100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 02, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-06-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
COLD AND CLOUDY
TODAY

r lJ~lr iau

:43 at t Hi

UNITED PRE,
DAY AN) NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE1

I

VOL. XXVII. No. 175. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 1917. PRICE FIVE

FRANCE DISFAVORS
PEACE CONFERENCE

Tighten Net on
Anti-Draft Crowd

PKJRMIC STUDENTS TO PAY
FINAL TRIBUTE TO DEAN

French Premier Ribot States Attitude
of Government on Socialist
Stockholm Meeting
INSIST ON PEACE MADE BY
PEOPLE, NOT ONE *PARTY
England Decides to Send Delegates to
Petrograd to Confer with
Russian Leaders
By W. S. Forrest
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Paris, June .- France insists that
there be no peace except that which
all her people shall make. The govern-
ment will not recognize the efforts of
any single party to arrange a success-
ful termination of the war.
Premier Ribot, so declared in the
chambe r of deputies today, answer-
ing socialists as to the government's
attitude on the international socialist
"peace" conference at Stockholm.
Ribot announced amid tremendous
cheering that France will shortly pub-
lish all secret treaties between Russia
and France-thus acquiescing to the
request of the Russian socialists.
Strikes Due to Labor Conditions
"We have no reason to doubt the
patriotism of the Russian govern-
ment," the premier asserted emphati-
cally. 't'urning to the present situa-
tion in France, Ribot declared that the
strikes now on were due solely to
labor and economic conditions, and
were in no way connected with the,
war.
England to Send Delegation
London, June 1.-England has de-
cided to send delegates to Petrograd to
confer with Russian socialists. This
committee is to stop at Stockholwn
enroute for possible consultation with
other socialists called by the Russian
and international peace conference.
SOPHOMORE ENGINEERS ELECT
R. I). SITI FOR C4UNCILMAN

Washington Center of Opposition Prop-
aganda; Make Several
Arrests
By Carl D. Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, June 1.-Steps for the
holding in of leaders of nation-wide
antiregistration propaganda were cen-
tered here today in the shadow of the
capitol dome.
Actual headquarters of ultra-social-
ists and anarchists are in New York
state, but devious propaganda trails
led to Washington. Two propagand-
ists were under the closest guard by
government agents.
Both secret service operators and
agents are working with redoubled
vigor to crush the menace before next
week.
William J. Flynn, chief of the secret
service, came here today from New
York personally to superintend the
work.. No officials of the department
of justice today would say why ar-
rests were made.
Attorney General Gregory issued a
call asking registration vigilance com-
mittees to be formed in every com-
munity. It is believed that such com-
mittees can do the effective work done
by vigilance committees in past crises
in the history of the nation.
FIRST ACTUAL DRAFT
PROBABLY ON SEPT. 5
WILL MAKE ADEQUATE PROVIS-
IONS FOR SUPPLIES BE-
FORE CALLING MEN

MIEMBERS OF THE COLLEGE OF
PHARMACY TO ATTEND FU-
NERAL IN BODY
Funeral services for Dean Julius
Otto Schlotterbeck of the College of
Pharmacy, whose death resulted
Thursday night after a long illness
with stomach trouble, will be held to-
morrow afternoon at 3:30 o'clock at
the residence, 1907 Washtenaw ave-
nue. Students of the College of
Pharmacy will meet in front of the
Chemistry building at 3 o'clock and at-
tend the services in a body.
For 25 years Dean Schlotterbeck
was connected with the University as
instructor in pharmacognosy and bot-
any, as junior professor, and then as
dean of the College of Pharmacy.
He was born in Ann Arbor on Sept.
1, 1865. He was the son of Herman
William and Rosina Christina
(Kempf) Schlotterbeck. Both his par-
ental and maternal ancestors were
German.
Received Education in Ann Arbor
Having received his primary educa-
tion in the various grade schools of
Ann Arbor, he served for some time as
a prescription clerk in a local drug
store. In 1887 he graduated from the
College of Pharmacy of the University.
and a year later became assistant in
pharmacognosy and pharmacy.
. At the same time Dean Schlotter-
beck was studying for the degree of
Bachelor of Science in chemistry,
which was conferred upon him in 1891.
In 1892 he was appointed to an in-
structorship in pharmacognosy and
botany, an office which he held until
1895. The following year he spent
studying in the University of Berne,{
Switzerland, where he received the de-
gree of Doctor of Philosophy.
Returning to Ann Arbor, he became
assistant professor of pharmacognosy
acrd botany, and in 1904 he was ad-
vanced to the rank of junior professor.
In 1905 he was made dean of the Col-
lege of Pharmacy.
Contributed to Scientific Magazines
Dean Schlotterbeck was a frequent
contributor to many scientific mag-
azines and journals, and was the dis-
coverer of several new and valuable1
vegetable compounds. Among some1
of his most recent writings are: "The
Alkaloids of Adlumia Cirrhosa," "Con-
tribution to the Chemistry of Chelidon-
ne," "The Development and Structure1
of the Seed of the Argemone Mexi-
cana," "Chelidoxanthin as Impurer
Berberine," and "Vanilla Extract."
He was a member of the Americanf
association for the advancement of
Science, the American Pharmaceuticalt
association, the Michigan Pharmaceu-
tical association, and the American1
conference of Pharmaceutical Facul-
ties.

Wlasts Disturb
City 's Silence
Fierce Cannonading Shakes Windows;
Rumors of German Invasion
Startle campus
Ann Arbor lay a-sleeping in the
June day's smiling sun. :The shaded
walks invited from the glare. When
-Hark! Was that the rumble of some
distant giant gun? The growling of
the War Dogs in their lair?
What periodic thunder so disturbs
the atmosphere, and startles campus
couples from their bliss? It is more

TO FORM FOURTH
AMBULANCE UNIT
All men who are interested
in the ambulance service but
were unable to obtain places in
the first three units may have
an opportunity to enter a fourth.
Applicants should leave their
summer addresses at the Union
immediately in case a summons
should be necessary.
The prospective unit will be
organized on the same principle
as the former three and will
serve in the same capacity.

Following a talk on the "Engineer
of the Future," by Prof. John R. Allen,
before the sophomore engineer assem-
bly held last Thursday, the members
of the class attended to elections and
business matters. R. D. Smith was
elected student councilman for the en-
suing year, while John Herllhy was
chosen as captain of the regatta
canoe crew.
Adiscussion of the annual Pow-wow
resulted in a resolution that the affair
be abandoned this year owing to con-
flicting eventstand present war con-
ditions.
Theclass also expressed its appre-
ciation of the efforts of its retiring
president, R. D. Smith and presented
him with a gavel.
PRES. FARRAND OF COLORADO
SAYS U. S. IN FOR LONG WAR
Boulder, Col;, June 1.- President
Livingston Farrand of the University
of Colorado, who is to deliver the com-
mencement address at Michigan on
June 28, is of the opinion that it will
take three, five, or ten years for the
United States to accomplish the down-
fall of autocracy, according to the Sil-
ver and Gold.
Dr. Farrand further states that the
submarine menace cannot be success-
fully coped with for at least 10
months.
ITALIANS REPULSE COUNTER
ATTACK MADE BY AUSTRIANS
Rome, June 1.-A massed counter at-
tack thrown in force, against newly
won Italian positions on heights No.
592 and No. 652- in the Vodice sector
was thrown back and completely re-
pulsed, the Italian war office asserted
today. Heavy losses were inflicted on
the enemy. In the north near Carso
and around Garizia considerable fight-
ing activity was reported.

By Robert J. Bender
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington. June 1.-The first ac-
tual draft of America's citizen soldiery
will probably be Sept. 5. According
to present indications it will take that
long to prepare supplies, and to pre-
pare proper housing and equipment for
the first 500,000- men.
Every step is being taken with de-
liberation and care in order to reduce
to a minimum the possibility of mis-
takes. It is not the government's pur-
pose to get thousands of young men
into camp without every means at
hand to properly care for them, and
to equip and prepare them for service.
Bound to Be Mistakes
By the very nature of the war situa-
tion there is bound to be actions, which
appear at first to be clumsy and un-
wieldy. This officials expect in the
handling of America's part in the war,
but it is confidently stated that soon
the ground work of the structure will
be laid, and America's speed and thor-
oughness will begin to show itself in
rapid confirmation of the , work it
faces. In the meantime, it is claimed,
that a tremendous amount more than
shows on the surface is now being ac-
complished.
Bank Burglar Falls; Kills Self
St. Louis, June 1.-Failing in an at-
tempt to hold up the Kings State bank
at University station here by bluffing
the teller with what he declared was a
bottle of nitroglycerine, Franklin J.
Whitman shot and killed himself in the
bank today. Whitman had been a
lyceum quartet singer and was inter-
ested in the manufacture of aeroplanes
here at the present time.

than far-off thunder that is filling
them with fear. Was-that-a flying
shell we just heard hiss?
Hear the windows rattle! Feel the
quaking of the ground, atevery repeti-
tion of the blast! Do German emis-
saries cause this very martial sound?
Have Teutons come to Michigan at
last?
Place no dreadful meaning 'pon 9ach
loud reverberation, that shatters all
the beauty of the day. No alien foe
thus terrifies Ann Arbor's population.
They're blasting roads along the Ypsi
way.
LIBERTY BOND SALE STARTS
IN ANN ARBOR MONDAY
LOAN IS SOLE CONCERN OF MAR.
KET IN NEW YORK SAYS
REPORT
Ann Arbor's campaign for the sale
of the Liberty loan bonds will com-'
mence next Monday. In Chicago,
New York, Philadelphia, and all
of the larige cities great campaigns are
being conducted to aid the sale of the
bonds. Through channels of the
newspapers, public speeches, and gen-
eral canvasses, the end is slowly be-'
ing secured.
According to a report from one of
the biggest brokerage firms in New
York City the Liberty loan has beenj
the sole concern of the bond market
throughout the present month, every-
thing being made subservient to its
success. Intelligent and organized ef-
fort is being made to reach the most
humble investor and committees are1
vieing with each other to turn in big
subscriptions.
The placing of the loan is not as
easy a matter as it appears on the1
surface, say experienced financiers. In
the first place only one in 500 of our
population is accustomed to buying
bonds of any description. In the sec-
ond place, the United States govern-3
ment bonds have never been popular
because of their low yield.
Europeans have long been used to
high taxes. The people of the United
States have not, and it is but natural
that the heads of the family and of
different businesses should be figuring
what the bonds will bring in dollars
and cents. Then the bonds represent
what is normally invested in a whole
year by the American people..
Notwithstanding these obstacles, the
campaign which is now being pushedf
in every part of the country is bearing
excellent fruit, and if the subscriptions
continue to pour in at the present rate,'
their total will be most satisfactory.

University Drill
is Aid in Camps
Men Rise at 5 O'clock in the Morning,
Retiring at 10 O'clock After
Day's Work
A number of interesting letters from
students of the Law school, who are
now in camp at Fort Sheridan, have
been received by friends of the "rook-
les" in Ann Arbor. The men are all
enthusiastic about their new life, and
say the preliminary training gained
before leaving the University has been
of great value to them.
The work they say is interesting, al-
though no labor union would approve
of the hours the men must put in.
They rise at 5 o'clock in the morning
and are kept on duty until 10 o'clock
in the evening, having 30 minutes for
breakfast, one hour for dinner, and
an hour and a half for supper. Sat-
urday afternoons and Sundays belong
to the soldier. The period between 7
and 9:30 o'clock is reserved for study.
The men are handicapped in this, how-
ever, by the fact that they have no
tables and poor light.'
At present the work consists of
squad and company drills, manual of
arms and the bayonet, semaphore and
code signalling, classes in guard duty,
martial law, and rules of land war-
fare.
There is a good chance to make in-
teresting acquaintances at the camp.
There are men there from almost all
the universities in the country, and
college men seem to have a special in-
terest in each other. Some of them
have seen service in the trenches. One
man with whom the Michigan men
have had close contact, fought in the
trenches in France. He was a mem-
ber of the famous Princess Patricia
regiment, of which about 30 men sur-
vive. He carries a scar on his fore-
head which was inflicted by a German
rifle in a hand-to-hand fight. All the
men have had to be inocculated for
typhoid fever.
JAPAN WILL SEND
TROOPS IF NEEDED'
To Furnish Soldiers If Emergency
Arises; Now Supplying
Ammunition'
Washington, June 1.-Japan will
send troops to the Russian front or
to Europe "if an emergency arises,
making such a course advisable,"
Augusto Ciuselli, member of the Ital-
ian war commission, said today. The,
declaration bears out a recent United
Press dispatch based on authoritative
information obtained here in diplo-
matic circles.
"There are no Japanese troops fight-
ing with the allies now," said Ciuselli,
"because all Europe except France
has sufficient man-power. What is
most needed -is ammunition. Japan
has been supplying large amounts of;
this necessity." A shortage of ships,!
Ciuselli said, is another reason why1
Japanese troops have not been sent to
the allies' lines.1

r
BOAT CLUB STAGE---
BIG CANIVATOD
Entrants in Events to Pay Fee
Judges' Stand Before
Contests
ELABORATE PRIZES TO BE
GIVEN TO WINNERS OF a
est Decorated Canoe Will Rece
Thermos Bottle; Paddle
for Second
Plans for one of the largest w
carnivals in the history of Michi
water sports have been completedt
weathdr permitting will be carried
execution at 2 o'clock this aftern
on the Huron river when the Uniy
sity of Michigan Boat club will si
its fifth annual regatta.'
The entrants are to meet at
stand of the judges on the shor
the-river and there pay the 25 C,
for admission, to the events. A
motor has been secured from the
troit Edison company as safety eqv
ment.
The judges for the ocason wil
Homer Heath. D. G. A. May,a
Glenn Coulter, '18L. John Maulbet
'17P, and Stephen Attwood, '8E,=
act as starters. H. A. Knowson,'1
will be clerk of the course, ad I4
Brazell '18E, and Robert Ben~tet
will be the announcers.
Elaborate Prizes for Winners
A large number of elaborate Pr,
have been donated. For the 25-
race a marathon cup has been dca
by the Detroit Edison company.
first prize for fancy diving will
given by the U. of M. Boat club."
club will also give medals to t e w
ner of each event, as well as sec
and third prizes in each event. At
for the highest point winner in b
divisions will be given by the b1
club.
The first prize for the best decoias
canoe will be a thermos bottle and
second prize a canoe paddle, both
nated by the Saunder canoe liv
'First prize in the canoe sailing ev
will be a mahogany back rest, Ai
donated by the canoe livery, and1
second prize will be a canoe PA 01
by Tinker & Co.
Prizes Will Be Displayed at Rust%
Parking of autos on the boulev
has been arranged for, and canoes iq
occupy satisfactory positions i
river. The prizes will be annourm
at the end of the regatta, but will
be awarded until after they have b
on display at Huston's. Fires will
be permitted on the boulevard.
ARMOUR TO BUID $2,00,000
FOOD STORAGE IN NEW YOI
New 'York, June 1.-Armour a
company will build a food wareho
to cost $2,000,000 on the block bou
ed by Tenth and Eleventh aveu
Fourteenth and Fifteenth streets.
Ambulance Unit Drills batr10Ind
Ambulance units A, B, and C w.
meet at the Union this morning at
o'clck. Members of the three si
are advised to wear comfortable she
and old clothes as there will probat
be a short country hike included
the morning's program.
Women May Attend Training Ca
Denver, Col., June 1.-WomenNN
have an opportunity to attend t
tional training camps as a milita

camp for women will be conducted
Loretto Heights, beginning July 7.
will be open to American girls m
than 18 years old.
Alumni Nurses Meet Next Tues<
The alumni of the Nurses' Train
school will hold a meting at 2 o'clo
next Tuesday afternoon at the Nurs
home, 1005 North University stre
A business meeting will' be follow
by a social hour.

During the years 1912-14 when he
was east of leave of absence, Dean
Schlotterbeck was connected with the
Jay Hungerford Smith ('77P) company
or Rochester, N. Y., manufacturers of
soda fountain requisites. On his re-
turn to Ann Arbor in 1914 he assum-
ed the duties of the office which he
held until his death.
Many Relatives Survive
On Aug. 11, 1898, he was married to
Eda May Clark, '91-'97, of Ann Arbor,
who survives him, along with two sis-
ters, Mrs. Ida Golder of Cincinnati,
Miss Otilia Schlotterbeck of Cincinnati,
two brothers, Mr. Emil Schlotterbeck
of New York.. City, and Mr. Gustave
Schlotterbeck of Cincinnati, and three
children, Prescott Golder Schlotter-
beck, '20, Karl Theodore Schlotter-,
beck, and Miriam Arda.
Colorado Leads Preparedness States
Boulder, Col., June 1.-"Colorado is
four weeks ahead of any other state
in the Union in war preparedness,"
said Mr. H. W. Cornell, secretary of
the state ways and means committee,
according to the Silver and Gold. All
conservation plans have been complet-
ed and are being put into effect.

FIRST LINER FROM HOLLAND
SINCE JAN. 23 REACHES U.

S.

Alumnus Makes Special Senior Rates
Special rates have been made this
year on subscriptions to the Mich-
igan Alumnus. Seniors may obtain
the official alumni journal for one year
for $1 or for three years for $4.
This offers an unusual opportunity
to members of the graduating class-
es to keep in touch with the University
at a remarkably low cost.

New York, June 1.-The first liner
from Holland since Jan. 23 has ar-
rived at an Atlantic port with 223
first, 341 second, and 9740 third class
passengers, via Halifax, where it was
detained two days for examination.
There were 119 Americans among
the passengers, of whom 72 were sur-
vivors of submarine sinkings in the
North sea and the English channel.

Huron River
Above
Boat House
Admission
Free!

Swimming

Features

Canoeing

TODAY!

U. of M.

BOAT CLUB

REGATTA

Starting

at

Fifth Anwual Carnival

2 o'cloCl

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan