100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 22, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

EWEATHER
ABLY SHOWERS;
TODAY

4rk

Iatj

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT SPIRT
SERVICE

L. XXVIII. No. 166.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 1918.

PRICE THREE CEI

IIGCEST PARADE
IN YEARS OPENS
RED CROSS DIV
NIVERSITY HELPS IN MAKING
DEMONSTRATION HUGE
SUCCESS
RENCH OFFICERS TAKE
PART IN MERCY MARCH
res. McKinney, of Ypsilanti Normal
College, Praises Work of Amer-
- ican Red Cross
(E. A. S.)
Ann Arbor witnessed one of the
eatest celebrations in 35 years yes-
rday, as the parade, two miles in
ngth, passed through the thronged
.reets, for the opening of the $13,000
rive for the American Red Cross.
Never before in the history of the
ty have so many persons taken part
. such a demonstration, and never
efore have so many spectators lined
.e streets to watch. "We have just
itnessed one of the greatest demon'-
,rations Ann Arbor has ever seen,"
atid Henry W. Douglas, chairman of
e county Red Cross, after the par-

Lieut. Williams Praises Cadets
Lieut. Losey J. Williams, s in com-
menting on the appearance of the
cadets in the parade, said, "They did
very well, and kept their step during
the entire march." The army me-
chanics, the cadet band, members of
the faculty, and the graduates and sen-
iors in their caps and gowns, added
greatly to the success of the demon-
stration. .
"We appreciate especially the sup-
port of the faculty and student body
of the University," said Mayor Ernst
M. Wurster yesterday. "Such an event,
cannot be successful without the sup-
port of everyone." The only celebra-
tion that ever equalled this one in
Ann Arbor, said Mayor Wurster, was a
large presidential campaign about 35
years ago.
Many Subscriptions Made
Throughout the entire parade, "Fill
the flag" was accepted as the slogan
with enthusiasm, and "buckets of
money" were received by the commit-
tee. The booths erected in the down
town sections have reported a num-
ber of large subscriptions, -aside from
the smaller ones, some amounting to
$300. It is generally expected by the
officials that the quota will be over-
subscribed before tomorrow night.
"I congratulate you for the splendid
parade, said President McKenny, of
the Ypsilanti Normal college, in his
patriotic address at the conclusion of
the parade, "not because of its beauty,
but because it typifies the grim deter-
mination of the people of Ann Arbor,
Washtenaw county, and the United
States. I appeal to you as father of
two sons who are preparing for ser-
vice now in France, to stand firmly for
victory."
Speaks for Great Institutions
"The Red Cross and the Y. M. C. A.
are the two greatest institutions today.
that are carrying the love from the
home to the boys at the front," con-
tinued President McKenny. "Fifty
thousand French babies are rocked to
sleep by the Red Cross, hundreds of
thousands of Belgian babies are now
in the care of the Red Cross, and hos-
pitals and wrecked homes are being
provided for by them. I need not ap-
peal to you for a moment to do your
share. I am already sure that you
have done it.
"We are, in the war to win a just
and lasting peace. Let us fight it out
for once and for all. The dead men
will have died in vain unless we carry
oui victory. We are here to make up
the morale for the country, for it is
(Continued on Page Six)

DRUIDS A"MIT 11
JUNIOR AWENYDDS
Druids, senior literary honorary so-
clety, made its annual spring journey
to the depths of the forest yesterday
afternoon, returning with the deepen-
ing shadows of evening to stop at the
ancient Druid altar, where waited 11
Awenydds in hushed expectancy.
After the western sun had rested
for the final moment upon the gleam-
ing Druid sickle, and when the final
note of the temple bell had died away,
there were welcomed into the order
the following members of the class of
1919: Walter Stark, Ingham Emerson,
John D. Cameron, Donald P. Yerkes,
Harold S. Trueman, James W. Clark,
Jr., Earl F. Ganshow, Clark W. Bish-
op, Harold J. Saunders, Roy H Frick-
en, and Raymond R. Beardsley.
The initiation banquet was held aft-
er the initiation at the Catalpa Inn,
and toasts were responded to by Al-
len Shoenfield, Prof. Morris P. Tilley,
James Schermerhorn, Jr., James
Clark, and- Dean John R. Effinger,
who sounded the keynote of the hour
in his talk on "The Call of the
Times."
ANNUNCE COMMITTEES
FOR ORATORICAL PLAY
STUDENTS GIVEN OPPORTUNITY
TO LEARN STAGE
DIRECTING
Besides being intended to enter-
tain, "The Silver Box." the Oratorical
association play to be presented Fri-
day, May 24, in University hall, is
also .expected to furnish an opportu-
nity for the students taking part in it
to learn stage-setting and play direct-
ing.
There are several committees for
the costumes, lighting effects and dif-
ferent acts of the play, all of whom
are carrying out their individual
work separately, but are under the
general supervision of Prof. R. D. T.
Hollister, of the oratory department,
director of the play.
List of Committees
The committees consist of the fol-
lowing men and women:
Costumes, Helen W. Sellew, spec.,
June Brooks, '18, Eugene Given, '19;
first act, Abigail Blackburn, '18, Ag-
nes M. Parks, grad., Eva Bowen, '18,
Richard Forsythe, '20; second act,
Gladys Greening, '18, Mabel E. Ban-
nister, '19, Carl L. Dahlstrom, '19;
third act, Herman A. August. '19,
Lionel G. Crocker, '18, Wilfred Nevue,
'18, Marion L. Moses, '20; curtain and
lights, Nina M. Kellog, '18, Abigail
Blackburn, '18; mistress of proper-
ties, Nona G. Myers, '18, programs,
Mabel E. Bannister, '19, chairman;
and ushers, Harry A. Wellford, '18,
chairman.
Tickets for the play are now on
sale at Water's, Slater's, and Shee-
han's book stores on State street.
Hold Rehearsals
Rehearsals have been continuing for
the past two weeks and, dress re-
hearsals will be held tonight and to-
morrow night.
Several of the persons taking lead-
ing roles. in "The Silver Box" are al-
ready well known on the campus for
their dramatic ability. The most im-
portant roles of the play are taken by
LaVerne Ross, grad., Gladys Green-
ing, '18, Richard Forsythe, '20, Carl
L. Dahlstrom, '19, Lionel G. Crocker,
'18. and Mabel E. Bannister, '19.
_________________________________________

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT MAKES
TEN TEACHING APPOINTMENTS

DANIELS HINTS AT
BIG NAVYPROGRAM
Millions of Troops to Be Conducted
to France by Next Summer
'"In Safety"
DESTROYER "GREATEST NAVAL
SHIP," CLAIMS SECRETARY1
Supply of Ships Inadequate to Carry
Large Number of Men Enlisting
in Navy
New Brunswick, N. J., May 21. -
Joseph Daniels, secretary of the
navy, in an address at the Rector
college commencement today, said
"We are building ships, but we can
not build them in a day. But, before
another summer, we shall have
enough ships, not only to carry a
million troops to France, but millions
to France, and enough destroyers to
see them there in safety."
"We are going to get out the greatest
naval ship that is produced--destroy-
ers," the secretary continued. "We
have 300,000 men in the navy now.
We will have 400,000 soon. They are
enlisting so fast that we have to ask
them to stay home for a few days un-
til we can build new ships."
'The day may come,' said the sec-
retary, "when, if necessary, congress
may change the draft age limit. If
the men between 21 and 31 can not
win the war, then they will call on
the men from 16 to 18 to win the
war."
GLEE CLUB CONCERT
TO BE HELD JUNE 5
The annual spring concert, given
by the varsity glee and mandolin
clubs, will be held the night of June
5 in Hill Auditorium. Several solos
and quartette numbers will be on the
program, but as yet nothing definite
has been arranged.
One of the features on the program
will be a combination of the two mus-
ical organizations and the audience in
rendering different songs of the pa-
triotic variety consisting of both rag-
time pieces and national anthems.
The mandolin club will play a Polish
dance and a waltz known as "In the
Pines," while the songsters are go-
ing to give a number called a Nether-
land Folk song which begins with
very little volume and gradually ris-
es into a crescendo, enabling one to
almost see the country peasant folk
dancing on the village green.
Beside the list of songs on the pro-
gram, there will be several features
played on various types of instru-
ments, although plans have not yet
been completed regarding this part of
the concert.
COMEDY CLUB WILL HOLD
NEW TRY-OUTS SATURDAY
Try-outs for membership in the
Comedy club will be continued from
9 till 12 o'clock Saturday, in New-
berry hall. It has been announced
that those who failed to qualify last
Saturday may have another opportu-
nity to try out for the club at this
time. The final elections will be
made public sometime next week.
Present members of the organiza-
tion will meet at 7 o'clock Thursday
evening in the Cercle Francais room,
for the purpose of electing officers for
the coming year.
UNION WILL EXPEND $00

FOR CARNIVAL DECORATIONS
More than $300 will be expended by
the construction committee of the
Union carnival for the decorations
and structures to be put up in the
hall, according to the chairman's an-"
nouncement yesterday.
Several more men are needed to help
out in the work, and the 'committee
has called for a few lits and some
mechanical and electrical engineers.
Anyone who will volunteer has been1
asked to sign the roll in Room 225;
Engineering building.
Cosmopolitans Adopt Constitution
The Women's Cosmopolitan club
adopted a constitution at their meet-
ing last evening in Newberry Hall.
They also elected an administrative;
board, who are: Clara Klathaak,
School of Music, Me Ting, '20M, Dor-
othy Winchell, '21, Dorothy Jacobson,i
Spec., and Livisa Youngs, '21.

MCADoo RELIEVES
RAIL PRESIDENTS

Director General Will Appoint
eral Director for Each
Road
PRESENT HEADS OF STEAM

Fed-

LINES MAY GET POSITIONS
New Government Managers Will Be
Chosen from Operating Forces
of Properse
Washington, May 21.-Every rail-
road president in the United States
was relieved from active duty as ex-
ecutive manager of his railroad to-
day by Director General McAdoo, who
will appoint a federal director for
each road, responsible only to the
railroad administration. In many cas-
es the president' of the road may be
named federal director.
To safe guard the interests of capi-
talists, federal directors, whenever
possible, will be appointed from
among the operating forces of the
property, the director general an-
nounced. This will avoid disrupting
unnecessarily any road's working or-
ganization.

3

STATES EXCEED
RED CROSS QUOTAS

-Washington, May 21. - Returns
from the American Red Cross cam-
paign for a second $100,000,000 war
mercy fund received tonight show
the drive is meeting with success ev-
erywhere. Reports at hand show
that more than one-fourth of the
fund had been raised.
Three states-Michigan, South Da-
kota, and Delaware-and many cities
have exceeded their quotas and still
are driving forward for more funds.
MEDICAL STUDENTS
TO REGISTER JUNE 5
Washington, May 21.-Medical stu-
dents and divinity students, although
exempt from draft, must register on
June 5 along with all other young
men, citizens or aliens, reaching the
age- of 21 years on or before that
date. Provost Marshal General Crow-
der made this statement today.
ENGINEER ASSEM~BLY LECTURES
DEAL WITH WAR AND ETHICS
Two of the engineering assembly
lectures Thursday morning deal with
the war, and the third is concerned
with business ethics. Mr. John S.
Worley, of the Interstate Commerce
commission, will address the seniors
at 10 o'clock on "Ethics Applied to
Public Service Corporations." The
juniors at 9 o'clock. will hear Prof.
Arthur L. Cross on "The Current Po-
litical Situation in England," and
Dean John R. Effinger will speak to
the sophomores at 8 o'clock on "Edu-
cation and the War."
A. Wood Returns from Convention
Mr. Arthur E. Wood, of the so-
ciology department, has just return-
ed from Kansas City, where he at-
tended the national convention of So-
cial Workers.
Part of the time of the convention,
according to Mr. Wood, was given
over to the discussion of establishing1
Red Cross courses in universities all+
over the country. The work which
the convention wishes to further is
concerned only with home relief+
problems in connection with the war.
Forestry Club Holds Final Meetingsi
Members of the forestry club will
hold their last meeting of this se-
mester at 7:30 o'clock tonight in
room 215 Natural Science building.
Prof. Filibert Roth, head of the for-
estry department, will address the}
club. The subject of his talk has not
been announced. A general get-to-
gether will be held after the meeting,a
and refreshments will be served.
Girls' Glee Club Serenades Dorms
All the dormitories and sororities
were serenaded last night by the
Girls' Glee club. National anthems,
serenades, and college songs were}
sung. They wene directed by Miss
Nora Crane Hunt. At the close of the
serenading the club was entertained}
by the Theta Phi Alpha house.

DAILY WANTS LETTERS
OF MEN IN SERVICE
Beginning at as early a date
as possible, The Daily will pub-
lish once or more each week a
page of excerpts of letters from
Michigan men in the service, or
pertaining to Michigan men. The
Daily especially desires letters
from those who are actually
fighting in France.
Entire letters or excerpts
should be typewritten whenever
possible and left with Mr. Fran-
cis Bacon, '02, at the Union, or
sent to The Daily office. Letters
will be returned only when a
stamped envelope is inclosed.
STUDENT COUNCIL ELECTS l
OFFICERS FOR NEXT YEA
R. E. GAULT,'19, CHOSEN TO HEAD
ORGANIZATION DURING
1918-19
Studentrcouncil elected the follow-
ing officers for the year 1918-19 at a
meeting last night:
President, Ralph E. Gault, '19;
vice-president, C. T. Van Dusen, '19E;
recording secretary, J. I. McClintock,
'19; corresponding secretary, S. C.
Zylstra, '19E; treasurer, C. B. Camp-
bell, '19E; and auditor, F. C. Bell, '19.
Cap Night plans were discussed by
the Student Council at last night's
meeting, and David E. Heineman, '87,
food administrator of Detroit, was
announced as the speaker for the
alumni at the Cap Night ceremonies.
Raymond Munro, '19E, was ap-
pointed chairman of the Cap Night
committee to take the place of Van
Dusen, with E. E. Raymond, '19E, as
an additional member of the com-
mittee.
The Student Council issued a re-
quest asking that freshman refrain
from cutting or mutilating their
"pots" and toques, as they will all be
collected Cap Night and shipped
abroad by the Comforts Forwarding
committee of Ann Arbor.
SENIOR WOMEN PLAN
17TH ANNUAL PLAY
Senior women are makng plans for
the 17th annual senior play, to be
giveh on Tuesday of Commencement
week. The play is presented out of
doors on the campus the evening of
class day, and three variations on the
pantomine theme, Harlequine and
Colombine, have been selected for
this year's production."
The three plays which have been
selected, subject to change are: J.
M. Berrie's "'Pantaloon," Oliphant
Downs' "Maker of Dreams," and Wil-
liam Askel's "Colombine." Each of)
the plays will require a separate cast,
and second tryouts will be held today
from 2 to 4 o'clock, in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall. Alice Burtless, '18, chair-
man, urges all seniors to try-out for
the play.
PROFESSOR.CROSS TO TALK ON
"BRITISH EMPIRE" TONIGHT
Prof. Arthur L. Cross, of the his-
tory department, will deliver the fin-
al war series lecture on "The British
Empire and What It Stands For," at
7:30 o'clock tonight in NaturalSci-

ence auditorium.
Professor Cross' lecture deals
mainly with the British empire, as
influenced by the great war.

.-

TEUTN ATLLR
AUSTRALIANS AND FRENCH W
IMPORTANT GROUND IN
TWO SECTORS
GERMANS CAPTURE
AMERICAN AVIATO
Turkish Troops Mutiny in Asia Min
Japan Reaches Understanding
With China
(By Associated Press)
Paris, May 21.-At Hailles hill, sou
of the river Acre, on the Amiens fro
the artillery on both sides was acti
last night, says the official stateme
issued today. French patrols broug
in a number of prisoners.
Washington, May 21.-Further e'
dence that' another great Austri
drive against Italy is impending, car
in an official dispatch from Switze
land.
The dispatch stated that the I
formation from Vienna showed Au
tria had planned to suppress all m
itary operations in the east, and
May 20, to concentrate forces for t
Italian front.
With the American army in Fran
May 21.-Captain James Norman Ha
of Colfax, Iowa, who has been miE
ing since May 7, is wounded and
prisoner in a German -hospital. Ca
tain Hall, who was attached to th
American aviation corps, disappear
after an aerial engagement over t:
German lines.
With the British army in Fran
May 21.-The rumor that Field Ma
shal von Hindenberg is dead has
come current very recently among t'
enemy in the back areas, as well
civilians. What basis, if any, the
is for this report, is not known he
(According to a London dispatc
dated May 13, German prisoners, ca
tured in France, inferred that Fie
Mar,3hal von Hindenberg was dead,)
Striking viciously at the enemy
various points along the western b
tle Iront, meeting each outburst
German artillery with a thunder
cannon fire, and maintaining the mas
ery of the air in every sector, the arm
ies of the Entente Allies are prever
ing the Teutonic army from quiet
perfecting their preparations for tV
coming battle. With the passing
each day, new American legions a
constantly brought to the front, a
the Allies are finding satisfaction
the fact that the Germans have be
unable to launch a new blow in t
struggle which Berlin is expecting
be the decisive one of the war.
Austrians Win Important Ground
The attacks of the French, ne;
Locre, on the northern side of t
Lys salient, and of the Australians b
fore Amiens, now appear 'to have be
more successful than was at first r
ported. Near Locre the French ha
not ontly taken strongly fortifi4
trenches but have made secure the
lines on each side of Hill 44, whi
they recaptured recently. The Au
tralians have won ground of practic

importance along the Amiens secto
They have gained higher groun
which lends itself well to defensiv
tactics, and will be valuable when th
time comes for a stern battle there.
On the American front there ha
been the usual lively exchange of arti
lery, but no infantry fighting has o
curred. The same is true of the situa
tion in the Italian theater.
Turks Mutiny in Asia Minor
A report from Athens states tha
Turkish troops in Asia Minor hav
mutinied, and that a force has bee
sent to squell the disorder. It is sa
that there have been many desertion
from the Turkish government in town
along the Asia Minor coast.
Japan and China have come to a
understanding, relative to the carry
ing out of joint military operations :
Siberia. It was announced sometin
ago -that -these operations would be d
rected only to insuring the securit
of each country's interests in Man
churia, Mongolia, and the far east.

* * * * . * * * * * *

MEN WANTED
ent opportunities for work
Daily editorial staff are
to several juniors, sopho-
and freshmen. Experi-
ned during the remainder
term will be of material
text semester. Applicants
bert at The Daily office be-
2:46 and 2:15 this aft-

s
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

Ten more teachers' positions have
been filled by the University depart-
ment of education in the past week.!
Superintendents from all parts of
the state are constantly selecting in-
structors through this department. A'
list of those for whom positions have
been obtained with the.subject which
they are to teach and the city in
which they are to be located is as fol-
lows:
J. Estelle Hooper, mathematics, at
Sault Ste. Marie; Ethel Reese, Latin,
at Allegan; Ella Campbell, Latin, at
Jackson; Mildred M. Stone, Spanish,
at Oxford; Helen Morse, head of the
English department, at Niles; Flor-
ence E. Field, mathematics, at Park
college Mo.; Vera Keyser, English, at
Monroe; Lena Sackett, English and
public speaking, at Monroe; Clarissa
McCollsin. history, at Monroe.

All senior literary students
who have not yet received their
invitations are' asked to call the
acting-chairman of the invitation
committee at 2395-R tomorrow if
they expect to get them. After to-
morrow, all invitations will be
sold to whoever desires them and
the proceeds from the sale held
in trust for the persons who or-
dered them., The committee warns
seniors who have not yet called
for their invitations that tomor-
row will absolutely be their last
chance to get them.

*

* *

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan