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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 12, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FNCS OF HILY VALms
FENCE HIGHLY HiUED

-t Coats

ed Models in Flannel
ad Knitted Fabrics
$8.50 to $12.50

GAVEL )IADE FROM POST TO
IN'SCIBE"I"N ITS MEM-
ORY

BE

.1

-4

radhams &Co.

EET

MAIN STREET

YOU CAN PHONE US TO CALL
for your flannel coat, house coat,
lounging robe, gloves, evening clothes
or anything else in your wardrobe, ex-
cept shoes, and we will send for them
and after dry cleaning them by our
special process, return them to you
spick, span, immaculate and faultless.
Wise men employ us regularly to keep
their wardrobe lookin newall the
t ime. They save a lot of money by
their wisdom.
ANN ARBOR STEAM
DYE WORKS

1 1 ----.------------------.....-

SHIRTS
AND
CLOTHES

FOR'
EVERYTHING
ELECTRICAL
No Jolt too Smnall or too, Large
y ?
WASHTENAW
ELECTRIC SHOP
"The Shop of Quality"
If it's not right we make it right
- PHONE 273 -

attention
by hand

Laundry

I

235!

200 E. Washington
Ann Arbor

117 Purl
Ypsilanti

w

t1
Try our Chop Suey
Chinese and American Dishes

CONOMY

Among the many things that are
regarded as Michigan tradition, per-
haps the most important are incidents
connected with the old campus fence.
Relics made from the old wooden
fence, now in the possession of many
of the older graduates of the Univer-
sity, are considered of inestimable
value. They are final remembrances
of former events and scenes, and are
looked upon as a means of cherishing
old Micigan ideals.
Among the number of relics from
the old fence, there is one that has
been of especial -interest in campus
circles. It is a gavel that was pre-
sented President Angell as a remem-
brance of the fence, at the time it was
torn down. Ever since that time, the
gavel has been in the possession of
the president of the Board of Regents,
and has been used at all their meet-
ings. It is said that it was made from
the cedar of one of the posts that sup-
ported the fence.
Last week the gavel was taken to
one of the jewelers of the city to have
a band placed around it with the in-
scription "This was presented to Pres-
ident Angell in 1888 from the old
campus fence." It is expected that
the gavel will continue to be used by
the presiding officer at all the Re-
gents' meetings.
There were two fences that sur-
rounded the campus in the early days
of theUniversity. The first was a rail
fence constructed roughly of logs.
The purpose of it, according to one of
the oldest residents of the city, was
not for its value as a ornament, but
as a means of protection from cows
and sheep that grazed about the city.
It is said that it was not unusual for
them to be driven from private lots
surrounding city homes, and even at
the present time, there are fences in
the city that were built primarily for
the same reason. Some are known to
be more than 40 years of age.
The second fence around the campus
was considerably more ornamental.
It was a picket fence with numerous
cedar posts. Instead of gates there
were large openings all along the mile
fence, and it is thought to have been
six feet high, in order to insure more
adequate protection. When the fence
was torn down, the timber was sold to
one of the business men of the city
for a comparatively small amount. The
cedar posts were largely taken by in-
dividuals, however, and transformed
into various relics that are still known
to be in the possession of old grad-
uates. One woman in the city has a
picture frame.made of this cedar, and
also a bowl which was made in the
engineering department of the Univer-
sity.
Many stories are told of the old
wooden fence. One is that the .stu-
dents, in their class fights, strove to
put each other over the fence, and
many interesting struggles are known
to have taken place. The fence is
reported to have been the scene of
many a hard fought battle between the
sophomores and freshmen.
Another interesting fact that is told
by an old Michigan graduate, is that
the fence at one time was a source of
protection from the law. Inside of
the fence, students were free from
the hands of the Ann Arbor author-
ities. Students were able to com-
mit any affense, and once within the
bounds of the old wooden fence, could
not be taken by the authorities. Num-
erous instances have been referred to
of students jumping over the fence
and grinning at the police. In spite
of the defiance, the police were power-..
less to act.
The fence is supposed to have been
torn down in 1886.

City Din Strengthens Ear Nerves
London, May 11.-Army Medical
men have made the discovery that
city boys have better ears than those
from country districts. Only one re-
cruit in five from quiet neighborhoods
has the keen hearing possessed by the
average city dweller. It is assumed
that the quiet of the country tends
to weaken, through disuse, the nerves
of the ear, while the din of the town
keeps the nerves responsive.

SUNDAY SERVICES IN
ANN ARBOR CHURCHES
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church
Holy Communion at 7:30 o'clock;
Church school at 9:15 o'clock at Har-
ris hall. Morning prayer at 10:30
o'clock with sermon by the Rev. Henry
Tatlock.
St. Thomas' Roman Catholic Church
Masses at 6, 7:30, 8:30, and 10:30
o'clock.
First Congregational Church
Mother's Day sermon, "Patriotic
Motherhood," at 10:30 o'clock by the
Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas. Special musi-,
cal program. Young People's meet-
ing at 6:30 o'clock will be addressed
by MViiss Sara Snell of New York on
the subject, "Students Abroad."
German Methodist Episcopal Church
Special Mother's Day service at 10
o'clock. Epworth league will observe
Anniversary Day Festival at 7:30 o'-
clock. Special music and dedication
of service flag. All services in Eng-
lish.
First Methodist Episcopal Church
Sermon at 10:30 o'clock by the Rev.
A. W. Stalker on the subject, "The
Art of Receiving" Bible school at
noon, and evening service at 7:30
o'clock with address by Bishop F. J.
McConnell of Denver,. Col. Subject,
"Observations on the Western Front."
Broadway Methodist Episcopal Church
Class meeting at 9:30 o'clock. Com-
bined Christian Endeavor and church
services at 10:30 o'clock with dedi-
cation of service flag.
Bethel A. M. E. Church
Mother's Day service at 10:30 0'-
clock with sermon by the Rev. J. A.
Charleston on "The Faithfulness of
Mother." Dr. C. E. Allen will preach
at 2:30 o'clock and there will be
Mother's Day exercises at 7:30 o'clock.
First Baptist Church
Sermon by the Rev. 3. M. Wells at
10:30 o'clock on the subject, "Service
Through Character." Bible school
at noon, and Wesleyan gifild meeting,
Subject, "Relation of Students to Their
Home Churches." Young People's
meeting at 6:30 o'clock.
Community Chapel
Bible school at 4 o'clock. Subject,
"The Significance of Suffering." Ves-
per service at 5 o'clock with sermon
on "Remember Your Mother."
. Second Baptist Church
"Debt to Mothers," subject of special
sermon to mothers by the Rev. J. B.
Pharr at 10:30 o'clock. Evening- ser-
mon at 7:30 o'clock on the subject,
"The Pearl of Great Value." B. Y
P. U. meets at 6:30 o'clock.
Presbyterian Church
Mother's Day sermon by the Rev.
L. A. Barrett at 10:30 o'clock on the
subject, "Mothers of America." Miss
Sara Snell will speak at the Young
People's Bible class following the
morning service. Young People's
evening service at 6:30 o'clock preced-
ed by a social half-hour beginning at
6 o'clock.
St. Paul's Lutheran Church
First of a series of sermons on
"Elijah" at 10:30 o'clock by the Rev.
H. A. Brauer. Evening sermon at 7:30
o'clock on the subject, "Deliver Us

From Evil."
Zion Lutheran Church
Morning service at 10:30 o'clock and
evening service with sermon on the
subject, "One of God's Fearless Noble-
men," at 7:30 o'clock. The Rev. E.
C. Stellhorn, pastor.
Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church
Morning service with sermon at
10:30 o'clock by the Rev. L. M. Wal-
lick on "Mothers of Men." Special
music. Evening sermon at 7.30 a'-
clock on "The Gospel of the Son of
God."
Connor's Brick Ice Cream. Phone
1410-Adv.
U. of M. Jewelry. J. L. Chapmaaa
is the place. 211 B. ain.-A-dY.

Calkins
Drug
Co.

i

Fountain of Youth
Corner State and Liberty

QUARTS

YOUR SPRING SUIT
will be carefully tailored of the new de-
pendable fabrics.
New Models distinctly our own.

"eSnappy Niew"~

ii

GOLF SUITS

RIDING BREEC

Neckties and, Shirt

Delibered at your doorl ihen you

Mother's Day To(
Remember Her With
Connor's Brick Ice Cr
Assorted Flavors

Phone 1410 or 416

D. E. Grennan
The Custom Tailor 606 E, L

Men's Furnishings
Varsity Toggery Shop
1107 S. University Ave.

Order

PIT

Eat a Plate of our Ice Cream
Ice Cream is food if it's made from pure and fresh cream
Ours is. We know it because we make it.

be accompanied by
gment, and depends
SERVICE not Price
CURTIS
TIRES

good
on

WAI KING LOG
Joe Gin, Prop.

314 s.State St.

Phone 1244-MI

NOTICE

give 6,000 miles of service
"URTIS TIRE &
RUBBER Co.
Muskegon, Mlich.
l i l a r y s EA [ ![ x s F o u n ta i n P e n s ,
aches f~EAr EBE t Waterman
$21 sIE and ConKlin
U. of M. Jewelry}
flanderer & Sey fried
ga cleaned and washed. Satisfao-
guaranteed. Koch and Henn.-

Sell Walnut Canes at Bazaar
West Chester, Pa., May 11.-Canes
of walnut from a tree which stood in
front of the Birmingham meeting
house before the battle of Brandywine,
have been made by a local concern.
They will be sold at a bazaar for the
benefit of war hospitals.
Other canes will 'e sent to French
war officials as mementoes of, General
Lafayette, who was wounded almost
within the shadow of the tree.
One cane made of a selected piece
of the tree has been sent to M. Jus-
serand, the French ambassador at
Washington.
Physicians Return from Custer Visit
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, of the Uni-
versity health service, Dr. Joseph A.
Elliott, instructor of dermatology in
the Medical school, and Dr. Howard H.
Cummings, have returned from Camp
Custer where they have been inspect-
ing the medical equipment of the
camp.
Class Dancing Monday and Thurs-
day evenings at the Packard.-Adv.

Persons wishing to take women roomers during the
mer Session, consult office of Dean of Women.

Bethlehem Evangelical Church
English sermon at 9:45 o'clock and
German sermon at 10:30 o'clock, both
by the Rev. G. A. Neumann. Young
People's league meets at 6:30 o'clock.
Church of Christ-Disciples
Communion service at 11 o'clock
Christian Endeavor at 6:30 o'clock.
University Men's morning Bible class
at 9:30 o'clock.

Im-

Realize for yourself
pleasure of Home Coo
Food. Prices Reasona
Service Paramount.

TRUBEX
218 S. Main Street

or's Brick Ice Cream.
dv.

PhoneI

Daily Classified columns.

-. . ,

Copy
s and

AflVERTfI.INf

Leave Copy
at
Student'
Supply Store

FOR SALE
LE-Two Choice May Festival
ts for Friday and Saturday
loons, also for Saturday eve-
Main floor. Phone, Herbst,
W, or 536-J.
kLE--Two Festival tickets for
esday, Thursday, Friday. Main
Section 3, row S, Section 4,
). Call 1018-M..

FOR1 RENT

FOR RENT-For summer months, sev-
eral cool, well furnished rooms with
porches, in private family. Vicinity
St. Joseph's Sanitarium. Phone
2161-R or "M" Daily Office.
FOR RENT-Five room furnished fiat
with sun parlor, near Campus, for
three summer months. Call 2513-W.
WANTED

First Church of Christ (Scientist)
Morning service at 10:30 o'clock
with sermon on the subject, "Adam
and Fallen Man." Testimonial meet-
ing at 7:30 o'clock Wednesday even-
ing.
Seventh Day Adventist Church
Sermon at 7:30 o'clock on the sub-
ject, "Christ the Only Mediator Be-
tween God and Man," preceeded by
song service beginning at 7:15 o'clock.
Bible Chair House
The University Men's Bible class
will meet at 9:30 o'clock in the par-.
lors of the Church of Christ. Sub-
ject for discussion, "JesusW Teach-
ings Concerning the Truth." After-
noon class at 4 o'clock with discus-
sion on "The Bible and Nature--With
Special Reference to Trees."
M. BROWN
Offers men and women high-
est marketable prices for their
old clothes. Anything in the
way of suits, overcoats, or shoes .he
will take off your hands. Sell your old
clothes. They are no good to you.
I can use them. You will get your
money's worth. No quibbling to buy
cheap. Their absolute value will be
paid. Men's and women's apparel
both. Call Mr. Claude Brown at 210
Hoover Ave. Phone 2601. He will
gladly call at your residence.-Adv.
Our Merchant Advertisers represent
the progressive business men of Ann
Arbor.-Adv.

WELL-DRESSED

Your Spring,

Good Lunches of Rice and
l c all the time
Chinese and American CROP
Short Orders
Michigan Inn 601 E. Li

if-made
by

will give you that

A, F. MARJUARDT
OFFICERS'
UNIFORMS
516 E. William St. Ph(

-Set

of Harvard Classics. WANTED-One or two good Festival
sell for cash for $40. seats. Miss Lydecker. Phone 641-J.

May Festival ticket
of concerts. Phone
May Festival Tick-
center. Phone 144.

WANTED-To help you fulfill your
needs through our Classified column.
XISCBLLANEOUS
NOTICE-Mineral and Turkish baths,
expert attendance. Rheumatism,
blood and nerve diseases cured.
Phone 800-M. 28 North Huron St.,

Springtime is Victrola Time
A complete line of Victrolas to select from
Prices $20.00 to $400.00
TERMS TO SUIT YOU'
GRINNELL BROS., 116 s. Main St.

I. C. Eisele, '173t, Ordered to
Dr. David C. Eisele, '17M, wh
been in private practice at Gy
Mich., was ordered to report to
Oglethrope, Ala.
Connor's Brick Ice Cream. I
416.-Adv.
Base Ball Supplies-all kind
Cushing's.-Adv.

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