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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 22, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-22

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EATHER

'

CLOUDY AND COOL;
PROBABLY RAIN

I

Dattui

DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

UNITED PRESS

a

ate......,,...

VOL. XXVII. No. 165. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 22, 1917. PRICE FIVE CENT.

PETITION 1FAORING
HONOR SYSTEM IN
EAMS CIRCULATED
UNGERGRADUATES ESPECIALLY
ARE URGED TO RE-
SPOND
MAY SIGN AT UNION
OR AT DAILY OFFICE
Attempt to Foster a Greater Spirit of
Honor Among Students
of.University
With the end of the semester in
sight the question of taking examina-
tions without faculty supervision has
again been raised on the campus. A
group of students, desiring to discover
the attitude of the undergraduates on
this question, has drawn up the fol-
lowing petition. All who wish to sign
it may do so at the Union or at The
Daly offices inthe AnniArbor Press
building, Maynard street.
In an attempt to foster a greater
spirit of honor among the students of
the University, and with the hope of
making that spirit felt by the faculty
and the people of the state, we have
signed this creed:
We believe-
(1) That Michigan has given up
something for which we owe a debt
of honor.
(2) That our class has an honor
spirit which we are in duty bound to
uphold.
(3) That we each as individuals
should preserve our self-respect and
honor.
(4) That our standards should not
be lowered by countenacing the giving
or receiving of aid by any individuals
among us.
(5) That one of the ways in which
we can fulfill our duty to our Uni-
versity, to class, and to ourselves is
to maintain a spirit of honor in exam-
inations as our conscience directs.
GARGOYLE GOES ON
SALE TODAY NOON
Haor Magazine Contains Epic and
Double Page Drawing of
Swing-out
Containing an epic poem entitled,
"The Student's Saturday Night, or the
Great Unwashed," which details the
difficulties and joys of ablutions in
Ann Arbor, and with a host of sallies
at the "War Class of '17," the Gargoyle
will put in its appearance on the cam-
pus at noon today.
Foremost among the illustrations is
the double-page drawing by Roger
Davis, '20, showing the swing-outs of
the past and the one of the present.
Underclassmen who wondered con-
cerning the conversation which takes
place during the procession will be
fully informed, for the Gargoyle im-
pressed several pseudo secret service
men to eavedrop on the black-gowned
ones. The result is a record of bellig-
erent and martial remarks which one
does not ordinarily associate with col-
lege graduates.
Griffins Initiate Twelve Men Today
Twelve men will gather around the
flag pole at 5 o'clock this afternoon
to endure the hardships of initiation.
These men will be taken into the camp
of the Griffins, all-campus honorary so-
ciety.
After the ceremonies, a banquet will
be held at the Union.

Pennsylvania Faculty Oppose Attack
Philadelphia, May 21.-The faculty
of the University of Pennsylvania has
taken exception to the statement of a
Philadelphia newspaper that the
Wharton school faculty members are
becoming "Intellectual Butlers," and
is deploring the "black eye" that the
university has been receiving through-
out the country by such publicity.
British Mission to Go to Chicago
Washington, May 21.-The British
mission, headed by Balfour, has de-
termined to go to Chicago sometime
this week, it was announced this aft-
ernoon.
Toastmasters Hold Party Friday
Toastmasters will hold their thirtieth
annual dinner-dance Friday at Whit-
more lake. Nine new members will be

MICHIGANENSIAN TO
APPEAR THURSDAY
Still 100 Copies Not Yet Subscribed
for; Will Sell for
$3.0
The 1917 Michiganensian will be
placed on sale Thursday morning at
8 o'clock in the main corridor of U-
hall. The sale will continue in U-hall
from 8 to 5 o'clock Thursday and Fri-
day, after which any remaining copies
can be obtained at the Press building.
Almost the entire edition has been
subscribed for, but there are about
100 copies left that will sell for $3.50.
The price to those who have made
the advance payment of 50 cents will
be $2.50.
One-half of the edition will arrive
from the binders for the Thursday
sale, and the other half will be here
Friday. The printing was done by a
Rochester, N. Y., printery, while a De-
troit firm had the contract for the
binding.
CHOOSE MEMBERS OF
BOARD IN CONTROL
Hold Election of Three Men Friday
Afternoon in University
Hall
In order to choose three members
of the board in control of student
publications for the college year 1917-
18, an election will be held from 10
to 4 o'clock on Friday, May 25, in
the corridor of University hall. Every
student in the University is entitled to
vote. This election will be in charge
of the editor of The Michigan Daily
and such assistants as he may appoint.
The following students have been nom-
inated for members of the board:
Glenn Coulter, '18L.
Lee E. Joslyn, '19L.
H. S. Taylor, '17E.
Waldo M. McKee, '18E.
Robert C. Patterson, '18.
Lester E. Waterbury, '17.
Paul M. Haller, '18.
Albert E. Horne Jr., '18.
Joseph R. Darnall, '18M.
FROSH FROLIC FRIDAY
First Year Lits Hold Annual Party
at Armory
Plans are progressing rapidly for
the annual Fresh Frolic to be held
Friday evening, June 1, at the Armory,
and all indications point to a gala af-
fair for the yearling lits.
Elaborate decorations and a special
program will be featured, and Wright's
saxophone orchestra has been secured
for the music. There will be refresh-
ments and dancing from 9 to 2 o'clock.
President Donald J. Thorpe, '20, will
lead the grand march.
Summer flannels will be in order
and flowers are tabooed. Tickets at $2
will go on sale at the Union desk at
2 o'clock this afternoon, and fresh lits
will be given first choice, the sale be-
ing opened to the campus if there are
any tickets left.
STYLUS CONTEST STORIES
MUST BE IN BY JUNE 1
All stories to be submitted to the
Stylus short story contest should be
in by June 1 and should be given to
Miss Gladys Vedder in the rhetoric li-
brary.
This contest is held every year and
a prize of five dollars is awarded to
the best short story written by an
undergraduate woman.

CHICAGO UNIVERSITY TO
KNOW ITS WAR RESOURCES
Chicago, May 21.-A committee of
15 faculty members has been ap-
pointed by President Harry Pratt Jud-
son of the University. of Chicago to
devise effective means for the utiliza-
tion of the resources of the university'
and the university men in the war.

SE[NATE STARTS ON
PROHBITON CTS
Mal mendments to Food Control
Legislation Of-
fered
SOME CURTAILMENT OF
LIQUOR SEEMS LIKELY
Drys Look for Response to Their
Appeals for Action on
Question
By Robert Bender
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, May 21.-An over-
whelming desire to make the United
States dry, at least partially, de-
veloped in the senate today when food
control legislation came up for dis-
cussion. It met a flood of amendments
designed to cut everything in the way
of stimulants.
Many Amendments Offered
When the deluge passed, the senate
faced the following: An amendment
by Senator Jones, Washington, em-
powering President Wilson to com-
mandeer all intoxicating liquors in the
country, to be redistilled for use in
munitions manufacture; an amend-
ment by Senator Jones prohibiting the
use of grains and other food stuffs in
the manufacture of any intoxicants for
use other than the manufacture of mu-
nitions and mechanical devices and for
medicinal purposes; an amendment by
Cummins prohibiting the use of cereal
grains in the manufacture of intoxi-
cating beverages; an amendment by
Wadsworth of New York prohibiting
the use of foods in the manufacture'
of distilled spirits and establishing a
maximum of four per cent alcohol in
the manufacture of beers and wines,
and authorizing the secretary of the
treasury to stipulate the percentage of
alcohol in beers and liquors manufac-
tured in or imported into the United
States.
Senate Favors Prohibition
The senate displayed a tendency to
grant some form of war prohibition.
The drys are absolutely confident that
the manufacture of distilled liquors at
least will be stopped..
MEN SENTENCED FOR
FOMENTING STRIKE
Attempt to Arouse Munitions Workers
Sends Three to Peni-
tentiary

Outline Rules of Registration
For Students Jetween 21 and 30

GERMANY STARTS
PREPARATIONS FOR
SPETROGRAD DRIVE

All University students who on June
5,.1917, will be at least 21 and not yet
31 years of age, and whose homes are
not in Washtenaw county, must reg-
ister under the selective conscription
act, in the office of the registrar of
the University as follows:
Those from states other than Michi-
gan, Thursday to Monday, May 24 to
28, inclusive; those from Michigan,
Tuesday to Saturday, May 29 to June
2, inclusive. The -office of the regis-
trar in University hall will be open
9 to 12 o'clock and 2 to 5 o'clock daily
except Sunday. Those who are too ill
to some in person may register by
agent. The registration cards, when
signed by the registrar or one of his
deputies, must be mailed by the stu-
dent so as to reach the sheriff of his
home county before June 5, and a
stamp must be enclosed for the return
of the official registration certificate.

The only persons excused from reg-
istering are men in the navy or regu-
lar army of the United States, the ma-
rine corps, or the officers' reserve
corps; men in the enlisted reserve
corps actively in the service of the
United States on June 5; and the mem-
bers of the national guard or naval
militia actually in the service of the
United States on June 5.
Sickness, physical disability of any
kind, or absence from home does not
excuse failure to register. National
guardsmen not mustered into the serv-
ice of the United States before June 5
must register.
A year's iiprisonment and enforced
registration are the penalty for failure
to register, or for making false state-
ments at registration, whether about
oneself or another person.
ARTHUR G. HALL,
Registrar.

WORN-OUT DIVISIONS SENT
RUSSIAN FRONT FROM
WEST

TO

CAMPUSSTRS APPEAR
IN GLEE CLUB CONCERT
iKES AND DAMIS WILL SING;
SERENADERS' QUINTET
WILL PLAY
"It is a pleasure to me to endorse
the work of the Glee and Mandolin
club of the University. I am advised
that it is the purpose of the club to
give a concert May 25 in the Hill audi-
torium, the proceeds to be shared with
the Red Cross society. The object of
the concert is one to be commended
and it is hoped that the young men
will be rewarded for their efforts by
a full attendance.
"H. B. HUTCHINS."
Two of the special numbers of the
concert to be given in the Auditorium
Friday night will be the duet sung by
Chase B. Sikes, '17, and Horace L.
Davis, '17, and the selections by the
Serenaders' quintet. Both Sikes and
Davis are well known campus singers
and have been popular in former con-
certs. Their solo will be "Solenne in
Quest Ora," by Verdi.
The Serenaders' quintet contains
sone of the banjorine players of the
banjorine sextette who were so favor-
ably received in all of the cities made
on the club's trip last winter. The
:ive serenade artists are: L. 0. Ald-
rich, '17, R. M. Kempton, '18M, H. L.
Davis, '17, L. N. Parker, '17, and 0. 0.
Leininger.
ENGINEERS HONORED
BY WEB AND FLANGE
Eighit Members of Junior Civil Class
Takeii Into Honorary
Society
Eight members were taken into the
Web and Flange, senior honorary civil
engineering society, last night at a
banquet held at the Union.
Those initiated are C. A. Hart, '18E,
Ward Sickler, '18E, W. S. Dinwiddie,
'ISE, Elmer Schacht, '18E, Carl Sabin,
'18E, James Hill, '18E, Robert Kim-
berly, '18E, and Richard Woodward,
'18E.
Robert L. McManee, '17E, was toast-
master for the occasion. The speakers
vere Prof. H. W. King, Prof. C. F.
Johnston, Donald Smith, '17E, H. A.
Taylor, '17E, Ward F. Sickler, '18E,
and Gardner S. Williams.
(hem ical Manufacturing Increases
Princeton, N. J., May 21.-Chemicals
are being manufactured in the United
States in twice the quantity that they
wore 10 years ago.
The war has given an impetus to
their production and the nation now
manufactures more than was formerly
imported from Germany, the center of
chemical manufacturing.

AMEICAN

AVITOR

*I

RECEIVEMOREHONORS
DISTINGUISHED SE R VIC E IN
FRANCE BRINGS
REWARD
By W. S. Forrest
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Paris, May 21.-More honors for
American aviators in Lafayette Esca-
brille were announced in orders for
the day this afternoon.
Sergeant C. Z. Johnson of St. Louis
and Sergeant Willis Haviland of Min-
neapolis were both awarded war
crosses with palms in recognition of
the number of enemy machines they
have brought down, and for faithful
and courageous work.
Adjutant Raoul Lusberry of New
York, the only ace in the American
flying squadron, was granted a palm
to his war cross. Charles H. Dolan
of Boston, admitted to the flying
squadron last week, was granted 21
days' leave to visit his home in Bos-
ton, where his mother is ill.
Haviland, 26, has been a member of
the Escabrille for nearly a year. John-
son, 27, is the son of Colonel B. B.
Johnson, U. S. A., retired. Dolan is
22 years old and has been in training
for several months at Pau. Lusberry
has a brilliant record. He already
has several decorations, and as an ace
is recognized as the premier air fighter
of the American flyers.
Asks Men to Sign Regatta Posters
Posters advertising the spring re-
gatta ofthe University boat club will
be placed on the bulletin boards of
the campus and at the boathouse to-
day.
The regatta is an annual event, but
it is thought by some that there is not
enough interest being shown this year
to warrant its being held as usual.
All interested are asked to sign up
-t once, so that the campus opinion
may be observed.
Engineering Society Holds Dance
Engineers are shaking the moth-
balls out of white trousers in prepara-
tion for the White Trouser Frolic to
be given tonight at the Union under
the auspices of the Engineering so-
ciety. This will be the last member-
ship dance given by the society this
year and a large attendance is ex-
pected.
Expect 100 Outside Practitioners
That the number of odtside dental
practitioners who will attend the
course in war dental surgery being
prepared by the faculty of the dental
college will reach the 100 mark is the
belief of the faculty. Inquiries regard-
ing the course are being received daily
from dental practitioners all over the
state.

FRENCH AND ENGLISH
MAKE SLIGHT GAINS
Strike Together Taking Trenches;
Italians Also Advance on
Austrians
By William Philip Simms
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
With the British Armies in the Field,
May 21.-Field Marshal von Hinden-
burg is sending his shattered divisions
from the western front to the eastern
and northern battle lines, where they
are being reformed for a drive on
letrograd. Fresh divisions are being
shunted from the Russian front back
to face the French and English drives.
German prisoners revealed a two-
fold purpose behind "this plan. The
first objective is to force Russia into
a separate peace by taking additional
territory, and the second is to use the
gains on the eastern front as a lever
against the allies.
Germany's Eastern Line Thin
The eastern line is just now quite
thin and is being augmented by these
worn-out divisions from the west.
British headquarters estimated today
a total of 40 divisions (about 400,000
men) have been smashed since the
start of the offensive.
French Strike in Union with Haig
London, May 21.-Striking together,
the armies of Field Marshal Haig and
General Nivelle achieved a brilliant
success, taking several lines of Ger-
man trenches. The British advance
was made in the sector embracing
Bullecourt, the foundation of the
Oppy.Queant part of the Hindenburg
line. The French gains were all in
the Champagne district from Rheims
east to Auberive.
Singing Italians Push Forward
Rome, May 21.-Italian troops are
still pushing forward north of Gorizia.
They are climbing seemingly inacces-
sible hills, singing patriotic songs as
they advance. Numerous fresh Aus-
trian divisions from the Russian front
were hurled against the Italians in an
effort to stop their drive:
DOREMUS PROPOSAL
PASSED BY HOUSE
Votes 96 to 92 to Put Tax on Firms
with Eight Per Cent Profit on
Capital Stock
Washington, May 21.-The Doremus
amendment to levy a tax on manufac-
turers earning more than eight per
cent on the capital stock, was passed
by the house late today by a vote of
96 to 92. The amendment was made
to a proposal of Representative Kelley
of Michigan that the five per cent tax
on automobiles at the factory be
stricken out. This proposal was de-
feated.
A motion by Representative Gillet of
Massachussets to eliminate the five
per cent tax on motorcycles was de-
feated 89 to 49.
DETAIN WOMAN FOR POISONING
OF PHILADELPHIA SOLDIERS
Pittsburg, May 21.-Three myster-
ious fires recently in the munitions
making district of Allegheny county
have a direct connection with the
poisoning last week of 50 Philadelphia
soldiers on duty in that district, Coun-
ty Fire Marshal Thomas Pfarr de-
clared today.
He ordered the detention of Mrs.
Carl Miller, wife of the proprietor of
a restaurant where Lieutenant Corcor-
an and 49 of his men ate shortly be-
fore they became ill. Later Pfarr or-

dered Mrs. Miller to be brought before
him for examination.
Pri:ceton to Open in Fall as Usual
Princeton, N. J., May 21.-President
Hibben of Princeton university has
announced that the university will
open next fall as usual in spite of the
large number of men who will be un-
able to return.

*

New York, May 21.-Frank von
Rintelin, David Lamar, and H. B. Mar-
tin were each sentenced today to a
year in the Mercer county peni-
tentiary, Trenton, N. J., for attempting
to foment a strike in a munitions
plant.
The plea of von Rintelin that he be
interned as a military prisoner instead
of being imprisoned was denied by
Federal Judge Cushman, who held that
he had no jurisdiction.
Lamar addressed the court, point-
ing out his activities against the big
financial interests. He admitted that
this was selfish, but declared that he
had been converted to diffident beliefs
in 1908. He told the court that he in-
tended to carry on his work when he
regained freedom.
TEN BILLION NEEDED
Secretary McAdoo Says This Much Re-
quired for First Year
Des Moines, Ia., May 21.-Ten bil-
lion dollars will be required to finance
the first year of the war, Secretary of
the Treasury McAdoo said here this
afternoon in addressing bankers and
business men on the liberty bond is-
sue. "We don't intend to be dragged
in the wheels of any military auto-
cracy as Belgium has been," the sec-
retary said.

l

"SWIG- OUT Past and Present."
THVT EGA R OAY! E
Funny Stories, Pietures and Jokes Galore. 15 Cis.

135 Ct.

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