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May 31, 1917 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-31

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F'HE WEATHER
UNSETTLE~D-PROB-
ABLY RAIN TODAY

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UNITED P1
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VOL. XXVII. No. 173. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 31, 1917. PRICE FIVE CE

GOVERNMENT STILL
*HOPES TO CRUSH
ANTI-WAR PLOTS

Troops Stop Riot
In Last St. Louis

Five Infantry Companies and
Cavalry Troops Patrol Sec.
tion of City

One

FEDERAL AND STATE
ON TRAIL OF RIOT
TERS

OFFICERS
PLOT-

LUMBERMEN FLEE TO
ESCAPE REGISTRATION
Minneapolis Socialist Leaguers Decide
Not to Register and Take Con-
sequences
By Carl .. Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, May 30.-The govern
ment today hoped it had crushed anti-
conscription plots.
Officials are not positive, however,
that this is the case. Riots like those
of Civil war days were still regarded
possible, so that the hand of the go-
ernment is rounding up plotters in ad-
vance and appears to have killed the
work of propogandists partly at
least.
Officials on Watch
Federal agents, United States Mar-
shall, local police and city patriotic
orders are at work over the entire na-
tion to turn up men who would thwart
American war plans. They will con-
tinue their task until registration day
next Tuesday, and if necessary nation-
al guardsmen will be called into ser-
vice to quell disorder.
Trail Leads to Pro-German Quarters
The government investigating trail
led today in many instances to pro-
German quarters. The thoroughness
of the entire registration propoganda
convinced authorities here that it was
largely a pre-conceived program of
Tuetonic agents. In any event the per-
petrators thereof will be punished to
the fullest extent of the sedition law,
or if the new spy bill passes, the cases
will be punished under that measure.
Lumber Men Flee to Escape Draft
St. Paul, Minn., May 30.-Evidence
that lumber jacks and logging men
are fleeing into forests of northern
Minnesota to escape registration was
seen today in a report from State
Forester Cox, who was sent into Min-
nesota woods to investigate plot
charges.
Every precaution to prevent concert-
ed opposition to draft registration in
lumber camps is being taken by the
state public safety commission in its
secret session.
Refuse to Register
Minneapolis, May 30.- Members of
the young peoples socialist league in
Minneapolis today announced that they
would not register next Tuesday, and
would take the consequences if federal
officials want to prosecute them.
TEXAS MAIL CARRIER CHARGED
WITH THREAT TO KILL WILSON
Dallas, Texas, May 30.-W. A. Berg-
feld, Hastell, Tex., mail carrier, was
arrested here today charged with
threatening to take the life of Presi-
dent Wilson. Bergfeld was accorded
an immediate hearing before United
States Commissioner May, who set his
bond at, $10,000.
NATIVES OF ALLIED NATIONS
IN FRANCE MAY BE CALLED
Paris, May 30.-The government to-
day introduced a bill in the chamber
of deputies to compel natives of allied
countries now residing in France, to
enter military or naval service.
Gymnastic Field Meet at Riverview
Chicago, May 30.-The International
Gymnastic union's track and field
meet will be held at Riverview park
on June 3 under the auspices of the
Danish-American Athletic club.

St. Louis, May 30.-East St. Louis
today was virtually under martial law.
Five infantry companies of the Fourth
Illinois national guard, and one cav-
alry troop patroled the down town sec-
tion and the negro section and plants
where negroes are employed.
Citizens continued today to protest
the importation of iegroes from the
South and it is thought that the mayor
will take some official action. A ma-
jority of the negroes imported have
departed. Lieutenant-Colonel Crayton,
commander of the troops, and Mayor
Mallmon announced today that the
situation was under controldand that
further rioting is not feared.
ANNUAL DILY-GARGOYLE
FRAY ENDS IN DELUGE
CONTEST CALLED IN SITH; RE-
PORTERS PROVE GOOD
MARATHONERS
Vindication and revenge are The
Daily's.
For the personal edification of those
Gargollans who so far forgot them-
selves yesterday, and who neglected to
come out to south Ferry field, it may
be said here and now that The Daily
mauled and kicked the alleged funny
guys all over the lot. The mauling-
score if you wish-was 32-10.
But six innings of the scheduled
nine were, played. Both sides were
perfectly willing to call it quits at the
hour of noon, so quits it was. Glenn
M. Coulter, '18L, president of the
Union, also was perfectly willing to
state that it was a day.
The honor of The Daily was well
upheld by H. C. L. Jackson, the man-
aging editor, who refused to allow a
hit for the first quartet of innings.
buring these rounds, the infield of this
publication worked like a set of pro-
fessionals.
In 'passing out the checks for laud-
able work the whole Daily team looked
well. But the work of Wehmeyer
Clark, Schermerhorn, and Carey as the
infield must not be overlooked.
Schermerhorn went back of second for
a hard hit bal, and after making a
hair-raising stop, got his man at first
by a perfect heave.
Long distance clouting by the win-
ners brought the total up to 16-0 at
the end of the second. Folz was using
his own invention of the bean ball
about this time in an unsuccessful at-
tempt to ward off clouts.
The rest of the contest was more o
less of a slaughter of the same order
until Fitzgerald had to go and violate
inviolable tradition and q'ustom by
pitching for Folz.
Fitz whiffed a row of Daily substi-
tutes in order in the last of the sixth.
The Gargoyle attempted to stage a
rally at the expense of the tiring
Jackson, but succeeded in amassing
but six runs.
Shoenfield, who played right field
for the Gargoyle, was the real scintil-
lator of the contest from the losers'
(Continued on Page Six.)
ABANDON BRASS POWDER CITP
TO AVERT NAVAL ACCIDENTS
Washington, May 30.-To make im-
possible a repetition of the recent ac-
cident on the Mongolia, in which two
Red Cross nurses were killed, the
brass type of powder cups used in Am-
erican naval guns is to be abandoned
for wood or fiber substitutes.
ated the naval guard on the Mongolia
The investigating board has exoner-
and attributes the accident to an un-

explainable defection at right angles
of a portion of a brass powder cup.

SENATE HAPLAIN
AT MSSEETING
Rev. George L. Cady of Lansing Will
Be Main Speaker at Pre-regis-
tration Exercise
MILITARY ORGANIZATIONS TO
PARADE CITY IN UNIFORMS
Registrar Hall to Explain to Men De..
tails of Registration and
Exemptions
The Rev. George L. Cady of Lan-
sing, chaplain of the Michigan state
senate, will be the principal speaker
at the patriotic mass meeting in Hill
auditorium next Monday evening for
the University students and Ann Ar-
bor men who will register on June 5
for the selective draft. Details for the
event were arranged at a conference
of the committee in charge of the
meeting at the Union at Tuesday noon.
Parade Before Meeting
A patriotic parade of all military
organizations in the city will be a fea-
ture of the meeting. Music will be
furnished by Otto's Knights Templar
band and the Varsity band. Earle B.
Moore and Charles A. Sink of the
School of Music will have charge of
the musical part of the program.
The ground floor will be reserved for
all those who are to register Tuesday,
and the galleries will be open to the
general public. It is estimated that
there are 2,000 men of registration age
in the city.
Registration Explained
George J. Burke, former prosecut-
ing attorney. will preside at the meet-
ing. Rev. N. C. Fetter will offer prayer
at the opening of the exercises. Reg-
istrar Arthur G. Hall will explain th
details of the registration and the
method of procedure. Registrar Hall
is the official registrar of this precinct
and is in close touch with the rules
of registration.
The committee in charge of arrange-
ments for the patriotic mass meeting
consists of Messrs. R. A. Campbell, L.
C. Douglas, H. J. Abbott, Registrar A.
G. Hall, and Dr. T. S. Langford. The
sub-committees are as follows: Pa-
rade, Colonel A. C. Pack, Major C. W.
Castle, S. W. Millard, Chris Donnelly,
and B. F. Savery; speakers, L. C.
Douglas, H. J. Abbott, and Registrar
A. G. Hall; music, C. A. Sink, Erwin
E. Schmid, and L. D. Wines; publicity
and printing, H. L. C. Jackson, '18, H.
H. Johnson, and D. W. Springer. Ush-
ers and decorations, W. C. Hollands, L.
H. Flook, and William Schultz.
VILLA TAKES TOWN
Force Under "Chico" Cano Captures
City Near Border
El Paso, Tex., May 30.-A Vilista
force under "Chico" Cano today cap-
tured the Mexican town of Ojinada op-
posite Presidio,- Texas, after a battle
with Carranzaistas lasting several
hours, according to information which
reached military headquarters here.
Bullets fell into the American town
of Presidio, but so far as could be
learned no Americans were injured,
the report said. Villa is headed for
the captured city where it is said he
will establish his headquarters. The
Carranza defenders are fleeing to
Jiminez.
Chicago Boys to Farm in Michigan
Chicago, May 30.-Agricultural camp
No. 1 for high school boy volunteers

has been opened near Frankfort, Mich.,
by 10 boys who have been taking man-
ual training in Chicago's public
schools. Ninety boys will leave for
the camp within 10 days.
Evanston Celebrates with Pageant
Chicago, May 30.-A pageant sym-
bolic of the past, present, and future
was held in Evanston this morning in
celebration of Memorial day.

Hu Socialists A rrive for Peace
Conference Called by Scheidemann

Copenhagen, May 30.-The German
socialist delegation en route to the
Stockholm "peace conference" called
by the German socialist leaders, ar-
rived here today.
Philip Scheidemann, the German ma-
jority socialist leader, who was mainly
instrumental in calling the Stockholm'
meeting, has been here for a number
of days, holding conferences with
Swiss internationalists.
"The decision of the French social-
ists to attend the Stockholm confer-
ence will bring British socialists," de-
clared Scheidemann.

Other German socialists thought
peace would come when the belliger-
ent governments were forced by suf-
ferings of the masses to follow Rus-
sia's example. The German socialists
all declared Russia's plan of democ-
racy was what they sought in the cen-
tral empires.
The German socialists' view is that
they are ready for "peace without an-
nexations."
Delegate Molkenbuhr declared that
Germany and Alsace Lorraine were so
intimately connected that a separa-
tion was impossible.

DECRATION DAY
SIEKERS UPHOLD
PRESIDENT HARRY B. HUTCHIN
REVIEWS ENTRANCE
INTO WAR
CIVIL WAR VETERAN
RECALLS DAYS OF '6
Presents History of Michigan's So
diers In Rebellion; Sing
National Airs

WILSON SSERTS TRUST
IN LOYALTY OF NATION
PRESIDENT DECLARES MANHOODI
OF COUNTRY WILL RESPOND
TO CRISIS
Washington, May 30. - Asserting
confidence in the loyalty of the nation,
President Wilson this afternoon de-
clared its manhood will respond to this1
crisis "with results that will hold the
attention of all mankind."
The president spoke at the annual
Arlington cemetery Decoration day
services. Paying tribute to the na-
tion's dead, the president said, "I envy
them because of their great work for
liberty accomplished; while we are in
the midst of work unfinished, theirs
has already been tested. Men who
died to preserve the union also gave,
their lives to preserve the instrument
which we offer the world today."
Fight for Human Liberty
"The liberty of the nation de-
scended in the Civil war is not a sel-
fish liberty," the president said. "We
join with other nations to fight for
the cause of human liberty, which we
have an opportunity to vindicate with;
our blood and treasures. With the
help of God, America will show that
she was born to serve mankind."
Mrs. Wilson was with the president.
NEXT YEAR OFFICERS
FOR VEREIN ELECTED
German Honorary Society Choses
Leaders for Both Upper and
Lower Sections
Officers for next year were elected
by the Deutscher Verein at its last
meeting of the semester held last
Tuesday night in the society's rooms.
The officers for the general Verein
are: Waldemar F. Schreiber, '18,
president; Ruth Bailey, '18, vice-presi-
dent; Anna von Walthausen, '18, sec-
retary; Egon Mallick, '18, terasurer;
Ralph Gault, '19, auditor.
The officers for the women's sec-
tion are: Marie von Walthausen, '18,
president; Mildred S. Schilling, '18,
vice-president; Hulda Stroeber, '18,
secretary; Alice Woessner, '18, treas-
urer; Milda Josenhaus, '18, second
vice-president.
. The officers for the men's section
are: Lawrence Goldsmith, '19, pres-
ident; Karl Ritscher, eng. spec., vice-
president; Erich Walter, '19; secre-
tary-treasurer.
The social program consisted of a
musical selection by Florence Pad-
dock, '17, and Robert J. McCandliss,
'18, assisted by Emily Powell, '19.
Karl Ritscher, eng. spec., and Dyme
Badenstab, '20, were called on for
speeches.
Montana to Farm Lands with Convicts
Helena, Mont., May 30.-The Ana-
conda Copper Mining company has
made the state of Montana a gift of
the use of 2:000 acres or more of land
for the year upon which to raise all
the garden and other crops needed by
the state prison, insane asylum, and
tuberculosis sanatorium.

ITALIARS MIX BLOWS
WITH AUSTRIAN TROOPS

GENERAL CADORNA SHIFTS
RECTION OF BLOW TO
NORTH'

DI-

By John H."Hurley
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Rome, May 30.-Like a skillful
boxer who has already achieved a1
"shade," the Italian army today was
"mixing its blows" against the Aus-
trians on the southern front.
By all the rules of the game Gen-
eral Cadorna might have been expect-,
ed to follow up his brilliant success,
around Duino Monday by further bat-
tering there. Instead, he is now mak-
ing a bold shift of the direction of his
blow-striking against the enemy posi-
tion far to the north of Duino.y ,
Expect Brilliant Victory
North of the Gorizia front, dis-
patches declared, furious fighting is in,
vogue and a brilliant victory for the
Italians is expected through the turn-
ing of the flank position.
Hill No. 52, a tremendously strong
position, was taken and held against
a succession of counter attacks. In
the meantime it was reported that
General Cadorna was bringing up
heavy guns for a renewed assault
along the coast lines toward Duino and
Trieste. Along this front today the
counter-attack was furious.
Report Extension of Lines
Rome, May 30.-. "By a local offens-
ive between Jamiano and the coast we
extended our lines to the west of
Nedeazza," declared the official war.
office report today.
Boxer Ruins in China to Be Rebuilt
Tientsin,. China, May 30.-Admiral
Cheng Pi Kuang, the minister of the
navy, has revived thesubject of re-
building the Taku forts, which were
destroyed by the allies' forces during
the Boxer trouble in 1900. Under the
protocol of 1901 immediately follow-
ing the Boxer trouble China is forbid-
den to fortify the mouth of the Peiho.
Easterner to Build Chinese Hospitals
Baltimore, May 30.-B. Frank Ben-
nett, a Baltimore builder, will leave
here next month for China, where he
has been commissioned by the Rocke-
feller foundation to build two hospitals
at a cost of $3,000,000.
16 Still Missing in Ruins of Mattoon
Mattoon, Ill., May 30.-Mattoon is
searching in the ruins of its storm-
wrecked homes for the bodies of 16
persons missing and believed dead.
Everyone in Charleston has been ac-
counted for.
Chicago Alumni to Raise War Funds
Chicago, May 30.-The alumni of the
University of Chicago at their reunion
June 9 will turn their energies toward
raising funds for the women's war aid
of the university.
Scholten Wins Oratorical Contest'
Holland, May 30.-Walter Scholten
won first prize of $30 in the annual
Raven oratorical contest at Hope.

"The United States entered thi
great controversy because the ideal
of liberty were being trodden unde
fat,cand she will not withdraw unt
autocracy is wiped off the earth."
This was the statement anent Ame
ica's entrance into the world war thE
President Harry B. Hutchins mad
yesterday afternoon at the public m
morial services held in Hill eudito
ium.
"Citizenship implies duty and sacr
fice as well as privileges," continue
the president. "By obeying the law
and paying his taxes a man is perforn
ing only a part of the duty embodie
in citizenship. The young men w
leave to uphold the standards of the
country may be sure that the old
element at home will do its share I
bring about a sudden and permane
peace."
Recalls Civil War Incidents
Following the president's talk, Rol
ert Campbell, member of the G. A. I
who presided at the meeting, told 0
an incident during the Civil war I
which students from the Universit:
Washtenaw and Ypsilanti high school
figured prominently. It was immed
ately after President Lincoln's call I
1862 for 300,000 men that a sma
coterie of University students orga
ized a company of volunteers, whic
left directly for Washington.
Marching across the state of Mar
land singing battle songs the regime
in which the student company was
part became known among the soldie
as the "singing regiment." Two week
after the students left Ann Arbor the
saw active service at South Mountal
Regiment Given New Name
Describing this episode, Mr. Cam
bell said, "The commander of the reg
ment asked for volunteers to atta
the rebels who were lodged in a ga
at South Mountain. Presently one r
the Michigan students signified h
willingness to 'do so. Before Ior
every man in the regiment was t
and ready to charge.
"At first the men moved slowly, b
when they saw their comrades fa
dead by their side they went after t
rebels like a pack of wolves, and th
one little regiment with its backbo
of students routed a whole brigade
rebels. This repulse was the first t
Confederates suffered. " After that t
'singing regiment' was called ti
'stone wall' regiment."
Sing National Airs
During the meeting General Jol
A. Logan's first memorial order w
read by William Walz, 'former A
Arbor mayor, and Lincoln's Gettysbu:
address by Gustave Sodt. "Tenting
the Old Camp Ground," "Battle Hyn
(Ccntinueed on Page Six.)
UPPER PENINSULA CLUB TO
HOLD SMOKER AT "Y" TONIGI
The officers of the Upper Peninsu
club have anno~nced a smoker for 7:
o'clock this evening at the Universi
Y. M. C. A., to which all of the m
from the upper peninsula are invite
W. K. Niemann '17, will speak <
"My Idea of the Purpose of the Upp
Peninsula Club."
There will also be a faculty speak
and plenty of smokes for all. A fiv
piece orchestra will furnish the m
sic.

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