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May 18, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ASSOCIA
PREP
DAY AND NIGI
SERVI(

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 18, 1918. PP

_._.

I

OF. DOWRIE TO
LEAVE UNIVERSITY

MUZID DELIGHTS
LARGE AUIEC

Minneapolis, May 17.-Prof. George
W. Dowrie, of the economics depart-
ment of the Upiversity of Michigan,
will leave at the end of the present
semester to teach general economics
and banking here.
Professor Dowrie has been at the
University for the last five years,
where he gave special courses in
banking. He has written several books
on this subject, among them being the
"Development of Banking in Illinois
from 1817 to 1863." which presents a
careful and illuminating survey of a
significant period in banking history.
His interest in banking has not
been confined to the university curri-
culum, as he has been actively con-
nected with the Michigan Bankers' as-
sociation, being an advisor to the edu-
cational committee of that organiza-
tion.
Professor Dowrie will be connected
with the Guaranty Trust Co., of New
York during the coming summer. He
will take up his new work in the Uni-
versity of Minnesota in September.

21.1 CAD ETS CHOSEN
FOR FORT SHEIDA0N
Majority of Men in the List Are Over
Twenty-One Years of
Age
46 ALTERNATES ARE NAMED
BY LIEUT. GEORGE C. MULLEN

Italian
To

Singer Responds Generously.
Applause; Sings National
Antheni

o of

Professor Dowrie, when
of about his new position,
make any comment.

questioned
refused to

lost
that
had
er.
s on
ddle-
nine
then
the

GOERNMENT MAY OWN
STEEL MILL INDUSTRY
CHAIRMAN BARUCK TO ASK WIL-
SON FOR DRASTIC AC-
TION ,
Washington, May 17.-- Government
operation of the steel mills of the
war industries board and the Amer-
ican iron and steel institute, fail to
agree on steps to increase production
for the government and to satisfy the
Allies' need.
Chairman Baruck and his chief aides
are understood to be prepared to ask
President Wilson to take drastic ac-

NOTED SINGERS TO PRESENT
BIZET'S "CARMEN" TONIGHT
Joseph Bannat to Give Organ Recital
At Matinee Festival
Concert
(By Edna L. Apel)
Although the orchestra was in its
finest of moods at" the May Festival
concert last evening, the chief inter-
est centered in the local debut of the
much-heralded Claudia Muzio.
Mme. Muzio's voice is a magnifi-
cient example of Italian artistry and
superb vocalism. It is full of intense
feeling and pathos. It is evident
from her dramatic interpretations
that she was brought up in an operatic
atmosphere. Mme. Muzio was recall-
ed many times, responding generously
to encores. Besides several repeti-
ons she sang Puccini's "Madame
Butterfly" and "The Star Spangled
Banner." She ran onto the platform
envelloped- in a flag which was pre-
sented to her yesterday by the women
of Detroit, in the Hotel Statler, whom
she aided in selling War saving
stamps.
The Schumann symphony in D mi-
nor is a numbed which is continuous
in performance as well as in concep-
tion. The oboe and violincello melo-
dies in the introduction are repeated
throughout by different groups of in-
struments in varing intensities of
volume. The crescendo and descre-
scendo passages, ending in delicate
trills, are delightful.
Love Songs of Indians
McDowell's "Indian Suite" in three
movements is a fine representation
of the wierd,. somewhat heavy music.
of the American Indian.
"L'Apprenti Sorcier," by Dukas, is
a lively, energetic theme. The rushing
of water is carried by all the violins
in unision and the mystic sorcery by
the drums and horns. The number
ends in a sharp, precise, finale with
the full orchestra. Elgars' familiar
"Pomp and Circumstance" concluded
the evenings program.
Ganz Plays
Rtudolph Ganz, the Swiss pianist,
was greeted with vociferous applause
at the matinee concert.
(Continued on Page Six)

All Appointed Students Affected
Draft Asked to Report to
Headquarters

Two hundred eleven cadets in thel
University R. O. T. C. have been re-
commended by Lieut. George C. Mul-
len to attend the summer training
camp to be held for one month, begin-
ning June 3, at Fort Sheridan, Ill.
The names of 46 alternates, who will
take the places of students unable to
attend camp, were also chosen.
A number of the cadets who have
been recommended have been called
by the draft, or are unable to attend
the camp, and Lieutenant Mullen asks
each student thus affected to notify
him immediately in order that an al-
ternate may be substituted.
With the exception of a few stu-
dents, all the men in the lists are over
21 years of age. Dean Cooley, of the
engineering college, believes that the
older men, who may be called in the
draft in July, August, of September,
ought to have the preference over the
younger students.
"Dean Cooley's, idea is a splendid
one," stated Lieut. Losey J. Williams
yesterday afternoon. "The students
subject to draft in the near future will
be given an excellent opportunity to
obtain the first rudiments of strenuous'
military training before entering a
cantonment camp."
Following are the names of the
cadets recommended for the camp:
Leigh C. Anderson, Henry N. Ander-
son, Sidney E. Anderson, Hans P.
Anderson, Robert C. Angell, Clare
Angell, Farley W. Angell, Edward M.
Apple, Clayton P. Amitage, Lee Ash,
Lincoln Avery, Jr., Will C. Babbitt,
Clifton B. F. Bangs, Johnston Bates,
Clarence H. Barnett, Raymond R.
Beardsley, Harry R. Bell, Rafael Al-
bert Benitz, Herbert M. Bergen,
George U. Birkenstein, Clyde C. Bluil,
Sam C. Bornstein, Curtiss E. Bottum,
Edwin C. Bowers, Jacob M. Braude,
Issac V. Brock, John.D. Brown, Paul
W. Burkholder, Harry T. Brohl, Rus-
sel F. Busha, George S.Burr, and Gil-
bert R. Bryne.
(Continued on Page Five)

EVERY STUDENT EXPECTED
PARTICIPATE IN DEM-
ONSTRATION

THIRD LIBERTY LOAN
TOTALS $4,170,019,650
Washington, May 17.-The total of
the third Liberty Loan is $4,170,019,-
650, an oversubscription of 39 per
cent of the $3,000,000,000 minimum.
The number of subscribers was about
17,000,000,000. Every federal reserve
district oversubscribed.
The total subscriptions to the sec-
ond Loan was $4,616,000,000. Pledges
to the first loan ran about $3,000,000,-
000. In the standing of districts, Chi-
cago occupies seventh place with
$425,000,000 oversubscribed.
Actual receipts from payments on
third Liberty Loan bonds today
amounted to $1,571,407,000, although
only 5 per cent of the total, or $208,-
000,000 is due. This indicates that
many have paid in full.
UN1IVER SITY TO AID IN
BIG RED CROSS' DRIVE

TOI

e unaer
tugs, sc
z of fal

AMERICANS
AID Al

YANKS BON
ON PICAR
TO lOIN

By

,I

in

tion, the moment-they are convinced
Ir that this is the only way to get in-
n creased production.
st FORM COMMITTEES'
FOR UNION DRIVE

All arrangements for the opening
of the $13,000 Red Cross drive on
Tuesday have been completed, and an-
nouncement is made that the faculty,
students, the army mechanics men,
the R. 0. T. C. cadets, and the Univer-
sity band will be included.
University exercises will be sus-
pended at 2 o'clock, so that every'
one will be able to participate. The
cadets are expected to parade as a
part of their regular work, according
to Lieut. G. C. Mullen. The mechanics
men will be under the supervision of
Captain Durkee. Further arrange-
ments of the parade will be announced;
later.
Seniors to Wear Caps and Gowns
All graduates and seniors not in the
R. 0. T. C. are requested to wear caps
and gowns. Another feature of the
parade is to be a number of men
dressed in the different costumes of
the allied nations, with their respec-
tive flags, with Uncle Sam in the lead.
It is asked that all personls having
automobiles decorate them for the pa-
rade, and also that as many houses as
possible be decorated with the red,
white, and blue. The procession will
be 'led by the University band from
State street to Huron street, and then
to main street, where they will be
joined to the city section of the para-
de.
(Continued on Page Four)
PRESIDENT WILSON TO REVIEW
NEW YORK RED CROSS PARADE
New York, May 17.-President Wil-
son came to New York today to re-
view tomorrow the great Red Cross
parade and to open with an address'
tomorrow night-the- Red Cross drive
for $100,000,000. He was met at the
station by Col. and Mrs. House, at
whose home he and Mrs. Wilson dined
tonight before going to the theater.
The president will remain here until
Sunday or Monday.
There was no hint tonight as to the
character of the message the president
would deliver tomorrow night. Aside
from appealing for funds for the Red

ENEMY ACTIVE N
YPRES, SOMME F
Reichenbacker, Auto Rae
Another Enemy Plane;
Reports Lacking
(By Associated Pres
With the American Army
May 17.-The whole Ameri
on the Picardy front was su
heavy bombardment early
ing. The cannonade contini
minutes. There was much
tivity yesterday and tods
-were further indications thi
emy was preparing to renew
sive.
British Attack Beaumont
London, May 17.-"We
a successful attack on
Hamel and captured a few
said Field Marshal Haig's
cation issued this evening.
"This morning a hostile
of Merricks, was rushed by
Its garrison was killed and
"On the remainder of the
is nothing to report beyond
lery activity of both sides.'
Sammies Walt With
The American troops ar
the time when they will be t
the battle on an entirely ne
the battlefield in France.
nouncement that the Stars E
are waiting with the Brii
Jack, and the French Tri-c
that "the Americans were
their training in the area
by the troops which are bl
path of the Germans to ti
ports." This may indicate,
where along the line, from :
Ypres, is the point where Ge
shing's men will once more
Germans.
It is the fifth section of
where the Americans have
ted. The others are east of
northwest of Toul, north of
on the heights of the Meu
the Montdidier sector of tb
battle area.
How many Americans are
behind the British lines is
It is probable that they wil
ded with the British.
Teuton Artillery Incre
During the last day, the
the enemy has been most p
at the pits of the salient d
the Allied lines in the Ypr
Somme fronts. There was a
ble increase in the Germa
'fire on the Lys front, east c
The perfect weather,'of th
days over the western fron
to a number of aerial com
die Richenbacker, the for
mobile race driver, but w
with the American forces o
-front, has added another G

smen wi
lock.
paint
rs and

r

I be continued
-ning on Ferry
1 meet on the
They will re-
representing
wil then pro-
rry field.
Points
the freshmen
yesterday, the
o pionts to-
ints to be giv-
games. The
ave toswin a
ig to tie with

to

ce today because of
nity each possesses
complete games.
3. Hutchins has ex-
issmen from classes
;he games.
ckett, of the health
t Ferry field this
ister first aid to any
injured in the rope
lent council will re-
as the other events.
tacle Races
e held this morning
named, cane spree,
d rope contest. The
on Page Six)

Committees for the $250,000 Union
life membership campaign are now
being organized, with C. T. Van Dus-
en, '19E, at the head. Personal solic-
itation will commence the week of
May 26.
In the meantime, letters will be sent
to all students who do not already own
a full-paid life membership. The so-
licitors will aproach all those who do
not respond to the written appeals.
The $250,000 which the committee
plans to raise will be used to install
in the new building only such appar-
atus and furnishings as are essential
to the building's use by the army me-
chanics. This amount will be expend-
ed for false floors, plumbing and san-
itary facilities, glazing and doors,
kitchen and storehouse fixtures, heat-
ing apparatus, and barracks accom-
modations. All except about 50,000 or
$60,000 worth of this material will
serve both as emergency and perman-
ent equipment.f
FRATERNITY REPRESENTATIVES
HOLD JOINT MEETING SUNDAY
Fraternities which intend to have
booths at the Michigan Union carni-
val have been asked to send one rep-
resentative each to a joint meeting at
9:30 Sunday morning in the -Engi-
neering society's rooms in the Engi-
neering building.
Fraternities that have not made any
previous arrangements may secure in-
formation at the meeting. The com-
mittee in charge will explain the de-
tails and take the names of houses
wishing to have booths. Houses that
fail to send delegates will probably
forfeit their opportunity to partici-
pate.

Rlules- for Spring Contest Today
All members of the freshman and sophomore classes will assemble
at the campus at 9 o'clock this morning, the freshmen at the flag pole
and the sophpmores at Tappan hall.
CANE SPREE
Twenty men of both the freshman and sophomore classes will take
part in the cane spree.
The contest period will last 20 minutes. At the end of that time,
the class having the largest number of canes in its possession will be
awarded one point towards the final total of six points in the entire
spring events.
OBSTACLE RACES
Three teams, ten men on a side, will take part.
Each runner will-have to traverse one-eighth of a mile, vault one
fence, and crawl through one barrel, carrying the banner of his class
over the whole course he runs.
No spiked shoes may be worn by any runner in these races. Ten-
nis shoes or track shoes, only, will be permitted.
One point will be awarded to the class winning two of the three
races,
ROPE CONTEST
The entire freshman and sophomore classes will take part in this
contest.
Both classes will assemble on Ferry field for the contest, 20 feet.
from, the rope.
The contest period will last 20 minutes. One pistol shot will
signify the beginning of the contest. Three pistol shots will mean a
brief halt, but the men are not to drop their holds on the rope. Four
shots will signify that the contest has ended.
Tennis shoes must be worn by all men taking part in the contest.
Kicking or slugging will disqualify a man and he will receive a daub
of yellow paint and be denied further participation in the contest.
The decision will be awarded' to the class having the largest number
of men holding on to the rope at the end of the contest period.
The winning of the contest will give to either class one point
towards the final total of six points in the entire spring events.

Cross, it was believed -he might take # chine to his record.

* * *

* * *1

occasion to touch on the international
situation.
AMERICANS REACH FLANDERS;
- WILL AID BRITISH TROOPS'
Washington, May 17.- Evidence of
the success of emergency measures
to bring American man power to the
aid of the French and British army
in repelling the German drive came to-
day with the announcement that Ame-
rican troops have reached Flanders
and. have. gone into training beyond
the British lines there. Official re-
ports were lacking tonight but Secre-
tary Baker and army officials expected
press advices that the first contingent
of the forces to be brigaded for train-
ing and operations with the British
army.
Austrian Emperor Leaves for Turkey
Vienna; May 17.-Emperor Charles
and the Emperess left the Austrian
capital for Sofia and Constantinople
to visit King Ferdinand of Bulgaria
and the Sultan of Turkey. They were

French Launch Raiding
All along this front in
tension under under whic
are working, has been r
the large number of tree
forays. Nowhere has th
conflict which might be
more than a skirmish.
been no further reports,
or Vienna, relative to the
on the Italian front.
A summary of the situa
western front, given out by
general staff, states that a
rifle attack by the German
ent.
Harvard Plans for Big C
Cambridge, Mass., May
vard is making elaborate p
Class Day this year, as -
a general reunion and a
men now in service are r
Cambridge for the occasio

*
[BUTION *
ATIONS *
*
their in-'*
lock this *
.1 by pre-. *
ch were *
ins were *
+ho ^nl *

Christiania Buys First Whale Mea
Christiania, May 17.-A number
whales caught on the west coast
Norway have supplied the first wha
meat ever offered on the open mark
in Christiania for human food. T
meat, to a total of several tons, w

it
of
of

ale The games in the spring events will count as follows: Each tug-
iet o'-war contest, one point; cane spree, one point; majority of the ob-
he stacle races, one point; rope contest, one point; total, six points. The
-as class winning the largest number of these games will be adjudged the
DIM victor in the spring games.

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