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May 18, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-thousand d

Scarcity of leather has forced the
Germans to use wooden soles. Could /CA RY A TIIJ
ol- it be said that they are now protected
from lightning at both ends? The institution of Straw-Hat day is
u- particularly popular among should-be
in- It is time the Germans began mak- wearers of the pot.
on iug their apology to humanity for
th starting the war. Or (Gathler Them Up from the DIagonal
re Why not draft the necessary seedy

Seniors Hear Ye! Hear.
IT IS TIME T LEAVE YOUR ORDER FC

gan men, both alumni and st
re soon to finance a deal i
this amount. The propositi
one which is compatible wi
s and patriotic ideals- a ra

Calling Cards

I

Arbor as The project is that of raising $250,-
000 to complete the new Union build-
- ing to such an extent that it may be
o words, used as a barracks and mess hall for
ily to ap-
aith, and the army mechanics who are to train
tin The
r, if left at the University. The -Union has been
e box in chosen for this purpose because it is
ry where
ock each the only building in Ann Arbor which
eceive no can accommodate the 700 or more men
returned the war department intends to send
that p- here. At least 1,200 could be housed
7itor and fed in the building, and it is
Manager not likely that the national authori-
s Editor ties will overlook these capacity fig-
a Editor ures when it determines the number
11 Editor of mechanics which will be allotted to
's Fditor the University.
, gditor In ordersto secure the $250,000
Manager which will be needed, the Union will
Manager conduct a campaign for life members.
The proceeds of the life membership
R. Atlas subscriptions are to be added to the
Lhlbert
lomovitz Union building fund. Liberty bonds
hinkman. will be accepted as full payment of
subscriptions.
. Angell At this point, both the patriotic 'and
landibo
Lamport the business angles of the proposition
a aohey become obvious. Subscribing to a life
ite Clark
L. Berry membership is a patriotic act in that
V Nelson it swells the building fund so that the
new Union may be made suitable for
D. Hausewar purposes. Fifty dollars paid for
Kilpatrick membership is just so much advanced
[es Abele to provide a messing and lodging place
. Storrer for the soldiers of Uncle Sam.
hke Buying a life membership and turn-
ing in a Liberty bond in payment
thereof is also advantageous from a
business point of view. In the first
118. place, Liberty bonds, which are not
Alpine quite at par, will be accepted at face
- value. In the second place, one may
secure a life membership during the
MEN months of May and June for $50, one-
e Mich- half the regular price.
ost try- If Michigan men take' into consid-
rom at- eration these two advantages of the1
scheme which they are asked to sup-l
iring to port, there is little doubt that the
g in the $250,000 will be subscribed with that
out of same spirit which has brought suc-
rear the cess to other patriotic campaigns con-
e_ Theducted at the University.

A peanut famine is threatening the;
country tePerhaps the elephants ought4
to be interned.

ones from the student directory? Re-
sults are certain to be satisfactory at
this time of year.

SAMPLES OF CORRECT AND UP-TO-DATE
ENGRAVING NOW IN

7
:1
t
'1
C

As a reminder to the aircraft board y
-investigation should not halt pro- urs g -StyepusLiarlikContest
duction.First gem--an emerald.
A fielt-hatted freshman named Quen-
tin
Somehow, we can' stand the war' ti
loafbuthotth wearstandeth arDidn't like those rough games, but he4
loaf, but not the war loafer, went in
For a kind-hearted soph
All hands on the rope today. Tipped the timid lad off
That unless he went quick, he'd be
BLAMESKAZIN6 ON 1920 sent in.
Second--a diamond in the rough.
HATCH, '19L, SAYS FRESIIMEX'S 'There was a fresh soph from Calcutta
IAILIJRE TO .WEAk POTS DOES Whose head was as soft as warm but-
.NOT JUSTIFY ACTION TAKEN tas
For a frsk young co-ed -
Lditor, The MTichligan Daily:Could turn the poor boob's head
ETheoTmmuicaion inye: d aysAnd set his green heart in a Iluttah.
The, communication in yest-erday's
Daily signed "A Sophomore Repre-
sentative" is entirely typical of soph- "Disam' damaskene 'nough for a gem,
omoric reasoning. Sambo; dis am a Gillette."
Suppose the freshmen do not wear A Junior whose name was Van Buren
their "pots." Does thatdjustify the Saw the tug-of-war downsby the Hur-
sophomores. in hazing themr? Unless on;
the freshmen can be proved to have But as he stood, by the brink
been willing participants in tie haz- LHe slippedhinto the drink,
ing, the hazing seems to constitute a And lost off his spectacles Shur-on.
most flagrant violation of the rights of! "Gwan, Jazzmo, dat am what you
the individual, the very thing which does to git a gem; it's a crime, Jazz-
the democratic world is fighting Ger- mo, dat's all."
many about.
If, by refusing to wear their 'pots" The University of Reno is holding
the freshmen have proved themselves commencement exercises in Ann Ar-
unfit to be University men (a proposi- bor. The Times-News announces
tion I should question), surely then, "Four New Divorce Cases Started-.
the sophomores who -conducted the One Degree Granted."
hazing have proved themselves to be
many times more unfit, and in my op- - Two Harbor SprIngs girls have
inion should be dishonorably expelled been bitten by a mad dog and ordered
from the University at once. Ito the University of Michigan for
I fail to see any visible machinery treatment. We're getting a rabid lot
whereby the first year men can be of people down here, all right.
compelled to wear their "pots" unless
they so desire; and any application of The oGames
physical force whether by their own "Hey, man, get out of there, there's
classmates or by the members of any too many of you."
other class is wholly indefensible; It "I belong here, my name was print-
were better to allow the "pot" tra- ed with the list in The Daily this
dition to lapse entirely than to have morning."
to resort to such means to uphold it.
MELVILLE H. HATCH, '19L. The Coo-ed lamented as she toiled
i up the hill in the nice warm sunlight,
"Well, how was I to know, when I cut
him.last winter, that he would devel-
op'a car in the spring?"
-_...-----.. You ar'n't to blame, Evelyn, he
Board of directors of the Women's might just as easily have developed a
B-1a-11 ___rectuo. 'nlrs fte mIen' buggey in the brain."

EWAHIR'S
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE

We Sell
MAZDA LAMPS
Come in and see the 75 watt Blue Lamp
Gives a white light. Just the thing to study by
H. L. SWITZER CO.

1,rrra w.orw

Pace your order for

mmmmmm

VISITING- CA RDS
Now
The Slater Book Sho
DERI NIE IJ

It. Mc

physical training here again this sum-
mer.
Dancing Friday and Saturday nights
at the Armory.--Adv.
ISPRING STYLESI

a m
ng f
des
:win
irop
his'y
uenc
culty
expE

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackso
(May 14, 1918)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:2
m., S:io a. m., and hourly to 7:'o p. im.,
p. M.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops wes
Ann Arbor)-8:48 a. in., and every two he
to 9:48 p. in.
Local Cars East Bound-5:35 a. m.,
a. M., 7:05 a. m. and every two hours to
p. mn., 9:o5 p. mn., 10:50 p. in. To Ypsil
only, 8:o5 p. in., 11:50 p. M., 12:20 a.
i:io a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsil
Local Cars West Bound-6:oo a. m.,
a. In., 10:20 p.._111., 12:20 a. m.
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be larg
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Banf
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.O
Resources .........$4,000,000.0
Northwest Cor. Main & HuroA
.707 North University Ave.

'. 1 G
; it has
erienced

institution
ty football
of an in-
team. It
door every
represents
s who are
r time and
for a few
the time.
stood and
ig the col-
been rec-
collegiate
West. All
gh the con-
liing Mich-
ing to sac-
ork far into
ning. These
do their all

THE CONTRIBUTION OF T-IE
COLLEGES
When the President called for men to
enter the nation's service there were no
specifications as to the capital, that is,
the financial circumstances, of those who
should respond. The draft fell upon
rich and poor alike. In Pasadena's con-
tingent $1o0,000,ooo in the way of money
was represented; side by side with these
sons of wealth were those whose wealth
was summed in the clothes they wore.
The value of these men to the army was
their physical endurance, amenability
to discipline, courage, and initiative un-
der unforeseen conditions. Their poten-
tial value to the nation is not to be
reckoned in terms of money, which is
of use only to express contrasts. A
nation's assets are its citizens, especially
those who have talent and opportunity
to develop themselves in its behalf. Here
are God only knows how many "mute,
inglorious Miltons," embryo scientists,
statesmen, physicians, financiers, ready
or preparing to give the world their
best, who have instead been sacrificed
to Mars!
When we remember that between 6,-
ooo And 7,ooo Michigan university men
are in the United States service in one
capacity or another; that Harvard's con-
tribution is 5,6ooo; and that Yale's 4,800,
are divided in the three great army di-
visions, we see what an enormous:
amount of invested capital these three
universities alone, irrespective of the 500
yodd colleges and universities in the
country at large, have put at the nation's
service. It is estitnated that it costs
about $5,000 to put a boy through the
grades and take him to commencement
day in college. Nit counting the young
man's future possibilities, the father who
sees his son put on khaki may well
realize the value of the gift he offers his

S
i
Y
Fa
4
t'
r
1

league will meet at 9 o'clock this
morning at Barbour gymnasium.
Seniors and juniors will play base-
ball at 9 o'clock this morning on the
field across from Barbour gymnasium.
Women who have registered for
farm work should hand in their med-
ical reports to Miss Evans at once.
There are places for 100 more women
in this work. Applications may be
maie at Miss Evans' office Monday
morning. -
Short stoty manuscripts for the Styl-
us prize of $10 should be in the hands
of the rhetoric librarian before Mon-
day night. Undergraduate women ex-
cept members of Stylus are eligible
to compete..

Said the frosh as he fell on to the
front porch and pulled a raveling off
from his otherwise naked shoulder,
"Wherinelldlgetthis ?"
Miss Helen Fraser will . speak on
"Wonen's Part in Winning the War,"
at 8:15 o'clock Monday night in the
Natural Science auditorium.
Miss Alice Evans to Leave University
Miss Alice Exans, physical director
of women, will leave the University
this summer for training in an east-
ern hospital. She has not made defi-
hite plans for the time of her depart-
Aire or her future destination. Miss
Mary McKee, from Madison Wis.,
who taught here last summer will give

'.

11

I

SWAIN has the I
Photographic collectio
Arbor Views. See it.
713 East Universk
PIE-A-LA-MOD
.UNCHES and S

I

>ta

e more
It has

experienced
men have
y and have
dded vigor,
ask great.
t them The
:inue on the
maintained
t now and
te semester
of knowing
>aper when
They will
ence which

ESTARLISHED 1818
MADISON AVENUE COR. rORTY-FOURTH STREET
NEW YORK.
Telephone Murray Hill 8800

cpyrght Raft Shatrufer a Marl

needs
m all



th experience
ing to learn;
at heart and

country.
As a rule, it has been the college men
who have been first to answer the na-
tion's call. They have had the "vision
splendid;" they have glimpsed the ideal
that teaches men to die for their coun-
try as well as to live for it. The halls
of the great English universities were
emptied at England's first call, long be-
fore it had., been heard in London's gin
palaces. The same response has been*
made in America. - The Detroit Free
Press.

Our representative will be at the
HOTEL PONTCHARTRAIN, DETROIT
To-day,;May i8th
with Samples of Ready-made Clothing
Furnishings, Hats and Shoes
Sendfor Illustrated Catalogue
Uniforms for Officers in the Service
of the United States

Hart Schaffner & Marx
spring suits and top coats are
more snappy than ever this
spring; the kind of clothes red-
blooded Young men will be
wearing. They have incorporat-
ed in them all the style tenden-
cies that will be popular.
We have bought freely and as
a consequence offer you choice
of a stock unequalled for rich-
ness of choice and variety of
style, anywhere but in their
shops. You ( will find here
clothes as good as you can buy
in. any city, and_ the price is
more reasonable.
- New neckwear, Steson and
Knox Hats.
Reule, Gonlin, Fiegel & cO.
The Big Home of Hart Schaff-
ner and Marx Clothes, at South-
west Corner Main and Washing-
ton Streets.

Your every BI
ing need fulfille
THE
Farmers & Mechanics
101-105 So. Main 330 So.
(Nickels

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Try our
HOME-MA
T Candi
They are both delic

'

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BOSTON SALES- OFFICES
TREMONTCOR. BOYLSTON STREET

NEWPORT SALES-OFFICES
220 BELLEvuc .AvK u

MADE A
The SU(
Phone 987

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M I II M i M

f

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--- --Y---

T

FRESH

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