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October 25, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
ANN ARBOR-
PROBABLY RAIN
AND WARMER

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y
"AN

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A Y

UNITED PRESS WIR
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
THE ONLY MORNING PAPER 1
ANN ARBOR

VOL. XXVIL No. 20.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1916.

PRICE FIVE C

ROUMANIAN TOWN
of RASOVA FALLS
BEFOREGERMANS
VON MACKENSEN'S DRIVE FROM
DOBRUDJA CONTINUES
SUCCESSFUL

Behind H.C.ofL.

Secretary Redfield Absolves
of Blame, Placing It on
ropean Soldiers

Wall St.
Eu-u

Washington, Oct. 24.--Twenty mil-
lion men fighting in Europe, producing
nothing, consuming enough food for
30,000,000 men and enough clothing for

80,000,000 are behind the high cost of
6,693 MEN TAKEN PRISONER living in this country, not Wall street,

Central Allied Troops Reach Cara-
murat While Predeal Falls in
Hot Engagement
Berlin, Oct. 24.-The Roumanian
Danube town of Rasova, eight miles
south of the important bridge head of
Chernavoda and the railroad junction
of Nedjidia have been captured by
von Mackensen's army.
"The enemy is yielding in confusion
before our right wing," said an official
statement.' "Pursuing cavalry of the
German-Bulgar-Turkish troops has
reached the district of Caramurat
(north of Constanza). The total booty
including that reported Oct. 21, is 75
officers, 6,693 men, one flag, 52 ma-
chine guns, 12 cannon, and one mine
thrower.
"The sanguinary losses of the Rou-
manians and Russian reinforcements
brought up in a hurry are very heavy.
On Archduke Carl's front south of
Kronstadt, the town of Predeal was
captured yesterday by Germans and
Austro-Hungarian troops in a violent
engagement. Six hundred prisoners
were taken on the southeast of Red
Tower pass during the past few days,
Roumanian resistance having been
broken. The fortress of Bucharest has
once more been bombed. On the
Macedonian front there is nothing
new."
Faris, Oct. 24.-Kaiser William is
reported to have arrived at the
Bapaume front to supervise prepara-
tions for a heavy German counter of-
fensive north of the Somme.
London, Oct. 24.-The Serbian first
army advanced on the whole front in
the Cerna region Sunday, taking enemy
first line trenches. On Sunday night
they won fresh victories north of
Veljeszelo.
Berlin, Oct. 24.-Fighting of the
greatest violence continued yesterday
on the Somme front. In order to
break through at any price, the Eng-
lish and French continued their at-
.tack with strong forces. In spite of
their use of these masses north of the
Somme, they suffered heavy sanguin-
ary defeat. Entire rows of dead are
lying one upon another, especialy east
of Le Trausley (the British war of-
fice announced last night the capture
of 1,000 yards of trenches in this re-
gion).
Paris, Oct. 24.-A rather violent ar.
tillery combat on the front of Biadhes-
Ablaincourt, south of the Somme, was
reported today, but no infantry actions
occurred during the night.'
London, Oct. 24.-Capture of Con-
stanza by the Germans and Bulgarians
was admitted in a Bucharest message
transmitted by wireless from Rome
today. It was asserted, however, that
the enemy took little booty, since the
evacuation of the port was decided
upon some time ago. The kaiser has
sent a telegram of congratulations to
Czar Ferdinand of Bulgaria.
Gompers to Campaign for Wilson
Washington, Oct. 24.-Samuel Gomp-
ers, president of the American Fed-
eration of Labor, and Secretary Frank
Morrison, will personally take the
stump in favor of the re-election of
Presidient Wilson, it was announced
at labor headquarters here this after-
noon.

Secretary of Commerce Redfield stated
today.
"The world is at war," he said. "It
is probably within the truth to say that
20,000,000 men of the most productive
ages are withdrawn from productive
work, and are spending their time
fighting. On the other hand, these men
are consuming much more than they
would consume if they were working.
"It is further true that factories in
all the belligerent countries that or-
dinarily produced goods for general
use are busy on war munitions. Four
thousand such factories are so en-
gaged in Great Britain alone. The
same is true of every belligerent coun-
try to some degree, but to a very much
smaller degree in our own country.
The result is that at the time of the
greatest consumption the producing is
greatly reduced."
ATTITUDE OF STUDENTS
FOR Y M C aCHANGES
New Building Makes Good Impression
as Shown by First Day of
Campaign
Results of the first day of the "Y"
membership campaign show that
about 250 nw members were ob-
tained. With the system of canvass-
ing not yet in smooth working form
these results are very satisfactory to
the campaign managers. Tonight some
of the newness of the work and rough
spots in the system will have worn
off, and as a result, association of-
'icers expect to add 500 new names to
the membership record of the "Y."
Captains of some of the canvassing
teams report that their men have
noticed a decided change in the man-
ner in which students receive their
solicitations as compared with former
years. This is probably due to the
extensive advertising of the campaign
and to the stronger talking points for
the "Y" as developed through the
building of the new association home.
There is now little doubt that the
2,000 memberships which the associa-
tion is striving for will be secured by
the end of the three-day campaign.
FORM SOUTH AFRICAN UNION
2 Students Organize and Name Their
Officers for Year
South African students of the Uni-
versity have banded together to form
a society to be known as "The South.
African Union of the University of
Michigan." This is following a pre-
cedent set by South Africans studying
at the Medical and Dental colleges in
Edinburgh, Scotland. There are now
25 South Africans enrolled in the Uni-
versity, 23 of which are in the Col-
lege of Dental Surgery. This year
two women from South Africa have
enrolled.
At a meeting held in the Congrega-
tional church parlors last Sunday the
following officers were elected for the
year 1916-1917: President, Clifton G.
Maree, '17D; vice-president, T. R.
Engels, '17D; secretary and treasurer,
David Cohen, '19D, and administrative
board, Lennox Schmidt, '18D; R. V.
Bird, '18D; R. A. Melcher, '1D, and
Nicholas Van Heerden, '19D.

FAMOUS WRITER
SPEAhKSTONIGHT
Liuncoln J. Sleffens to Outline Mexican
Situation From Be-
ginning
'O BE GUEST OF DAILY STAFF
Lincoln Steffens will speak on
"Mexico and the Land Question" in
the high school auditorium at 8 o'clock
tonight. Mr. Steffens is widely known
as a writer on political and sociolog-
ical subjects, and knows the Mexican
situation at first band. Prof. Philbert
Roth of the forestry department will
introduce the speaker, who has agreed
to answer any questions concerning
Mexico which may be asked him at
the close of his lecture. Tickets will
be on sale at the door for 15 cents.
Mr. Steffens will outline the situa-
tion in Mexico at the outbreak of the
revolt, tracing the movement up to
the present time, after describing the
Diaz government as it controlled Mex-
ico before it was overthrown. He
will pay especial attention to the land
question in Mexico, and show its rela-
tion to the present unsettled condi-
tions. lie will also draw a com-
parison with the UnitedStates in the
matter of land laws and their enforce-
ment.
Mr. Steffens will be tendered a lunch-
eon at the Michigan Union this noon
by the staff of The Michigan Daily.
T. R, HITS AT CHICAGO RIOT
Declares "Mob" There Typifies "Too
Proud to Fight"

A

Gargoyle Plans
Cleer Number
First Issue Of Humor ?Iagazine to
Appear Friday; Will Be
Syracuse Edition
"Bigger and better than ever."
This is the slogan of the 1916-1917
Gargoyle according to Business Man-
ager H. Kirk White. With this end
in view the first edition of the Gar-
goyle which comes off the press Fri-
day will number 2,000 copies, this sum

WILL TAKE STRAW
VOTE OF MICHIGAN
CAMPUS THURSDA
FACULTY MEN AND WOMEN S'1
ENTS MAY CAST
BALLOTS
MUCH INTEREST IN RESUl

being 500 more than the Gargoyle has Boxes for Votes Will Be Installed

4,

*

(By J. P. Yoder, United Press Staff
Correspondent.)
Denver, Oct. 24.-In a speech to the
womenvoters of Colorado who enter-
tained the Hughes women s special
tourists, and ex-President Roosevelt
jointly, the colonel this afternoon
strongly denounced "The mob that
attacked the women in Chicago during
President Wilson's recent visit there."
"This is typical of the mob spirit
which 'too proud to fight' has
aroused throughout the country," de-
clared Roosevelt. "The spirit of that
Chicago mob, which I am happy to
say, does not typify the real Chicago
spirit, is exactly similar to the spirit
which promoted the draft riots in New
York during the Civil war. The men
who made up those rioting mobs in
New York many years ago were the
'too proud to fight' type that is too
proud to go to war and fight. They
were not too proud to engage in dis-
graceful rioting."
Roosevelt denounced also "those
who had' spread stories to the effect
that the Women's Hughes tourists are
a silk-stocking crowd." He mentioned
Catherine Belmont Davis, Mrs. Ray-
mond Robins, Mary Antin, and as-
sociates, as typifying the "best type
of American womanhood, whose ca-
reers are sufficient refutation of any
charges of a silk-stocking variety, and
who, with very limited means, have
devoted their lives to the service of
mankind."
Prof. F. N. Scott To Lecture Thursday
Prof. F. N. Scott, head of the rhetoric
department, leaves today for Indian-
:polis where he will deliver an address
Thursday, before the Indiana State
Teachers' association on "American
Speech."

Lincoln J. Steffens, Journalist.
THREE CLASSES CHOOSE
HEADS FOR_ COMING YEAR
Soph Laves, Engineers, and Fresh
Architects Elected Officers
Yesterday
Three classes held their elections of
officers yesterday, soph laws and en-
gineers and fresh architects. The suc-
cessful candidates follow:
Soph laws--President, L. G. Field;
vice-president, Lee Joslyn; secretary,
E. D. Kirkby; treasurer, Samuel J.
Slavens; football mahager, Robert T.
Perry; basketball manager, Robert H.
Wilson; baseball manager, Lester E.
Waterbury; track manager, R. Harry
Leslie; oratorical delegate, C. E. Hut-
ton, and sergeant-at-arms, D. T. Mc-
Kone.
Soph engineers-President, R. D.
Smith; vice-president, R. L. Biggers;
secretary, E. M. Miller; treasurer, C.
F. Weaver; baseball manager, W. A.
Jaeger; basketball manager, H. H.
Horwitz; track manager, D. V. Bor-
land, and oratorical delegate, H. J.
Mack.
Fresh architects - President, E.
Bailey; vice-president, E. G. Schubert;
secretary, W. E. Campbell; treasurer,
Mrs. M. S. Underwood; sergeant-at-
arms, W. M. Osborn, and athletic man-
ager, G. P. Schafer.
J, A. Tillema was elected to repre-
sent the graduate classes in the stu-
dent council.
GREAT BRITAIN TO BORROW
\ $300,000,000 IN AMERICA
New York, Oct. 24.--Great Britain
will borrow $300,000,000 more in the
United States, according to informa-
tion in Wall street today. Details of
the loan were discussed in the house
of Morgan today, and it is understood
only a few finishing touches are re-
quired before formal announcement is
made. With this new loan the allies'
loans here will exceed one billion dol-
lars.
Prescott Club Holds First Meeting
The Prescott club, of the College of
Pharmacy, will hold its first meeting
at 7:30 o'clock this evening in room
303 chemistry and pharmacy building.
Dr. Stouffer of the University health
service will give a talk on "Sanitation
and its relation to the pharmacist."

ever haa prmnted.
Friday's Gargoyle will be the Syra-
cuse number and the cover design will
feature the game. The magazine will
be full of snappy jokes as Editor
Ralph E. Foltz has been busy clip-
ping all the old almanacs ever publish-
ed. The editorials will be directed on
campus customs, while the stories will
feature Michigan life in football sea-
son.
The cover design of the Gargoyle
will be printed in three colors, while
the advertising this year will present
a new feature, all the theatres in Ann
Arbor having printed the month's pro-
grams.
Y. W, G. A. SECURES
MANY NEW MEMBERS
Teams Report Enough Additional
Members to Bring Total Mem-
bersip Li to 601
The Y. W. C. A. last night received
the triumphant reports of 72 women
who have during the past week con-
ducted a quiet but thorough canvass of
the entire campus, and succeeded in
bringing the total membership up to
the high water mark of 601 active
members.
Newberry hall was the scene of a
real surprise party as girl after girl
came in, bringing her list of names to
swell the returns. The workers had
been organized in teams of nine girls
each and there was much interest as
to which team had secured the most
members. When the reports were in,
it was found that the team captained
by Helen Bush, '17, had made the high-
est record, 53, with a close second in
that of Helen Bourke, '18, which had
52 new members to its credit.
Clarissa Vyn, '18, chairman of the
membership committee, presented
white carnations to the captain of the
winning team and also to those work-
ers who had individually secured nine
or more members. These were as fol-
lows: Katherine Kilpatrick, '19; Helen
Robson, '17; Constance Winchell, '18;
Helen Bourke, '18; Ellen Stevenson,
'19; Edith Duemling, '18, and Mildred
Mighell, '18.
A general jubilation followed the
announcement of the returns. There
was real cause for the elation, for the
records show a phenomenal growth in
the membership of the association. It
is but two years ago that the Y. W. C.
A. could boast of only 250 names on
its roll, while last year the total
jumped to 453, and this year finds over
half of the women in the University
active members.
The campaign is to be extended un-
til Friday, for many women were not
at home when called on, and it is de-
sired that every womin the Univer-
sity be reached before the canvass is
declared finished.I
The following women have acted as
captains of the teams: Gladys Whelan,
'17; Helen Bourke, '18; Margaret Bird-
sell, '18; Helen Bush, '17; Ethel Vail,
'17; Mildred Mighell, '18; Leah Schuer-
en, '17, and Helen Brown, '18.
Normal Students-to Get Brown Degree
A new degree of Bachelor of Educa-
tion has been instituted at Brown
University in order to give those who
have a normal education an additional
two years of liberal study.

the student council is a good one,
and I sincerely hope it will be car-.
ied in good faith on the part of the
student body. Its merit is to be
measured by the extent to which
serious consideration is brought
to bear upon the issues in ques-
tion."

-PROF. JESSE S. REEVES,
of the Political Science
Department.
Tomorrow afternoon from 1 to 6
o'clock, all students of the University,
together with members of the faculty,
will be given an opportunity to in-
dicate their preference for any one of
the presidential candidates, as well as
to cast their vote upon the question of
state-wide prohibition for Michigan.
Inasmuch as the student body is re-
presentative of many diversely minded
sections of the country, the result of
the straw ballot promises to be in-
teresting, as indicating the general
choice of the country at large.
For the convenience of the voters, a
number of boxes will be installed in
prominent places on the campus, men
of the literary college being request-
ed to cast their votes at-the balloting
station to be provided in University
hall; law students, in the law building;
women of the literary college, in the
Library; architects and engineers, in
the engineering building; medical stu-
dents, in the medical building; dental
students, in the dental building, and
members of the College of Pharmacy,
in the chemistry and pharmacy build-
ing.
To facilitate the final count, women
will be given green ballots; men,
white, and faculty, pink. The results
of the balloting will be given in full
in the issue of The Daily for Friday
morning.
Harold E. O'Brien, '17, has been
chosen chairman of the committee in
charge, while representatives of the
engineering, architectural, law, medi-
cal, and dental depatrments have been
selected to act with him.
LAW SMOKER WEDNESDAYINOV. 8
To Start Series of Departmental Fung.
tions at Michigan Union
The first of a series of departmental
functions to be given this year under
the direction of the various depart-
ment vice-presidents of the Michigan
Union, will be held at the Union build-
ing Wednesday evening, Nov. 8, when
an all-law smoker will be given under
the direction of Law Vice-president
Kenneth Barnard, '17L. The commit-
tee in charge of the, smoker consists
of L. F. Moll, '17L, chairman; T. F.
McDonald, '17L; B. N. Sessions, '17L;
George Hurley, '18L, and Willis Nance,
'19L. A talk by a member of the
faculty and several musical numbers
will be given. An admission fee of 25
cents will be charged.

"I think the idea of a straw bal-
lot as projected by The Daily and

Prominent Places on
Campus

I

LINCOLN STEFFENS
On
What's Up in Mexico
of special interest to students of Sociology, Economics,
Political Science and History.

High School Auditorium 15c

Tonight at 8 o'clock

i

o

6L

" TODA

Y

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