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May 12, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rOU'RE NOT READY Buyt
Thrit
FOR SUMMER Stamps
you have ordered that light weight
suit. A summer suit made by Mal-
a combination of style, comfort, and
y. Style is possible for the reason that
is cut and made to your individual
Comfort is there because the mat-
f the surest fabric, and economy, be-
summer suit costs little in the begin-
d if hand tailored by Malcolm will
d always look well-We are showing
ne of serge and flannel trimmings.
BERTY STREET MALCOLM BLOCK

SAYS LIBRARY
TECHNICAL

LACKSI
BOOKS

WHAT'S GOING ON

I

Recent text books in such subjects
as gas engines, automobiles, tele-
graphy, wireless telegraphy, carpentry.
and blacksmithing are needed by the
Library in order that the army me-
chanics in training here may be sup-
plied with the books they need All
books should be left at the general
library or any of its branches.
Although the University library
and the branch in the Engineering
building are at present open to the
mechanics, the number of text books
available is limited, and it is now
planned to give the men a supply for
their own use.-
"The books must be recent to be of
any value," says W. W. Bishop, Uni-
versity librarian. "Magazines have
been furnished by the Y. M. C. A. and
Rotary club of the city; the Library
must furnish the men with books. A
number of books may be sent from
Washington soon, but the mechanics
will want more.
"Engineering students especially
should bring their old text books to
the Library. It may be that some stu-
dents will be leaving to enter mili-
tary service. Those men will have no
need for their books, and would do a
great service by leaving them for the
mechanics."
GREAT BRITAIN SLACKENS
SHIPBUILDING DURING APRIL
Reconstruction Work on Damaged
Ships Congests Shipyards -and
Drydocks

TODAY
6:30 o'clock-Miss Sara Snell, of
New York, speaks at Congregational
church.
6:30 o'clock-Bishop F. C. McCon-
nell speaks to Wesleyan guild of
Methodist church.
6:30 o'clock--Prof. Arthur G. Hall
speaks to Wesleyan Guild of the Meth-
odist church.
6:45 o'clock- Rabbi Marcus Salz-
man, of Wilkes Barre, Pa., addresses
the Jewish Students' congregation.
7:30 o'clock-Bishop F. C. McCon-
nel speaks to Wesleyan Guild of the
Methodist church.
8 o'clock - Menorah concert of
Jewish music at Sarah Caswell Angell
hall.
TOMORROW
8 o'clock-Business meeting of Cer-
cle Francais in the Cercle rooms.
MfCIAlAN BOAT CLUB MAY
NOT 1OLD ANNUAL REGATTA!

TENOR LAUDS WORK
OF CHURCH CHOIRS
"The church choir is the most won-
derful musical organization in Amer-
ica," says Paul Althouse, the Ameri-
can tenor who sings in the "Beati-
tudes" at the Thursday concert of the
May Festival. He has been a singer
since he was six years old, and attri-
butes all of his present success to
his early church singing.
At the age of ten, he was soprano
soloist in the largest church in Read-
ing, Pa. After specializing in chemis-
try at Bucknell college, and working
for a time in the chemical laboratory
of the Reading iron works, he 'went to
New York to cultivate his voice. Six
months after his arrival, totally un-
known and without stage or profes-
sional experience, he was engaged to
sing at the Metropolitan opera house,
the first American tenor without Euro-
pean experience who ever sang lead-
iag roles at that famous institution.

BATTLE SCARRED DOLL
IN CAMPAIGN FOR

St. Catherine, Ont., May 11.-Lieut-
enant Jack O'Brien has brought a
battle scarred doll from shell-torn
France to freedom, although the doll's
seven year old "mamma" lies in a
roughly made grave,'a victims of Ger-
man ruthlessness. The lieutenant
who is on leave from the French for-
eign legion to do recruiting service
in Canada, is using the doll in his cam-
paigin for new soldiers.
"This doll," says the veteran of
many battles, "was handed to me one
day in France by a little brown-eyed,
curly-haired girl while the Germans
were sweeping toward the village in
which the child lived.
"'I want you to to take my doll to
freedom,' she said as her baby arms
tenderly extended this ragged little
sawdust doll to me.
"By terrific fighting the Germans
drove our forces from the village.
Later when we counter-attacked and
regained the town, it was a scene of
desolation, the bodies of soldiers and
civilian filling the streets.
"Among ^the dead was the little doll-
mother who wanted her 'baby' to have
the freedom of which she had been
robbed.
"I buried her in the village from
which the Germans had been unable
to drive her, and promised myself
that I would indeed 'take dolly to free-
(lon.'
GfER.MAN METHODISTS UNFURL
SERVICE FLAG OF FOUR STARS

Seniors

Leave your orders now for
Engraved Cards

heehan & Co.
bor Detroit
®BI SCHOFF ___

Don't Forget

OTHERS' DAY

Sunday, May 12th

low about Flowers?

JORGE J. BISCHOFF

Great Britain failed to keep up her
average in shipbuilding for the month
of April, as compared with the out-
put in March which was about 50,000
tons more. However England is not
falling down in her manufacture of
vessels so necessary for her suc-
cess in the war, because the figures do
not take into consideration the great
number of merchant vessels with
which the shipyards and drydocks
have been congested, due to the rav-
ages of the U-boats and the mines.
Work on the damaged ships must be
completed before construction on the
new ones is started, that the amount of
importation may not be diminished.
In the month of April, 111,533 tons
of shipping were completed in the
yards of the United Kingdom and en-
tered for service, compared with 161,-
674 of the preceding month, according
to a statement issued by the admiral-
ity. The total for the year which end-
ed April 30 was 1,297,337 tons, while
the amount of shipping completed in
allied and neutral countries in the
first quarter of 1918 was 544,327 tons.
BRINGS DOWN SIX GERMAN
PLANES IN ONE DAY'S PATROL

At the present time, it is somewhat
doubtful whether the Michigan Boat
Club will continue to hold its annual
regatta. All the men, who had charge
of the club's affairs last year, have en-
listed in the various branches of the
service. Bud Knowlson who has held
the position of commodore, has just-left
to enlist in the British tank service,
and Lynn Glover, vice-commodore, is
now in the navy. The responsibility
of the organization rests at present on
the shoulders of a very few men, and
the holding of a regatta must be de-
termined by them.
Up to within a few years ago, the
Michigan Union acted as a supervi-
sory board in all financial matters of
the club, which eventually led to
some difficulty over the amount of the
bills charged in the name of the
Union. It seemed to be the custom of
some of the members to go all over
town, charging up various articles.
This cost gradually increased, until
the Union was compelled to put a
stop to the careless way in which the
club conducted its financial matters,
which caused a break between the
two organizations. At the present
they are entirely independent of each
other.y

Prof. aeckel Failing in Health
Amsterdam, May 11.-Professor
Ernest Haeckel, the great German ex-
ponent of the Darwinian theory, is
reported by the German newspapers
to be in failing health. On his 84th
birthday, he sent out to his friends
an engraved birthday card, bidding
them all farewell, and declaring that
he expected to die before next winter.
IIis valedictory expresses the hope
that "soon after the end of his mad,
culture-destroying war, our longed-
for German peace will be firmly estab-
lished on a scientific basis.
Detroit Women to Attend War Council
Miss Georgia Emery, of Detroit,
will represent the business women of
Michigan at a special meeting of the
Y. M. C. A. national war council this
week in New York city.
The great influx of women into com-
mercial and industrial occupations has
created a situation which calls for
immediate analysis and systematiz-
ing. It is the purpose if this conven-
tion to formulate practical plans for
organization which may be applied
among employed women.
70 Engineers to Join Reserve Corps
Morerthan 70 students will be added
to the rolls of the. Engineers' reserve
corps in the first week of June when
these men become eligible to draft.
Most of the details have been at-
tended to and all that remjains is the
return of the enlistment papers from
the war department, so that the engi-
neers will automatically become mem-
bers of the corps as soon as the new
draft law goes into effect.

..Florist..

hapin Street

Phone 809-M

In a special patriotic program at
7:30 o'clock tonight the young people
of the German Methodist church, cor-
ner of Jefferson and West 4th Strees,
will unfurl and dedicate a service flag
in honor of four of their number who
are enlisted in the country's service.
An appropriate program of speeches
and songs by the young people is ar-
ranged and the entire service will be
in English.
The men in whose honor the service
is held are: Rudolph Wuensch, for-
mer superintendent of the German
Methodist Sunday School; Wesley
Bau, only son of the pastor, Rev. H.
Bau, now completing a six months
period of training in the ordnance
department at Camp Hancock, Geor-
gia; Louis Berger, enlisted in the
marines; and Henry Kuebler, enlisted
in the Canadian contingent.
A cordial invitation is extended to
all to attend these services.
MR. BROWN
Offers men and women high-
est marketable prices for their
old clothes. Anything in the
of suits, overcoats, or shoes he will
take off your hands. Sell your old
clothes. They are no good to you.
I can use them. You will get your
money's worth. No quibbling to buy
them cheap. Their absolute value will
paid. Men's and women's apparel
both. Call Mr. ClaudeBrown at 210
Hoover Ave. Phone 2601. He will
gladly call at your residence.-Adv.

IFLORIST

Senior'
ame Cards

Either Printed
or Engraved

&OHLINGER
PT PRINTERS

109-Ill E. Washington
Phone 432 -J
JILbERS UNION OFFERS
SETTLE LABOR PROBLEMS
on, May 11.-The Boilermakers
pbuilders union, in a letter to
tish government, has offered to
onnage committees" in every
Lding district to deal with the
de of the shipbuilding problem.
zty of these committees, the
ays, will be "to see that the
output of ships is brought up
,000 tons."
der that the committee shall
e entire confidence of employ-
employees in each district,'
11 be elected locally by both
rs and employes. Petty dis-
nd delays will be settled lo-
they occur.

Y. A. C. A. Notes'
The War Preparedness Committee
will send men throughout the county
this week to sell thrift stamps. Stu-
dents playing musical instruments will
accompany the speakers giving pro-
grams' similar to the one given here
last night.
The new cabinet of the Y. M. C. A.
are making plans for the inaugura-
tion of officers on June 2. Prominent
campus speakers will be present and
special music will also be a feature.
The cabinet have also arranged for a
combined outing and conference on
Decoration day. Plans for the next
year's work will be discussed.
Students desiring odd jobs, or sum-
mer work will be able to find employ-
ment at th'e Y. M. C. A. employment
bureau as the demand for student
labor is unusually great.
Two Michigan men were among the
group of men who sailed recently for
France to enter the Y. M. C. A. over-
seas work. Rev. John D. Finlayson,
'11, is now an educational secretary.
Mr. Albert F. Stewart, '91, is also en-
gaged in educational work abroad.

Mother's Day Services to be Held
Special exercises will mark the
Mothers' Day services at 10:30 o'clock
this morning at the First Congrega-
tional church. Rev. Lloyd C. Doug-
las will preach the sermon on the sub-
ject, "Patriotic Motherhood." Mr.
James Hamilton, tenor will sing Bur-
leigh's "Little Mother O'Mine." Miss
Lucy Cannon will play a violin offer-
tory, and Mr. Robert Dieterle will
sing Kipling's "Mother O'Mine."
Miss Sarah Snell, traveling secre-
tary of the Student Volunteer move-
ment, will speak this evening on the
subject, "Students Abroad," and Miss
Ruth Cann will sing.

Paris, May 11.-Six German air-
planes- have been brought down in
one day by Sub-Lieut. Rene Fonck,
the war office announces.
The text of the statement follows:
"Yesterday Lieut. Fonck brought
down six German planes in the course
of two patrols. He downed the first
in two seconds, the third in five min-
utes later, and the other three in the
course of the second patrol.
Lieut. Fonck's achievement has
never been equalled. He is now the
leading French ace. He was credited
unofficially a month ago with hav-
ing shot down 34 German machines.
"Lieut Fonck was a friend of the
late Captain Guynemer. The latter's
slayer, the German Wissemann, was
shot down by Fonck Sept. 30, 1917.
Fonck is but 23 years of age.
Bishop McConnel to Speak Tonight
"Observations on the Western
Front" will be the subject of the lec-
ture by Bishop F. J. McConnel, of
Denver, Colorado, to be given at 7:30
o'clock tonight in the Methodist
church. Bishop McConnel lectured
last week at Harvard, and has a na-
tion-wide reputation as a speaker.
As he has just returned from a three
months stay in France he is well-
versed in recent war happenings.

~

Battle Creek School Founds Sorority
Alpha Theta Pi, an honorary scien-
tific sorority, has been founded at the
Battle Creek school of home economics
and dietetics. The aim of this orga-
nization is to promote the advance-
ment of scientific and educational
ideas. Among it members are persons
eminent in these fields and authors
who have made valuabledcontribu-
tions to these subjects.

The Famous Beshmer Menu

Have You Tried It?

Have you ever sunk a tooth into one of his thick, juicy,. well-seasoned

harcoal-Grilled Porterhouse Steaks

$1 & $1.15

A Well-Balanced
Porterhouse Steak Dinner

$1& 1.5

Connor's Brick Ice Cream. Phone
1410-Adv.
Gasoline 25c, Polarine 50c. Staebler
& Co., 117 So. Ashley St.-Adv.
Play Ground, Indoor' and Tennis
Balls at Cushing's.-Adv.

"FREDDIE BESIMER'S"

113 W. Huron St.

Over Rae Theater

Opp. D. U. R. Station

's Three Color Brick
Calkins' Drug Co.-Adv.

Ice

1 ____________________

l

I

MAY

FESTIVAL

WAR SAVINGS STA.MPS-
IssuED BY THE.~
UNITED STATES
C:OVERWN"C

MAY 15, 16, 17, 18

WAR SAYINGS STAMPS
ISSUED BY THE
UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT

TICKETS ON SALE AT SCHOOL OF MUSIC

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