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October 17, 1917 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY,

OCTOBER 17, 19

J.

Real Orient - Mlysterious and
Uncanny - Found on Campus

Before a Jury
You know that your appearance is always on
trial. Every man you meet is both judge and
jury of how you look.
Are you guilty of a faulty selection in your
clothes? Do poor fitting clothes stand against
you?
If so, why not acquit yourself, win the verdict
and be declared a good dresser?
Let us become your tailoring counsel-we'll
win you that verdict if we make your clothes.'
DRESS SUITS FOR HIRE
SHIRTS TO ORDER
KARL MALC OLM

Text-Books and Supplies
For all Courses

604 East Liberty St.

Malcolm Block

.. ..

;I

ARCADE JEWELER

CARL F. BAY

Fine Watch and Jewelry Repairing

Phone 152-W

NICKELS ARCADE
J1

NOTICE
Students Taking the New 7iltary Course
Order Your Flannel Army Shirt Of Us
Orders placed with us will be filled at $3.00 per shirt, if placed.
Immediately
SAMPLES ARE NOW ON DISPLAY
Prices subject to change without' notice
Tinker & Coo
Clothes, Haberdashery and Hats
342 S. State Street at William Street

Mr. Freshman: Have you ever won-
dered why Coach Yost's crew of foot-
ballers wear the title of "Wolverines"
whn opposing a gridiron enemy of
Michigan's? Do you know that there
is a real Orient not over a minute's
walk from the Library, where fresh-
men are not only not prohibited from
going, but are even invited? Do you
know that the most gorgeously col-
ored product of human manufacture is
as plain as a frosh "pot," compared to
objects of nature's coloring, right here
on Michigan's campus? And could
you tell whence sprung the first of
the flood of tortoise shell glasses that
now add humour to the situation
around here?
If you don't know these things give
that news habit a little exercise, of
finding out unknown quantities right
away There's nothing mysterious
about the method necessary,-just
roam into that gray building north
of Tappan hall with the sign "Open
to Public 3-5:30" any time within
those hours, don't back out with fear
when you see something big and bony
confronting you, but keep on going.
This is an ideal place to spring a
little time to bring back one's joy in
living, after "getting hit" in one of
those bi-monthly, combined section
quizzes in English history, "Tappan
Hawl."
Mastodon a Hair Raiser
Probably the first eye-opener here
will alo take on the form of a hair-
raiser. It's a specimen of Mastodon
Americanus, a product of our locality,
and was born and brought up, as it
were, near Ypsilanti. But the latter
statement is merely a supposition
based on the facts that it was dug
up by a farmer from some swampy
ground near Ypsi, and because of the
voluminity of its skull. In life this
animal was taller than two "Tad"
Weimans and was as long as a bowl-
ing alley. But growing tired of the
increasing smallness of things, it died
long before Ann Arbor started spend-
ing its Sundays at Ypsi. Now we
have to accept the estimates of zo-
ologists instead of first hand inspec-
tion. To gaze upon the specimens of
a far distant age is to bring upon one
feelings that he ought t be out cut-
ting wood with a clumsy stone hatchet
to build a fire in his cave and keep all
the little caveites warm, or be out
chasing a wild deer with a small sized
boulder in his hand and murder in
his eye. In fact, one starts to button
his sheepskin a little closer as the
pre-historic atmosphere impresses it-
self stronger and stronger upon him.
Placed in life-like positions in cases
near the mastodon are skeletons of
gorillas, both mammoth and little
ones, fox squirrels, everlasting ape,
Romanic chimpanzee, and the lowly
spider monkey. These masters of
mimicry are confronted on the other
side by a case full of attractively col-
ored birds.
A "Wolverine" In Museum
On the second floor we find every
kind of bird known to time, present
or past, except the mechanical bird,
and the one who flies for cement walls
and iron bars with the first strong
suggestion of cold days and poor
pasturage ahead. Here also is found
the answer to the first question of
this text-a Wolverine, the trademark
of Michigan, stands in a great corner
ease with other creatures of Michigan
woods.
Two great specimens of the deer
family, a male and female moose,
stand in characteristic poses here, the
male with head held high as though
listening, female with head lower and
expression almost domesticated. Frost
colored leaves, dead branches, and
scattered stone upon the floor of the

cage serve to dispell the museum feel-
ing, and to give the animals a native
lair background that is irresistable. A
person will find himself whirling
about several times, as he walks away,
to convince himself that there most
certainly was not just the semblance
of a movement in those large eyes, or
a little twitch in one of those thigh
muscles.M
Are the Deer AlivelI
These famous rules of the north
woods are so perfectly mounted that
such thoughts do actually occur if one
You can get those Neolin Soles put
on at Paul's Place, 611 E. William,
while you wait.-Adv.

watches them steadily for a few mo-
ments. Herein lies an art that is not1
overrun by masters.
The taxidermist is given the hide,
to make with it a full sized animal,
proportion and shape absolutely true
to life. The hide has been tanned and
washed on the inside with arsencial
soap and is in the same condition that
the fur is from which are made ar-
ticles of wear. If the exact measure-
ments were not taken by the hunter
before the animal was skinned, the
taxidermist has to figure them out by'
means of the hide, and then build
body and legs to fit. One does not'
need to know much about zoology to'
realize that no amateur bungler could
put in the natural curves character-
istic of the animal in life.
Standing with bloody mouth over its
victim, a young deer, is the fiercely
aggressive form of a grey timber wolf,
once such a terror to lonely travelers
in the early days of pioneering.
A huge skeleton occupying another
case nearby suggests the animal tent
in a great circus, and particularly the
great red wagon wherein dwells the
mighty hippo, cause of many a droop-
ing stomach, and awed gaze. Here he
is, with every rib showing, biggest
complete skeleton in the museum.
Scattered about are scores of other
highly interesting mammal and bird
displays, some of extinct species, and
others of great scarcity. One of these,
a Dimetrodden Incisivus Cope, whose
first name sounds pleasantly like a
United States mint, hails from the
rather wierdly named "Briar Creed
Bone Bed," Texas, and is known in
speakable language as a fin backed
lizard. It boasts a great fin grown
out upon its back in the shape of a
badly worn palm leaf fan, whose size
suggests the mammouth fan that the
ancients believed was used to incite
the north and south, east and west
winds.
Bear Nearly Devours Man
But leaving behind the mammals we
hunt for the elevator again, and again
we forego that absent convenience and
climb up into what looks from all the
Chinese lanterns and woodcarvings
hanging about like a metropolitan
chop suey. We pass right by a huge
bear in the final scene of devouring a
man and walk on unconcerned, be-
cause they are only wood, you know.
At the top of the stairs is a display
of ancient pottery made by the In-
dians of southwestern United States
and of Mexico.
In a room open to students of zo-
ology are cases of unmounted speci-
mens and birds. It is here are found
the colors in the plumage of tropical
birds and of our own humming birds
that no master of art could ever rival.
Every angle from which these won-'
derful little birds are inspected dis-
covers new shades of color.
On the south side of the third floor,
enter the Orient. No swinging doors
here, no backward glance and forward
lunge. And 'tis here another problem
is solved, to-wit: "Who Wore Them
Glasses?"
Chess Game in Orient
Behold, a rum game, is the first
thoug t that hustles across one's mind
as his glance falls upon two person-
ages seen facing each other at a table,
both apparently deliberating whether
to chance it all on one splurge or play
it safe. Closer inspection reveals a
Chinese Mandarin, a military officer,
manuevering his corporal's crew of
chess-men in battle with a correspond-
ing force under the leadership of a
so-named "student of literature," upon
whom repose the Adam and Eve pair
of tortoise shell masks, so popular

hereabout.
As these two contestants are not
on the point of exchanging cards as
we first suspected we move on to
Dancing from 9 to 12 every Satur-
day night at Armory.-Adv.

I

i i

H AND COLORED PRINTS AND ENLARGEMENTS

PHONE 600 OPEN EVEN IN C S PHONE 600
ARCADE FLORAL SHOP
NICKELS ARCADE OPPOSITE SUB-POST OFFICE

Flower Department
A COMPLETE STOCK OF
FLOWERS FOR ALL
OCCASIONS
FLOWERING PLANTS
CULPER POTTE Y
CORSAGES A SPECIALTY

Bull Dogs Mraul
Truant Officer
After facing six bull dogs it isn't
surprising that Waldamar Peterson is
permanently disabled.
As a truant officer for the city of
Milwaukee, Mr. Peterson was within
his right when he ascended the back
stairs at 921 Island avenue, in search
of defaulting genius, but the peevish
canines on guard mistook him for an
intruder and proceeded to show their
dislike for such. The dogs certainly
displayed good team work for ac-
cording to the victim they all attack-
ed at once, tripped him up and landed
him downstairs.
The Wisconsin industrial commis--
sion is investigating his case.
U. of M. Jewelry. J. L. Chapman's
is the place. 113 S. Main.-Adv.

BAND WITHOUT MANAGER; NO
PLANS MADE FOR 1917 BOUNCE
No arrangements have yet been
made for a Band Bounce, though Capt.
Wilfred Wilson states that there will
be one later in the fall.
At present the band has no business
manager. Dr. J. B. Wahr, formerly
of the German department, who was
manager last year, was drafted and
is now in the government service. No
one has been appointed to take his
place as yet.
Captain Wilson has been doing the
business manager's work thus far,
but states that he cannot give enough
time to both direct and manage the
band. For this reason nothing has
been done about a Band Bounce.
Captain Wilson expects a successor
to Dr. Wahr will be appointed in the
near future.
Subscribe for the Michigan Daily.

s
E
R
V
1
G
E

Kodak Department
EASTMAN KODAKS.
FILMS AND SUPPLIES
KODAK FINISHING OUR SP$CI-
ALTY - EIGHT HOUR SERVICE
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
DEV. 10c PRINTS S; 4, Sc

WE SUPPLY EVERY STUDENTS' NEED

Sheehan & Co.
Ann Arbor Detroit

""

where the "blooming idol made o'
mud" with his sunset tinted features
and long sooty beard sits in state. An
indescribable crown of intermingled
gold, green and white stones, and
empty atmosphere throws about him
an air of wealth and royalty.
Korean Ziggie Also There
There are hundreds of other in-
tensely interesting sights of great
educational work in this room. Here
is shown the Korean Ziggie, the most
scientific packing frame for carrying
enormous loads that man has ever in-
vented to put upon himself.
The collection of these thousands of
specimens of bygone and present day
life and art have been accomplished
by the generosity of Michigan alumni,
other students of zoology, and for the
most part by the efforts of the 'Uni-
versity itself. Norman A. Wood, cur-
ator of birds, in charge of the museum,
every summer conducts expeditions to
points on the Great Lakes and adds
hundreds of valuable specimens to the
stock now on hand.
Mr. Wood tells many interesting
stories of his experiences in shooting
birds while they are "migrating. Great
flocks fly north every year over Michi-
gan towards Canada, avoiding the wide
expanse of intervening water as much
as possible by going around over
White Fish point, the part of Michi-
gan nearest the Dominion. Here Mr.
Wood has brought down scores of
birds in a short time.
It is not possible for every county
seattand nearest big town in the coun-
try to collect for and maintain an in-
stitution comparable to the University
Museum, so Mr. Freshman, start now,
take your friend with you, and inside
of a few weeks you will be following
the crowd there.
FIVE OFFICERS AND 51 MEN
LOST ON BRITISH CRUISER
London, Oct. 15.-The British armed
mercantile cruiser Champaigne has
been sunk, and the mine sweeping
sloop Begonia is overdue and regard-
ed as lost, says an official statement
issued tonight. Five officers and 51
men of the Champaigne were lost, the
statement adds.
Detroit Nieedy Families First Supplied
Young women clerks will be placed
on duty at each station house in De-
troit for listing and indexing the coal
requirements of every resident of their
precinct who makes his needs known.
Families who have no coal will, of
course, be given preference by the
administrator, their orders being the
first on the list of those whom Mr.
Couzens will direct the dealers to pro-
vide with fuel.
Recreation makes for Efficiency.
"We try to treat you right." Huston
Bros.-Adv. tf.

I

WHAT'S GOING ON

TODAY
3:35 o'clock - Michigan-University
of Detroit game on Ferry field.
7 o'clock-Engineer smoker at
Michigan Union.
7:30 o'clock-University Christian
Science society meets in Newberry
hall.
TOMORROW
9:30 o'clock-Senior dental class
meets in Dental building.
10:30 o'clock-Senior engineer as-
sembly in room 348, Engineering
building.
U-NOTICES
Organization of the All-frqsh Glee
club will be completed at a meeting
at 7 o'clock tonight in the School of
Music. All members should bring a
copy of the new Michigan song book
with them.
The Varsity band will meet at d
o'clock this afternoon in front of Uni-
versity hall.
Round-up dance at Packard acad-
emy at 8:30 o'clock, Oct. 19.
Shell Expert to Give Movie Lmeturs
"The Making of High Explosive
Howitzer Shells," is the topic of a
movie lecture to be given by Chester
Lucas of the Machinery Magazine to-
morrow evening in the auditorium of
the Natural Science building.
Several reels of motion pictures de-
pict the manufacture of these power-
ful shells. The picture was filmed in
one of the large eastern factories now
under contract for the United States
government.
Freshmen at the University of
Utah must don distinguishing head-
gear, according to campus rules or
they will be "properly taken care of"
by the executive board.

;.

DASH WOOD
N EW
LAPEL
FRONT
&f~5~iiars
CARL WILSOPoll/Cs
TROYS BEST PRODUCT

I

U

We have just received a large
range of

Collar Attached Shirts

and solicit your
inspection

Buy your alarm clocks at
Chapman's. Jeweler. 113 8.
-AdT,.

J. L,~
Mein.

.

3

I - We are the only

Wadhams & Co.
TWO STORES
STATE STREET . MAIN STREET
COR. ARCA PE COR. WASHINGTON

Students'

Supply

Store

Fix up Your Room now.
Pillol Tops

We hake Michigan Pennants, Banners and
Come in and Look over Our Stock

Films Dbeloped for oc

111 S. University Aber

..

SATURDAY

M. A. C.

Vs.

MICHIGAN

OCTOBER 20

SPECIAL TABLE D'HOTE TURKEY DINNER

Served from
5 PO M. till 8 P. me

DEL

TA

CAFE

Please make Reserv
Phone 817 M

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