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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 15, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

l.T&.L....Z 1- i~Vl.& -3L j

its

NETS

PAN AMAS
LEGHORNS

$7.00

&Co.

- Two Stores

- Main Street

YOU VCAN PIIOE US TO CALL
for your flannel coat, house coat,
lounging robe, gloves, evening clothes
or anything else in your wardrobe, ex-
cept shoes, aid we wilj send for them
and after dry cleaning them by our
special process, return them to you
spick, span, immaculate and faultless.
Wise men employ us regularly to keep
their wardrobe looking new all the
time. They save a lot of moiey by
their wisdom.
ANN ARBOR STEAM
DYE WORKS

FOR
EVERYTHING
ELECTRICAL
No Job too Small or too Large
WASHTENAW
ELECTRIC SHOP
"The Shop of Quality"
If it's not right we make it right
SPHONE 273=-

J,

PHILIPPINES HELP U. S.
TO WIN WAR - CANTERA
TROOPS TO BE SENT HRE SOON
TO RECEIVE FINAL
INSTRUCTION
Natives of the Phillippine islands
are doing their part in the war, ac-I
cording to Prof. F. de la Cantera, of
the University of the Phillippines, who
left Ann Arbor last night after a two-
day visit at the University.
Professor de la Cantera, who is
making a tour of American universi-
'ties to get new ideas on educationalI
methods, says that the Filipino are
heartily in sympathy with our prose-
cution of the war.
U. S. TIkes Part of Weak Nations
"We feel that the United States went
into this war to take the part of the
small and -weak countries of thet
world," he said, "and being a small
country we feel that America is fight-
ing to protect us as well as the others."
According to Professor de la Can-
tera, 30,000 Filipinos, comprising the
Phillippine National guard, are in
training in various army camps in
the islands, and will be sent to this
country within a few months to re-
ceive their final instruction.
Students Take Drill
The 3,000 students of the Un'ver-
sity of the Phillipines are all taking
military drill similar to that which
is being given here, and the women of
the university have formed a Red
Cross unit which has become profici-
ent in marching as well.
In discussing the university's Red
Cross activities, Professor de la Can-
tera told of the work done by Dean
C. G. Wrentmore, '93, and Mrs. Wrent-
more. Dean Wrentmore, who was
formerly a member of the University
factilty, is now deai of the engineer-
ing college of the Phillippine institu-
tion. Mrs. Wrentmore raised $20,-
000 for the Red Cross in one week dur-
ing the recent campaign for funds.
Graduate of Cornell
Professor de la Cantera graduated
from Cornell university in 1915 and
after practicing engineering in the
states one year, he returned to the
Phillippines to take up his work as
professor of engineering at the uni-
versity there He was sent to this
country last March to inspect the
prominent engineering colleges and
their methods of instruction, and will
visit Cornell, Columbia, Massachusetts
Institute of Technology, and Leland
Stanford university before going back
to Manila in June.
While here, Professor de la Cantera
witnessed a drill of the R. 0. T. C. on
Ferry field and was especially inter-
ested in the grenade-throwing classes.
"You have a wonderful university
here," he said before leaving, "and
your faculty have been so hospitable
that it did not seem that my home was
thousands of miles away."
NEED 100 ENGINEERS A) LIT
STUDENTS FOR SUMMER WORK
Engineers and literary students are
included in a request for 100 men to
work during the summer months with
the IZtern Electric company at
Hawthor:, Ill.
The company, . according to Prof.
John C. Parker, of the engineering]
college, to whom the request was
made, needs men having knowledge of
business administration for positions
in the clerical division. Mechanical

engineers are wanted for work in the
company's shops, where telephones
and other electrical apparatus are be-
ing assembled, and the technical divi-
sion of the company offers a promising
field for electrical engineering stud-
ents. . .
"It is national service;" said Pro-
fessor Parker yesterday in comment-
ing on the work being done by the
company. "The Western Electric
company is engaged in manufacturing
wireless equipment for our merchant
and war ships and is making signal
apparatus for the army and navy. It
is also helping many of the newer war
industries. Students accepting this
offer will be performing a service to
the country."
Dancing Friday and Saturday nights
at the Armory.-Adv

DIRECTION OF SELL IS
DETERMINED BY WHISTLE
FIRMG LIGHTS UP SKY LIKE
LIGHTNING FLASHES SAYS
SMITH, EX-'19E
That a soldier soon gets used to
telling where a shell will go because
of the way it whistles, is' the state-
ment of H. D. Smith, ex-'19E, in a
letter written to S. P. Tobias, '19t.
,"You soon get used to the shells,"
says Smith, "and unless there is a pre-
mature explosion you are as safe as
in your own back yard, and just let
them shoot oyer your head.
"At night the firing is very pretty,
as it lights the sky up-like lightning.
I also like to see them try to shoot
airplanes down. It is very seldom
that they get one, as I have seen them
shoot at hundreds, and only once did
one fall."
Has Charge of Switchlboard
Smith is in charge of a switch-
board, and with two others occupies
a dug-out near the front line trench-
es. The dug-outs are much more com-
fortable than he had imagined them
to be, he says, being like rooms under
the ground, covered over with logs
and stones very carefully camouflaged.
They never leave the dug-out, and at
meal time, one of them goes back
to the main line and brings something
out to the other two.
"I could gather enough souvenirs in
a few minutes to supply all the folks
back home," continues the letter.
"There are hundreds of them, as both
the French and the Germans have
been over this ground."
likterested in IL . 01T C
Smith was .much interested in the
men now in training in the Univer-
sity, and asked for news of them.
He also asked that a Daily be sent to/
the boys once in a while, as they were
all anxious to hear what was going on
around the campus.
"I am not allowed to tell you where
we are," he concluded, "but you chn
guess by watching the newspapers."
The letter head tells no information
as to the whereabouts of the army. It
merely says that the writer is on "ac-
tive service with the American exped-
itionary force," and in. a corner of the
letter-head appears the Y. M. C. A.
stamp.
TRAINED MEN ARE
ESSENTIAL IN WAR
For nearly a year there has been
much public discussion of the proper
function of colleges and of the duty of
college students in the present em-
erge cy. Last July President Wilson
said: N
"It would seriously impair America's
prospects of success in this war if the
supply of highly trained men were
unnecessarily diminished. There will
be need for a larger.number of persons
expert in the various fields of applied
science than ever before * * * I there-
fore have no hesitation in urging col-
leges and technical schools tp endeav-
or to maintain their courses as far as
possible on the usual basis *** Those
who fall below the age of selective
conscription and who do not enlist
may feel that by pursuing their cours-
es with earnestness and diligence they
also are preparing themselves for
valuable services to the nation."
- The vital contribution of the colleges
is now formally recognized in an an-
nouncement just issued by the secre-
tary of war. As a military measure
the colleges of the country are by this

announcement officially designated as
training centers for the United States
army. The announcement follows:
"In order to provide military in-
struction for the college students of
the country during the present emer-
gency a comprehensive plan will be
put in effect by the war department,
beginning with the next college year,
in September, 1918. The details re-1
main to be worked out, but in general
the plan will be as follows:
Military instruction under officers
and non-commissioned officers of the
army will be provided in every insti-
tution of college grade, which enrolls
for the instruction 100 or more able-
bodied students over the age of 18.
The necessary military equipment
will, so far as possible, be provided by
the government. There will be creat-
ed a military training unit in each

Neckties an Shi
Men's Furnishings
Varsity Toggery Shop
.1107 S. University Ave.

Calkins
Drug
Co.

Vest Pocket Kodak
is still the most popular model
Have you seen the new F 6.A
at $20.00 Come in.

The little

Eat a P'late of OU( Ice Cred
Ice Cream is food if it's made from pure and fresh
Ours is. We know it because we make it.

Fountain of Youth
Corner State and Liberty
YOUR SPRING SUIT
will be carefully tailored of the new d
pendable fabrics.
New Models distinctly our own.

.

GOLF SUITS

RIbING BREE

"Snappy New"

1

I

200 E. Washington
Ann Arbor.

117 Pearl
Ypsilanti

ID. E. Grennan
The Custom Tailor 606 E.

Try our Chop Suey
Chinese and American Dishes
WAI HING LOO .
Joe Gin, Prop. .

good
on

314 S.State St.

Phone 1244-M1

LAW SCHOOL EXPECTS LAIO I}"
, ATTENDANCE DURING S31IER
According to the opinion of mem-
bers of the-faculty, the coming sum-
mer session should find the Law school

es of service
r'IRE &
,BER CO.
n, V ich.

No' SeFountain
$ Watern
RMMdan aand Co
. Jewelry
r & SeyfrlF
'Y SHOP
-owe. Shampoos
age and Chirop
Detroit St. Ph
r appointment.

the largest in the country. The large
eastern schools seem to be affected
by the war even more seriously than
the local institution, and hardly ex-
pect more than a minimum attendance
as a result.
Pens Although a normal attendance is
man hardly expected here, indications seem
nKln to point to a relatively large enroll-
ment as many inquiries concerningI
the summer session are being re-
e d ceived daily. The usual courses will
be offered, and students are being
urged to spend the summer in attend-
ance. Many have already signifiedI
their intentions of remaining for the
ody. summer, and a large enrollment of
one practicing attorneys who are desirous'
386 of pursuing advanced studies, is also
expected.

institution. Enlistment will be pure-
ly voluntary but all students over the
age of 18 will be encouraged to en-]
list. The enlistment will constitute
the student a member of the army of
the United States, liable to active duty
at the call of the President. It will,
however, be the policy of the govern-
ment not to call the members of the
training units to active duty until
they have reached the age of 21, un-
less urgent military necessity compels
an earlier call. Students under 18
and therefore not legally eligible for
enlistment, will be encouraged to en-
roll in the training units. Provisions
will be made for co-ordinating the
reserve officers' training corps sys-
tem, which existstingabout one-third
of the collegiate institutions with this
broader plan.
This new policy aims to accomplish
a two-fold object: First to develop
as a great military asset the large
body of young men in the colleges; and
second, to prevent unnecessary and
wasteful depletion of the colleges
through indiscrimate volunteering by
offering to the students a definite and
immediate military status.
Later announcement will be made of
the detail' of the new system. In the
meantime, presidents of collegiate in-
stitutions are requested to call this
matter to the attention Rf all, their.
students. . Those who do not graduate
this spring should be urged to contin-
ue their education and take advantage
of this new opportunity to serve the
Nation."

1

Nursing offers towc
tunity for patriotic ser,
preparation for life and
broad social usefulness.
Washington Universit
yqars'ciours n Nursn,
yer'cus nNriinstruction is given in
clinical instruction in t
Barnest and St., Louis
pitals, Washington Un
sary and Social Servi
Six months' credit isc
cants having an A.B.
from this college.
.Address inquiries to
Nurses, Barnes IHosp
Kingshighway, St. Lou

.

Realize for yourself
pleasure of Home Cooi
Food. Prices Reasonai
Service Paramount.

IWASiHIN
SCHOOL

,As, -I .

TRUB
218 S. Main

Good Lunches of R
10C all-th
Chinese and Ame rica

Michigan Inn

II
*1

IN1L

Leave Copy
at
Students'
Supply Store

Your Spring

will give

wo Festival tickets,
Thursday evening and
oon. Phone 1951.
vo May Festiva tickets
from front, first bal-
orley, 1 .462-.
ne May Festival ticket
ies of concerts. Phone
stival tickets for single
ne seats, main floor.
free Festival tickets for
1 collectively or sop-
251.

WA[TFD
WANTED-Man fast on typewriter to
take Associated Press dispatches
over phone at The Daily every oth-
er night. See or call Roeser at The,
Daily office between 3 and 3:30 o'-
clock today.
WANTED-Young lady to work during
the summer in connection with a
Nation-wide Educational Movement.
Phone 359-M. $
WANTED- Three student waiters.
Michigan Union.
LOST
LOST-Pocketbook in Waterman Gym-
nasium with name, C. E. Gehring,
stamped on same. Kindly call
2161-R. Reward.
LOST-Between Liberty St. and Cam-

IPASSENGERS TO PAY AIRPLANE
FARES ON BASIS OF WEIGHT
Washington, May 14.-Patrons of an
airplane passenger and mail service to
be established in the Caribbean sea
after the war will be required to pay
fare on a basis of weight.
The project, which is said to have,
the sanction of the British govern-
ment and the backing of London capi-
talists, provides for the transportation
of passengers, mail and light freight
between Key West, Fla. and the is-
land of Tinidad, off the northeast
coast of South America.
Intermediate landing depots would,
be established at Barbados, St. Kitts,
Porto Rico,-Jamaica and Cuba. Hydro-
airplanes would be 'used for the trip
which, it is estimated, would take five
days..

WELL-DRESSED

if7

AF#

OFFICERS'
UNIFORMS

516 E. William St.

k A

Just received a complete new stock of
VICT ROLAS

U. of M. Jewe
Is twe place. 1
Dancing Frid
at the Armory.
Buy your ala
Charpman's, 3J
Adv.

Priecs from $20.00 to $400.00

Golden Oaks, Weathered Oaks, Fumed Oaks English Brown
and Mahogany.,
GRINNELL BROS., 116 S. Main St.

Cla..

Dl ancing Mond

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