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October 21, 1916 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-21

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.LC LI!

H

a

)usk"

With or
Johnson

The Arcade Sat.,

i

:i.

J

I

. some cities where shown it has
z brought back for the third and
th time and packed the house each
. In other places it was so dis-
:1 that if returned the ticket seller
Id go to sleep on her job. In the
ade Lobby this week people look-
at the announcement of this feat-
have expressed the most widely
rgent opinions. Two ladies came
One said, "Well if they ar6n't go-
to show 'The Light at Dusk' here
Saturday. For heaven's sake
HE BESTE

Mary, don't see it. I saw it in Toledo
yesterday, and I just hate such pic-
tures. I would much rather stay at
home and study math. or darn stock-
ings." Next came four fellows, who
also saw the announcement of "The
Light at Dusk." One of them, who
had seen the picture in Cleveland just
before coming to college, immediately
began to praise it in the most extrava-
gant terms and said he must see it
again and advised his companions to
do so without fail. He declared that
VER---A M

it was a powerful story with a thrill-
ing human appeal-one of the few
really good pictures gotten out this
year. And so it went, all the evening
-some condemning, some giving the
picture unstinted praise. The picture
critics likewise differ, some condemn-
ing it almost viciously, others seem-
ingly unable to say enough in its favor.
Some say that the admission should
be at least 25 cents while others de-
clare people should be paid to sit
through it.

WHAT IS. THE PICTURE ANYHOW?
And Who Wrote the Story?
Anthony P. Kelly is the author. He
wrote "THE GREAT DIVIDE" and
"THE SOUL OF A WOMAN," two un-
usually popular photoplays. "The
Light at Dusk" depicts the life of a
Russian tiller of the soil who comes to
America to seek a fortune. He meets
with wonderful success, but at the
sacrifice of all else that is really worth

while in life. Years afterward his
forsaken wife and daughter in Russia
and the daughter's husband come to
America and the latter secure work
in the great steel mills of the father
who in America has a new name. The
story deals with the great struggle of
the father in the amassing of an im-
mense fortune and his family being
brought to a realization that there is
something far more important in life
than /mere dollars and commercial
power. Whether you like it or not

you will find it a strong, human story
exceedingly well acted. If you don't
think it is worth a dime call at the
box office on your way out and get
your ten cents. If you think it is worth
a quarter, you can keep the extra fif-
teen cents.
REMEMBER-Clara Kimball Young
in "The Common Law," October 30-31.
Mary Pickford in her Big New F'a-
ture, "Less - Than The Dust" at The
Arcade soon.

ISERABLE FAILURE

That's the way the movie fans talk about this play

RULES~ O FRLD
: GRANT COLLEGES
Regulations Passed in Washington Af-
feet Only Schools Establish-
ed After 1862
DO NOT APPLY TO MICHIGAN
The regulations and instructions
passed by the conference of university
and college presidents and members o
the war department in Washington
Tuesday, were made primarily for
those educational institutions which
were given land grants by the federal
government in 1862, according "to
President Harry B. Hutchins, who re-
turned from the meeting Thursday.
The resolutions follow directly in the
wake of the recently passed National
Defense bill.
These land grant colleges, as they
are called, were established following
a federal grant of land in 1862. The
government grant carried with it
the obligation that the institutions re-
ceiving the property must have mil-
itary training. An example of this is
the University of Illinois, which al-
ways has and always will have military
training, if it wants to maintain its
title to the land given it by the gov-
ernment.
The University of Michigan, accord-
ing to the president, does not fall with-
in this class of institutions, for the
simple reason that it was founded in
1837, many years before the date on
which the government made its do-
nation. Neither are such instiutions
as Harvard, Yale, nor any other univer-
sities founded prior to 1862, land grant
colleges.
The committee that was appointed
by the war department is for the pur-
pose of studying problems connected
with non-military colleges, such as
Michigan. The opinion of the commit-
tee is that all actual drill and technic-
al work done by members of non-mil-
itary institutions should be done In the
summer military training camps, such
as Ptattsburg.
The president pointed out that the
University of Michigan now offers ap-
proximately 90 per cent of the theoret-
ical courses offered at West Point.
These courses are given for the most
part in the engineering college.
The essence of the resolutions pass-
ed by the Washington conference is
as follows:
1. Military training in non-military
colleges must be on a more elastic
procedure than in military institutions.
2. In institutions offering military
training, the professor of military sci-
ence and tactics and thre president of
the institution should be at liberty to
admit to the advanced courses any stu-
lent who, in their opinion, has had in-
struction equivalent to the preceding
courses.
3. That prescribed courses should
>e subect to modifications proposed by
he professor of military science and
:actics and the president of the institu-
ion and approved by the war de-
;artment.
4. Required military drill may be
aken in whole or in part in military
ummer camps.
The course of study to be mapped
ut by the war department, President
Rutchins says, is only for the land
,rant colleges, and does not affect oth-
r institutions. Of course voluntary

nilitary training among members of
he University, such as was held last
pring and is being organized at pres-
nt, is a matter wholly in the hands
>f the student body.
Dancing classes and private lessons
,t the Packard Academy. 18-tf
Do learn typewritins wel
eequires close applioatiot
A tvpewriter and free
instruction book from
).D.Morrill, 322 S. State,
will do the rest.

r n he Dog a " tear"al"ly pleaded or the life 'ape of oIficialdom, gave the neces-
I erei #VI eID oI of a little yellow dog. sary instructions, and within an hour
ola'ds the Stane She was Esther Smiley, of Maryland, the faithful playmate of Private Peter
sister of Private Peter Smiley, a re- Smiley was crated up ready for ship-
cruit in the United States marine ment to the marine corps recruit de-
Little Yellow Mongrel Sent to Recruit corps, and the dog she held in her arms pdt, Port Royal, S. C., where Peter is
Co'llowing Sister's had been Peter's playmate since youth. in training for the land and sea duties
Plea "Rover will surely die of grief unless of marines.
you send him on to my brother," the
Vin ! little girl sobbed. Football PlayerP ies From Blow
AWadhindtonr Oct. 20rt-Ponderoushedi

Y G+-li+"L 3, VU . 6 .T' l l iV l i
And wonder of wonders, the dignified
goernmental machinery stood stock generals understood the little girl's
still today while a 13 year old girl plea, and, acting instanter to preclude
stood before a group of dignified gen- the embalming of Rover in the red

Minneapolis, Oct. 20.-E. W. Wilson,
local semi-pro football player, is dead
as the result of a blow on the head
in a game last Sunday.

MAY BUCKLEY, AS "LUANA" I N "THE BIRD OF PARADISE."

AT THE THEATERS

TODAY
Majestic-Vaudeville-

Orpheum - Frank Keenan In
"HonorThy Name." Also Tri-
angle Comedy, DeWolf Hop-
per in "The Girl and the Mum-
my.
Arcade-Orrin Johnson in "The
Light at Dusk."
" * * I D * * F E
"THE BIRD OF PARADISE"

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
a

e

I

SO
S
T
Edi

I__.

URGES ALUMNUS OF BOTH IN.
STITUTIONS WHICH WILL JiEET
rODAY

DISPLAY SPORTSMANSHIP

itor The Michigan Daily

£i , lil liii liel iII! 11111111111111 1111 11111111111 11111111111111111111111111111i 111111 111111 l I II 1111111111 111
® THE_
OF THE -
lRom
-Regular Dinner 30c Short Orders
GOOD E -"TS - PLENTY OF IT

A keen rivalry has sprung up be-
tween Michigan's two big institutions
of learning, supplying a new element
to enrich the life of these colleges. It
holds much promise for the future if
handled in a friendly spirit.
The intense ardor of today's rivalry
may approach bitterness. Let every
loyal son bear in mind the tenets of
true sportsmanship.
AN ALUMNUS OF BOTH SCHOOLS.

The remarkable scenic effect in the
.ast or volcanic scene of Oliver Mor-
osco's "Bird of Paradise" production
has been the subject of much comment
and many questions.
Mr. Morosco, in arranging for the
Ataging of Mr. Tully's play, found the
vhole mechanical force of the com-
pany in despair of obtaining the effects

t

which author Tully demanded. They
ucceeded only in producing a volcano
if flapping canvas, highly apparent,
ed-painted incandescent globes and
wheezing windlasses. Efforts by invit-
ed and volunteer talent from without
produced results no more realistic.
Two nights before the production in
New York, Mr. Morosco set about get-
ting the desired effect. After an all
.iight session, experimenting with var-
ious appliances, he drew a set of plans
or the desired effect. At the final re-
hearsal Mr. Tully, the author, was sur-
prised to see a new volcano burst
through his third act, greatly improv-
ing and making strikingly realistic
the illusion in the tragic sacrifice of
Luana, which has since stimulated in-
terest in the closing scene.
The presentation of this compelling
drama is announced at the Whitney
Theatre on Monday, Oct. 23.

WE
I
W.
m0
Na
ge(

a

ell Known Southern Surgeon Dies
Richmond, Va., Oct. 20.-Dr. Cbarle:
P. Brock, 81 years old, one of the
'st widely known surgeons of the
uth and a former president of the
tional Association of Railway Sur-
ons, died here today.

University
MAYNARD STREET

School

of Music

ANN ARBOR

Courses

under

Expert

Instructors in

Singing - Piano - Organ -

'Violin - Violoncello - Viola - Harp - Band Instruments
History - Harmony - Public School Music. etc.

DR. ALBERT A. STANLEY, Director

BYRL FOX BACHER, Dean of Women

I

ALBERT LOCKWOOD, Head of Piano Department
THEODORE HARRISON, Head of Vocal Department

SAMUEL PIERSON LOCKWOOD, Head of Violin Department
EARL VINCENT MOORE, Head of Organ Department

-THE HOLCAD' HAS SOME CON.
CLU9iON ON THE STRUGGLE

I

Continued from page three
son on a varsity eleven. Also, McClel-
lan, Springer, Fick, and Brown, the
"first aid" set of backs, are all ex-
perienced men. So you can look for
Sommer's backfield to go into that
game at Ann Arbor and give a mighty
good account of itself, so good, in fact,
that now, with all the injured ones
back in the game, there is no reason
why the Aggies should not be a good
even money bet to beat Michigan on
the afternoon of October 21."
U.

Matie P. Cornwell
Instructor in Drawing
Alice Evans
Instructor in Physical Culture
Mel Gillespie
Instructor in Guitar, Banjo and Mandolin
Frances L. Hamilton
Instructor in Piano
Nora C. Runt
Instructor in Singing
Mrs. Anna Schram-Imig
Instructor in Singing
Ada Grace Johnson
Instructor in Singing

Lucile Johnson
Instructor in Harp
Maude C. Kleyn
Instructor in Singing
Edith Byrl Koon
Instructor in Piano
Martha Merkle
Instructor in Piano

Helen A. Showerman
Instructor in Piano
Otto J. Stahl
Instructor in Piano and Theory
Harrison A. Stevens
Instructor in Piano
Nell B. Stockwell
Instructor in Piano
Kenneth N. Westerman
Instructor in Singing
Anthony J. Whitmire
Instructor in Violin
Wilfred Wilson
Instructor in Wind Instruments
Marion Olive Wood
Instructor in Physical Culture

Lee Norton Parker
Instructor in 'Cello
Florence B. Potter
Instructor in Public;
Mrs. fable Ross-Rbead
Instructor in Piano

School Music

For Catalogue or for Special Information Please Call at the Office or Address

CHARLES A. SINK, Secretary

PINK
EXTRA
TODAY

Students may elect regular courses leading to graduation or they may elect some
one special subject.

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