Sum
Support of Eastern
University

for

SERVICE

,_
r

- -

.

Syracuse, N. Y., Oct. 24.-"A mil-
lion dollars for Syracuse university"
is the watchword of the promoters of
a living endowment plan which is be-
iig fostered among Syracuse alumni
all over the country. The first an-
nouncement of this plan was made
some time after the university opened
this fall, and it has already reached
large proportions through the en-
thusiastic support of the alumni.
The plan is for every alumnus of
the university to pledge whatever sum
he feels he can afford for the support
of the university, the total amount be-
ing one million dollars. No man pays
his pledge in full, however, but pays
the university the interest on his
pledge each year, at the rate of five
per cent. An alumnus who pledges
$1,000 pays $50 each year toward the
support of the university.
A clause is included in each pledge
signed by the alumni, by which pay-
ments may be deferred or even discon-
tinued in case of serious financial re-
verses over which the pledge has no
control.
This same plan, or a similar one
has been adopted by the alumni of
many state universities and other edu-
cational institutions. Oberlin first in-
augurated the living endowment sys-
tem, and Princeton has met with great
success through a similar plan.
84 MEN CLIMB EIGHT-MILE
MOUNTAIN PATH IN TWO HOURS

It is our consis'ait endeavor to keep a full and entensive
stock of all last-word models throughout the season, but THIS
is the time when the stock i, freshest and most fascinating.
This is the time to select your GARMENT.

WE DO

I' Women's and Children's Apparel

'

Main St. Corner Liberty

r,

Prominent

Educators

Express Vie

D. S. JORDAN ENDORSES WILSON
Says Policies Will Win Favorable Ver.
dict From History
The Daily Maroon, the college paper
of the University of Chicago, prints
the following letter of Dr. David Starr
Jordan, endorsing Woodrow Wilson.
The' letter has been sent out to col-
leges and universities all over the
United States and to individual col-
lege men.
"I am much interested in the growth
of political clubs within the univer-
sities, not as partisan organizations,
but as associations of men and women
competent to weigh the issues of the
day and of the future of democracy,
while they themselves are becoming
increasingly fitted for wise counsel and
action.
"With regards to party differences
and previous affiliations, I believe with
you that the highest interest of the
republic' will be served by the re-elec-
tion of President Wilson. I recognize
that in the large elements of his
policy, domestic and foreign, President
Wilson has striven to gain the final
favorable verdict of history.
"There can be no nobler aim than
this in national administration and
this favorable verdict Mr. Wilson will
secure and will deserve.
"DAVID STARR JORDAN."

I

ACCEPTS HUGHES' ANSWEI

Prof.'

Van Tyne Thinks "Hyph
Will Be Disappointed

To the Editor of The New York Times
Some six weeks ago you published
a letter of mine expressing my un
willingness to support Mr. Hughee
unless by some unequivocal utterano
he made it impossible for any reason
able "hyphenate" voter to claim hin
as the logical candidate of'those wh
demand subservience to Germany. Hi
recent reply in Louisville to the ques
tion as to what he would have don
in the case of the Lusitania is ver:
satisfactory to me.
Any "hyphenate" whose mind work
so regardless of the rules of logic ao
to conclude that Mr. Hughes would
have solved our diplomatic contro
versies with Germany more to Teutonic
taste than has President Wilson is wel
come to his delusion. As for me,
shall vote for Mr. Hughes and exped
to see him show moral courage ever
in the face of "frightful" Germany, the
international "Bugaboo Bill."
C. H. VAN TYNE,
Ann Arbor, Mich., Oct. 17, 1916.

LOST.
LOST-Friday evening at School of
Music Faculty reception, grey purse
containing bills and small change.
Call Edith Jetter, 961-M or 1105-J.
Reward. 25
LOST-A silver bow-knot, between
Martha Cook Dormitory and Presby-
terian Church, last Sunday. Finder
please return to Dormitory. Re-
ward. 25
LOST-Saturday, old fashion brooch,
butterfly shape, set with garnets.
Vajued as a keepsake. Reward.
Phone 1545-R. 25
LOST-On or near Campus, two pins,
one with pink setting, the other
black with pearl. Finder please
phone 1310-M. 25
LOST-Blue overcoat, taken by mis-
take from Natural Science Bldg.
Reward. Call W. R. Hatfield. Phone
1629-W. 22-24-25
LOST-Pair of brown bone rimmed
glasses on Saturday. Reward. Find-
er return to Michigan Daily office.
25-26
LOST-During flag rush red Y-neck
sweater. Return to 537 Church or
phone 178-W, for reward. 24
LOST-Pair of noses glasses in room
F. or K. of Law building. Phone
1565 or call at Daily. 25
LOST--Blanket robe, from Armory
Saturday night. Please return to H.
J. Waessner. 1118-M. 25-26

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Very desirable front
suite, centrally located. Call 811-J.
437 Hamilton Place. -24-25
FOR RENT-Single room. Enquire at
716 Church or Alpha Delta Phi
house. oct.21-27
FOR RENT-Very desirable front
suite, centrally located. Call 811-J.
22-24-25
WANTED
WANTED-Student laundry work by
an experienced and competent Laun-
dry. Phone 1487. 19-20-21-22-24-25
WANTED-A good second hand guitar.
Cali at 717 E. Huron St. or phone
1022-R. 24-25
WANTED-If you are in need of any-
thing, The Michigan Daily can help
you get it through its Classified De-,
partment.;
FOUND
FOUND-Black leather purse in car
parked in Tappan school yard, after
midnight. Owner's card in purse.
May have same by identifying and
paying for this advertisement, at the
Quarry Drug company. 25
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Splendid bargain in valu-
able Mandolin. Phone 846-J. 25-27-29
FOR SALE-Have you something that
you want to sell? If so, let the Mieh-
igan Daily sell it for you through its
Classified Department.

Dr. Paul Harrison, who has recent-
ly returned from Arabia where he has
been doing social work among the
natives, will be in Ann Arbor from
Saturday, Oct. 28, until the following
Monday. While here he will talk be-
fore the various campus medical clubs
and fraternities in an effort to interest
some of the students of the medical
school in the work which he has been
carrying on, and if possible to get
some of them to accompany him when
he returns to Arabia.
The American Magazine recently
published a two page article, includ-
ing a cut of Dr. Harrison, on the work
which the doctor has been doing
among the people of Arabia. Among
other things it tells how Dr. Harrison
won his way into the hearts of one
particular tribe of the Arabians by
saving the life of the chieftain of that
tribe.
While in America the doctor will
visit all of the best medical schools
in an attempt to secure aid in the
work. Upon his return to Arabia he
will seek a way to penetrate a section
of that country never before visited by
a white man.
Leave your film at the Delta.
ect3 to 29

Santo Domingo, Oct 24.-In a test
of endurance, conducted by Lieutenant
Kingston, of the United States marines
in Haiti, to determine the staying
powers of his men, 118 men, ranging
in age from 19 to 52 and carrying the
regulation field equipment, were given
the test of ascending a steep mountain
path, approximately eight miles, with-
in a two-hour limit.
Eighty-four men accomplished the
feat in the prescribed time, and of
those, 20 per cent were veterans of 44
years and over. The average age of
those who succeeded was 29 years,
while the percentage of tenderfoot re-
cruits among the losers reduced their
average to 24 years.
Horticulturists Meet in Grand Rapids
The 46th annual .meeting of the
Michigan State Horticultural society
will be held in Grand Rapids, Dec. 5 to
7, in the audience room of Coliseum.
The large exhibition hall in the Annex
will be used for the display of spray
machinery, spray material and other
articles used in fruit growing. Sever-
al attractive features are being plan-
ned which include a fine display of
fruit. Program books will be ready
for distribution in November and final
arrangements for the event will be
made in several weeks.

Ann Arbor 's Hans
Sachs Writes Poem
(Written by Dr. Tom Lovell, Oct. 24,
1916, copyright reserved.)
It can never be withdrawn unless it's
put in
A dollar to say it's mine,
So take my tip and commence at once
To have one in to find.
Then it will give you an appetite,
To never rest not until
One is meant for a dollar to reach
To meet your honest bills.
You may be poor to say I can't,
Never get a dollar to put away,
That's what the tempter always says,
To one who will never try.
So shut your ears from listening to
Procrastination that wants
You to put off to another day
From making the first account.
In this country of fame to make a man
Of you to rise to gain,
A position of trust to be put in
If as poor as Lincoln once was,
Who rose from a little wooden hut
To the house that's white by name,
Where President Wilson is found to-
day
With a personality without a stain.

This country with its rocks and rills
Its mountains and its plains,
Speaking to young men in powerfu
voice
To become brave to stand,
By giving their strength for a nobl(
name
To keep this country from stain,
Like the fathers who started it
Who came this side of the waves.
START SEARCH FOR BODIES
FROM "BLACK FRIDAY" STORM
Cleveland, Oct. 24.-With the depart
ure of a revenue cutter this afternoon.
the search for the bodies of Lake Erie'i
"Black Friday" storm was vigorously
begun. The number of probable dead
stood at 46 tIis afternoon when it was
learned that two sailors on the origina
list of the Colgate did not ship. Prop
erty loss from the 90-mile gale was
placed at $500,000. Seven bodies have
been recovered but that many more
will be found, is expected.
Alumni Memorial Hall Gets New Lamp
A handsome lamp has been
presented to Alumni Memorial hall by
Mrs. Homer P. Finley. The'lamp was
given in memory of Duane Doty, '66
who served as adjutant in the 7th
Michigan cavalry.

-

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