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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 17, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r E~7, r 17. THE MICHIGAN DAILY ___________

rJc mAN7MEN a 1HWHU AEGONE TOI FIGHT' FOR -FREEOM ANO DEMOCRACY
MAIZE AND BLUE WILL P. T., '18E, Great Lakes training sta-
FACE TEUTON ILINES tion; Westbrook, H. G., '18E, Camp
Custer, Battle Creek; Bessay, Robert,
20, Camp Sheridan, Ill.; West, John,
Editor's note:- This is the last of 20E, first lieutenant, marines, France.
the series of nanes of Michigan men
in the service of their co ntry.9 r >

lb.

Calkins
Drug
Co.

There is real quality
in Whitman's Candies.
That is why we sell so
many of them

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o18 dance corps; Wohl, Earold
2 orduace corp; ,Weaver,
Th r6D,.6F; seco t1d i 4tnant, en-
, AeAin ttle cre k; Walsb, Edward
P., '17, ordnance department; Weston,
an ik ) ambu~lanice service; Wat-
kinsJ. R., '15-'17L, seaman; Wocester,
Ted, M18, seaman, Don Juan de Auis-
,i i , 'e'ler R. '., '17, seaman;
Al t6ie, S. H., '19, electrician, third
clas; Wilson, D. E., '18, seaman; Wil-
QD 1? W.1N;; '11 , ambulance . corps;
Wilt, Glen A., '19, first U. of M. am-
1, '19, U. S.
:&xdessex S.-N.RF.; Webster, J.
pflati 1 rm; Wurster, F. R.,
61io r4r Don Juan de Austria;
Waddell, Rex, national army; Wheat,
R., national army; Willard, A. W., '18,
U. S. navy, Newport; Wood, Scott W.,
'06, lieutenant, U. S. army; Wilkins,
Ross F., '18L, base hospital No. 36,
U. S. R., Detroit, Mich.; Wood, Barton,
'13A, engineering corps; White, Prof.
A. E., engineering school, captain, ord-
ance department, Washington; Whel-
an, L. P., O. R. C., Ft. Logan; Winans,
L. K., naval militia, Wooster, Mass.;
Whitmire, L. J., '15D, dental corps;
Willitts,' Chas. M., '17L, ordnance de-
partment; Wormwood, F. F., '13, first
lieutenant, national army; Warner, H.
D., '16E,, lieutenant, national army;
Wenley, A. G., '20, naval reserves.
Wesley, Kenneth C., '17, first U.of
M. ambulance corps, France; White,
H. K., '17, government efficiency corps,
Chicago; Wilkinson, M. N., '18, med-
ical reserve corps; Woodlock, Dr. L.
A., first lieutenant, Second Michigan
ambulance corps; Woods, J. W. R.,
navy; Wolcott, Dr. C. C., assistant
surgeon, U. S. naval reserves; Woods,
R. V., Ft. Sheridan, Ill.; Wiener, Ft.
Logan; Wolfe, G. B., Michigan. naval
militia; Weaver, Chas., ambulance
corps, Allentown, Pa.; Woods, R. J.,
Canadian army; Whitney, L. C., quar-
termaster department, Ann Arbor;
Walker, Karl F., '17, engineer corps,
mortar division, Washington; Wilson,
Conson C., '17, quartermaster depart-
ment; Wickwire, J. S., '18, quarter-
master department; Weinstein, Henry,
first lieutenant, aviation section, Day-
ton, O.; Wolcott, Dr. C. C., '17H, lieu-
tenapt, U. S. navy; Whitford, S. J., in
military band; White, D. K., in mili-
tary band; Walker, W. H., '20E, avia-
tion corps; Watts, Owen J., '18-21L,
second lieutenant, Ft. Lion Springs,
Tex.; Wahr, Dr. Fred B., literary
school, national army, Camp Custer;
White, Prof. Alfred, captain, office of
chief of ordnance; Wehmeyer, Karl L.,
'18, first lieutenant, ambulance unit,
Allentown, Pa.; Wells, G. B., ordnance
corps, national army; Wilson, S. B.,
'15, second lieutenant, infantry; Wat-
kins, J. K., captain, field artillery, O.
R. C.; Wurzburg, D. B., aviation sec-
tion, S. O. R. C., Cairo, Egypt; Wil-
liams, S. R., R. O. T. C., Ft. Sheridan,
Ill.; Wickles, A. H., captain, U. S. R.
O. C., Camp Custer, Battle Creek; Wil-
son, Percival, '19; Wiley, Chas. D.,
Section 21, U. S. A. A. C.
Y
Yoakum, Emile B., national army,
Camp Funston, Kan.; Yerkes, R., '20,
naval reserves; Yeisley, C. T., '17, sea-
man.
Z

InPrearenss
Lays in Supply of Postage Stamps Be-
fore They o Up to
T!hree Cent
A-gawky, red-haired and be-
spectacled, frosh youth from the wilds
of Kokomo dashed madly into the
postal station, narrowly avoiding a
collision with some girls, and the
parcel post line at the window.
"Gimme three dollars worth of two-
cent stamps," was the breathless re-
quest to the astonished postal clerk.
"Aren't you using a great many
stamps, young man?" was the query
as the frosh stowed away the red
seals.
"No, thought I would put in a good
supply before they went up to three
cents apiece."
Engineering News
First upperclass assemblies will be
held Thursday morning, the sopho-
mores meeting at 8:30 o'clock, the
juniors at 9:30 o'cln.k and the sen-
iors at 10:30 o'clock. The senior as-
sembly will be confined to a business
meeting but a program has been ar-
ranged for the juniors and sopho-
mores.
Permanent seats will not be as-
signed until after the meetings Tues-
day, to give students opportunity to
figuie out in which assembly they be-
long. The following limits for each
section, based on hours of credit,
have been issued by the faculty and
should be observed.
Freshman assembly: Entering first
semester of first year with 23 hours or
less of credit. Entering second semes-
ter of first year with 41 hours or less
of credit.
Sophomore assembly: Entering
first semester of second year with
from 24 to 59 hours of credit. Enter-
ing second semester of second year
with from 42 to 77 hours of credit.
Junior assembly: Entering first
semester of third year with from 60
to 96 hours of credit. Entering second
semester of third year with from 78 to
113 hours of credit.
Senior assembly: Entering first
semester of fourth year with 96 hours
of credit or excess.
When a student becomes identified
with an assembly he belongs to the
class it represents. He must attend
regularly and the only excuse for ab-
sence accepted, will be a written ex-
cuse from an instructor or from a
physician stating that attendance was
impossible.
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley will ad-
dress the junior assembly and F. A.
Bacon, '02, of the Michigan Union, the
sophomore meeting.
Mentors of the classes, Prof. H. E.
Riggs, C. T. Johnson, and H. B. Mer-
rick, will outline plans for the year.
Elaborate preparations have been
made by the committee of the Engin-
eering society in charge of the All-
engineering smoker to be held tonight
at the Union, as the largest crowd
that ever turned out for the engineer-
ing function is expected. The program
will include an address by Dean Mort-
imer E. Cooley. The best campus mu-

r1

COACH YOST DID HIS DUTY, HAVE YOU DONE YOURS?

324 So. State St. South U and Church St.

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FINEST MADE-TO-MEASURE
CLOTHES
Everything that is new in wool-
ens and in fashions is shown in the
big line and we know that you
will be impressed with the display.
$18-$20-$25-$30
FURNISHINGS
FRESH CAPS
VARSITY TOGGERY SHOP

EDESCO

Hurry-UpYost
Slaps the Kaiser
"Tickled to death," was Coach
Yost's reply to Daniel and Hudson
Martin, members of Troop No. 4, Ann
Arbor Boy Scouts, when they asked
him to sign up for Liberty bonds.
"Hurry up, fellows," called the
coach to his crew as they stood scat-
tered around Ferry field waiting for
him, "C'mon over, I'm going to buy a
bond."
And he did. He nearly took the.
scouts' breath away by subscribing for
$2,000 worth of the loan.
Masonic Volumes Added to Library
About 300 volumes and 500 pamph-
lets, dealing largely with Masonic
proceedings of Michigan, have been
presented to the Library by Mr. 0. L.
Spaulding of Washington. Mr. Spauld-
ing was a Regent of the University in
1860.
DETROIT DEALERS DICTATE
ANN ARBOR MILK PRICES
"Detroit dealers control the milk
supply for Ann Arbor and it is as
they dictate that prices go up or
down," declared Wurster Bros., of
the City Creamery, when asked about
rumors of a possible further increase
in milk rates.
One of the brothers said that in his
opinion milk would not reach any
higher price this year. "That all de-
pends upon the action of the Detroit
dealers, who have full control of the
market," he continued. "The local
dealers can never tell when some De-
troit dealer will come down and buy
up the entire supply and it is for this
reason that Ann Arbor dealers can
not act independently of them."
1ICIIGAN MAN NOW ASSISTANT
SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY
Secretary McAdoo has chosen Mr.
James M. Moyle, '85L, assistant secre-
tary of the treasury, to succeed Byron
Neuton, who has been appointed col-
lector of customs at the port of New
York.
Mr. Moyle is one more of the many
Michigan alumni to fill important gov-
ernment offices.
Since ' graduation, Mr. Moyle has
practiced law in Salt Lake City, Utah.
He was attorney-general of the state
of Utah for one term and has been
active in politics.
He will assume his new duties in
Washington at once.
UNION BUILDING PROGRESSING
DESPITE INEVITABLE DELAYS
Workers on the new Michigan Un-
ion building are now pouring concrete
in the third floor, with but one more
floor left to be poured. The structural
steel work for the roof over the ban-
quet hall will be begun next Monday.
Officials of the Union expect to have
the building completely enclosed and
under roof by the coming Christmas.
The structure is now progressing
rapidly despite certain inevitable de-
lays and the building is to be com-
pleted by September, 1918.
C. Jenks, '16, with Aviation Corps
Word has been received from Carl-
ton Jenks, '16, telling of his safe ar-
rival with the United States aviation
corps in France.
Subscribe for the Michigan Daily.

CHINESE COOLIES DETISE WAY
TO STOP AUTOMOBILE SPEEDING
Place Body of Child in Road Under

Guard to Show
of Court's

Disapproval
Action

Peking, Oct. 16.-Chinese coolies
have devised an effective means of
protesting against speeding automo-
biles.
A few days ago an automobile be-
longing to a prominent Chinese of-
ficial killed a child near the summer
palace. The chauffeur was arrested,
but released upon payment of a very
small fine.
In expression of their disapproval
of the court's action, the parents of
the child and their neighbors erected
a matshed in the middle. of the road,
on the very spot where the child was
killed, under which the coffin was
placed. Inscriptions were frosted on
the sides of the coffin denouncing the
injustice of the court.
Since then the main road has been
abandoned by traffic, but officials ap-
parently have not dared to remove the
body, which is watched constantly by
friends of the bereaved family.
DR, W. E. FORSYTHE ASSUMES
CHARGE OF HEALTH SERVICE
Dr. W. E. Forsythe has arrived in
Ann Arborto take charge of the Uni-
vergity health service.
Doctor Forsythe was a member of
the first health service staff a few
years ago. From Michigan he went to
Pennsylvania State college, and or-
ganized a similar service there. ,Be-
fore returning to Ann Arbor Dr. For-
sythe also was associated with the
International health board in South
America.
The primary consideration of the
health service this year will be pre-
vention of disease. During the course
of the year Dr. Forsythe will write a
series of articles for The Daily, point-
ing out to the students the essential
principles of disease prevention.
NATIONAL GUARD TRAINING
CAMPS TO PUBLISH MAGAZINE
"Trench and Camp," the weekly
publication for the national army and
national guard training camps, will
make its first appearance this week.
This soldiers' newspaper will be pub-
lished at the same time every week
for each camp by the newspaper of
some nearby city.
In the first issue, President Wilson
thanks John Stewart Bryan of Rich-
mond, Va., editor-in-chief of "Trench
and Camp," for the co-operation of
all the newspapers which are getting
out the paper without charge and
turning it over to the Y. M. C. A. for
distribution.
AGRICULTURE AND DOMESTIC
SCIENCE TO BE INSTALLED
New courses for the training of
teachers in agriculture and domestic
science will be installed in the Uni-
versity for the coming semester.
The passage of the Smith-Hughes
bill at the last meeting of congress has
made this addition possible. This bill
provides .$30,000 for the teaching of
agriculture, a like amount for the in-
struction in domestic science and
manual training, and another $30,000
for the training of teachers in these
lines.
Use the Daily classified columns.-

1~_I

Doble-Detroit
Steam. Car

We believe it to be the most revolutionary advance that has been
made in the motor field in ten years.
We have made a most thorough investigation of the Doble- Detroit
Car and of the company back of it.
Many inquiries and applications for stock in the company to manu-
facture Doble Steam Cars have been received from all over the country
and in answer the following information is given: The price is
$12.00 per share, fully paid and non-assessable.
Application blanks for stock or further information may be ob-
tained from
Forshee & Kuehnie
Investment - - Securities
Phone 2169-J . 412 1st Nat. Bank Bldg.
Liberty bonds or certificates accepted.

Try the
Fountain of Youth
for your Candies-bh boxed and plain
We make a specialty of liht lunches. Call and try
them at
The Fountain of Youth
Corner of State and E. Liberty

rI

NEAR CAMPUS RESTAURANTS
NOT IN MEATLESS RANKS
None of the campus border restaur-
ants are as yet observing a meatless
or a wheatless day. Most of them,
however, stated their willingness to
do so if all places would comply. One
proprietor mentioned the fact that stu-
dents had the opportunity to abstain
from meat on Fridays as most restaur-
ants served a substitute at each meal
on that day. He suggested further
that few took the opportunity con-
serving the meat supply on that day,
and he feared that his patrons would
object to a day without meat.
Service Appeals to Former Student
"Service for the United States is at-
tractive," writes R. F. Wuensch, '17,
of the U. S. ambulance corps, who is
now doing service .in France.
His letter was just received by
friends on the campus.

DEAN JORDAN TO REPORT ON
LUCINDA STONE SCHOLARSHIP
Dean Myra B. Jordan will make a
report on the Lucinda Stone scholar-
ship at the State Federation of Wom-
en's clubs which is in session this
week at Traverse City.
In 1904 the Michigan State Federa-
tion set aside $3,000 in commemorac
tion of Lucinda Hillsdale Stone,
founder of the organization, and an
advocate of higher education for wom-
en. The money was given for a loan
fund which would enable women to
have the advantages of the Univer-
sity.
Up to the present time 67 women
have availed themselves ;of this priv-
ilege. The capital of the fund has
been increased to $5,000, and there is
now $1,928 of the interest on the sum,
loaned in student notes.
Patronize Our Advertisers.-Adv.

Zieger, H. M., '17, U. S. navy; sical talent obtainable wil be present
Zewadski, Olie, '17, national army. and furnish music during the eve-
Names received too late for classi- ning.
fication:
Armstrong, F. G., '16, Camp Custer, For refreshments, cider has been
Battle Creek; Burge, J. D., '12, Ft. imported from Florida, in order, oflic-
Benjamii Harrison, Ind.; Burge, K. S., ials say, that the tradition of c. 3r4
'17, Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind.; at engineering smokers may b ob.-
Clark, C. F., '14, ambulance corps, served. The committee was unable to
France; Garrison, H. C., '17, in- buy any locally. Doughnuts and
structor, Great Lakes naval station; "smokes" are also on the menu.
Goodrich, R. M., '17L, sergeant, Michi- Tickets can still be bought at the
gan ambulance corps, Allentown, Pa.; society club rooms, for 35 cents each.
'Johnson, R. W., '18, Ft. Sheridan, Ill.;
Kerr, R. M., '20, chief petty officer, U. PRESIDENT ISSUES CALL FOR
S. navy, Philadelphia; Kieffer, M. H., COUNTRY'S GOLD RESERVES
'20, Michigan amlltlance corps, I
France; Labadie, J. H., '20, supply Washington, Oct. 16. -President
company, Camp Sheridan, Montgom- Wilson tonight sounded a call for the
ery, Ala.; Leffler, S. H., '18, supply mobilization ,of all the nation's gold
company, Camp Sheridan, Montgom- reserves under the supervision of the
ery, Ala.; Mahon, Ross, '12, first lieu- federal reserve board.
tenant, engineers' corps, Camp Louis, In a statement made public through
Tacoma, Wash.; Mahon, William, '13, the board, the president called upon
aviation corps, Camp Louis, Tacoma, all eligible non-member state banks
Wash.; Parks, Sterling, '19-'21L, U. and trust companies to join the fed-
S. S. Wisconsin; Middleditch, G. O., eral reserve system without further
'14E, second lieutenant, aviation, delay that they may "contribute their
Italy; Middleditch, L. B., '19E, second share" to the consolidated gold re-
lieutenant, U. S. artillery, France; serves of the country and aid more
Neumann, J. W., '17E, war work, Phil- effectively "in a vigorous prosecution
adelphia, navy yards; Raynsford, J. and successful termination of the
W., '15E, Ft. Sheridan, Ill.; Raymond, war."

Lav:Cap ,01Le eve . op
I F at
QuarrysadStudents
A SIFIEV E RCTSUN Gy
vP E TSN Sp~~s

WANTED-

FOR SALE

WANTED-

A law student who canI

Here, and here only, can be found the world's greatest I

w

operate typewriter and wishes to
give spare time in exchang for of-
fice experience. Frank E.. Jones, 21
Ann Arbor Savings Bank Building.
WANTED- A tenor Soloist for the
college year. Apply in person at
Room 207 School of Music, or call
phone 269-R, for appointment.
WANTED - Student wants positon
driving car during spare time in aft-
ernoon. Call 371. R. D. Smith.
WANTED-A good well heated room.
Clean with modern furniture. Ad-
dress Box G, Daily.

instruments--
Steinwnay
Vose &
Mend elss4
and many othe
Victor Victrola

FOR SALE - A profitable business
which could be operated by' two
students. An excellent opportunity
to work your way through college.
For further particulars address J. A.
W., care of The Daily.
FOR SALE--Gibson Mandolin. Ab-
solutely new. Will sell at a sac-
rifice. Am subject to immediate
draft. Phone 1951.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Garage or barn. Apply
814 S. University. Phone 368.
LOST
LOST- Black silk umbrella. Ivory
handle with initials.' M. H. S.
Phone 378. Reward.

Pianos, Knabe, Sohmer, Grinnel Bros.,
Sons, Shoninger, Sterling, Huntington,
ohn
ers. The home of Pianola player pianos and
Is.

GRINNELL BROS.

116 S. Main Street

WANTED--Let us
what you want
umn.

supply you with
through this col-

rr r i r + w .

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