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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 10, 1918 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IvJCHIGAN D

AILY

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Is rrom
xchanges

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* AT THE THEATERS *I

YEARLY. DAMAGE BY RATS
CLOSE TO 5200,000.00G

On Memorial day, May 30, the larg-
est service flag in the country will be
presented to the University of Wis-
consin by its students in honor of the
Badger men now in service. The flag,
* which will contain aver 1,500 stars,
each bearing the name of the Wiscon-
sin man in service and his class num-
eral, is entirely the work of the stu-
dent body. The men are stencilling
the names on the stars and the women
are embroidering them on the flag.
There will be five gold stars among
the 1,500.
At a meeting held May 6, the athletic
committee of Harvard decided in fav-
or of continuing sports in the fall and
through 1918-19. It seems certain,
however, that there will be a ruling
that no men not in the R. 0. T. C.
shall take part in athletics next year.
An oversubscription of 30 per cent
was recorded by the University of
Wisconsin in the third Liberty Loan.
One thousand, two hundred and sev-
enteen persons bought bonds for a
total of $195,750.
Dean Olin Tenplin, of the Uni-
versity of Kansas, has returned from
Washington, where he held a position
as aide to Herbert. Hoover, and is ex-
pected to resume his scholastic duties.
Mrs. Beatrice Forbes Robertson
Hale, author, lecture, actress, and
niece of Sir Johnson Forbes Robert-
son, will speak at a food conservation
rally to be held at Cornell university,
May 15.
Cap and gown day will be celebrated
as usual at the University of Minne-
sota, with the exception of several pa-
triotie innovations in the program for
the gccason. Announcements of elec-
tions to Phi Beta Kappa,. Lambda Al-
pha Psi, Tau Beta Pi, and Alpha Om-
ega Alpha., will be made as part of
the ceremonies.
95 PER CENT OF POPULATION
AFFECTED BY TUBE RULOSIS
"According to the best medical au-
thorities, 95 per cent of the entire
population of this country are affected
at some time or other in their lives
with tuberculosis," sa'd Mr. W. L.
Cosper, secretary of the Michigan
anti-tuberculosis assQciation, yester-
day.
"Many peopkr of course never know
that they have it, because, unless they
are in a susceptible condition, the
disease does not develop and finally
disappears," he continued., "This has
been proven by post-morten examina-
tions which show the scars on the
persons lungs, and by the examination,
of living people."
He explained; that people are liable to
contract the disease if they are affec-
ted by such illness as influnza, and
happen to drink or eat from a unten-
sil that a tubercular person has used.

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*E
"Doing Our Bit," at the Garrick. *IENGLIISH GOVERNMENT

*i

ISSUES

TODAY

s Majestic-"Over The Top, .,play-
ed by Sergt. Arthur Guy Empey
and an all star cast.

*
*:
'pI

Wuerth-Enid Bennett in "Keys
of the Righteous." Also Keystone
comedy, "A Lady Killer's Doom."'
Orpheum-Mary Warren and'
Joe King in "The Vortex." Also
comedy, "Her Bohemian Party."

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Arcade-"The House of Glass," *
played by Clara Kimball Young. *
Also Christie comedy, "Nearly a *
Papa." *
* * * * * * * * * * * *

AT TUE WHITNEY

"Oh Boy," the most charming of the
newer musical comedies, is coming to
the Whitney for two performances to-
morrow. Guy Bolton and P. G. Wode-
house wrote the rather light book and
the very clever lyrics of the piece and
Jerome Kern is the author of the mus-
ic- The fame of the play hangs upon.
its songs, "Till the Clouds Roll By,"
"An Old Fashioned Wifej" "A Pal
Like You," and "Nesting Time in Flat-
bush," are quite as good as anything
that has appeared in recent years.

AT THE MAJESTIC

some-
better

have

Ld of
thes.

you

"Over the Top," the greatest war
picture of them all, opened its Ann Ar-
bor engagement before a large and'
tremendously enthusiastic audience
last night. To those who had read'
Empey's book the interpretation was
eminently satisfactory, and to others
a new phase of the war was present-
ed. The big scenes, such as the sink-
ing of the Lusitania, the ventures
over the top, and through no man's
land, and the distruction of the muni-
tion plant, were full of real thrills,
and the actual war scenes were handl-
ed with a realism that was almost un-
canny.
The scenes which depicted the
spread of German propaganda through
the distribution of ground glass in
red cross surgical dressings, and the
poison in soup for the soldiers, were
perhaps over emphasized, but if they
were planned to stir up anti-German
* feeling they served their purpose. The
pictures of President Wilson and the
quotations from his war speech were
well presented and enthusiastically
received by the audience. Altogeth-
er, "Over the Top" is a great pic-
ture. It will be shown at the Majestic
today and tomorrow, matinee and
night.
Prof. Young Lectures at Camp Custer
. Prof. L. J. Young, of the forestry de-
partment, will lecture tonight and to-
morrow afternoon at two different "Y"
huts at Camp Custer. The subject
of his address will be "A Forester's
Life."
Profesor Young lectured at School-
craft Wednesday night on "Forestry
and the Nation."

vCAUTIONARY NOTICE
TO FARMERS
LondonMay 9.-The yearly damage
to food by rats, in England alone, is
estimated at $200,000,000, according
to a cautiontary notice just issued to
farmers by a government committee.
The latter urges a ruthless offensive
against the rat. It says in 'part:
"In your buildings, graneries, and
barns, you have an underground en-
emy who destroys our food supplies
almost as much as the submarine.
The nation cannot afford to keep rats
at a moment when ever sack of
wheat is urgently needed.
Rats Breed Fast
"In the rush of work on the form,
rats have been neglected and have
multiplied. They breed faster than
any other vermin. The rat, will breed
four months old, and have from three
to five litters in a year. The aver-
age litter is ten, but as many as 23
have been found. At that rate of in-
crease, you cannot go on feeding them.
But unless you are prepared to feed
them, it is an unneighborly act to
keep them at all, for the moment you
stint ,them of food, they will swarm
over your neighbor's farm.
"At a moderate estimate, the Eng-
lish countryside is feeding one rat
per head of the total "population of
these islands, and ten rats will eat,
apart from what they spoil as much
grain as you and your wife consume.
Save the English harvest of 1918' for
yourself and don't waste it on rats.
How to Protect Grain
"What are you to do? Keep your
grain protected and make the fullest
use of traps, snares, ferrets, and dogs.
Barn owls are among your best
friends. Close rats holes with con-
crete and glass. Organize hat hunts,
and encourage ratcatching on your
farms by giving some small reward.
Hunt your hedge-rows with dogs and
ferrets. Get your neighbors to do the
same.
"We cannot afford to feed the rats.
We cannot raise too much grain, in
fact we can hardly hope to have
enough to feed ourselves."
FINE CIVILIANS FOR WEARING
GOVERNMENT ISSUED APPAREL
War Department Orders Close Watch
On Those Misrepresenting Mn -
in Service
No civilian is permitted to buy or
wear government issued leggings,
breeches, hats, caps, hat cords, blous-
es, socks, shoes, or underwear, accord-
ing to an act of congress, which was
enacted at the last session. The pen-
alty. for non-observance of this act is
a fine of $300, or imprisonment for
six months, or both.
Members of the local army recruit-
ing ,office have received orders from
the war department to keep close'
watch for men wearing any article of
government issue, or an article made
up to represent government issue, so
as to deceive enlisted men into milit-
ary courtesies, and cause their immed-
iate arrest.
Boys attending school in Ann Ar-
bor have been wearing many articles
of government clothing in direct vio-
lation of the act, such as collar orna-
ments, cap ornaments, caps, and leg-
gings. According to the act, they are
subject to arrest.
Girls have been seen wearing cam-
paign hats with infantry or other hat
cords. They also come under the pro-
visions of the act.
OFFICERS' TRAINING SCHOOL
MAY CLOSE ON WAY OVERSEAS

Camp Custer, May 9.-It is probable
that the next offices' training school,
which opens at Camp Custer, May 15,
will close either in France or on the
way overseas.
An order recently issued states that
the training school is to be on in-
tegral part of the division and will
move with the division. The three
months' course, with the possibility
of an added two weeks, as in the case
of the third school, would bring the
date of closing well in August. In as
much as the division is expected to
move before August the school will
necessarily move with it.
'TYPEWRITERS FOR RENT-Wood
ward &, Washington. 8-9 A. A. fty-
ings Bank Bldg. Phone 868.-Adv.
Free Exhibition of the celebrated
Medici Color Prints now on display at
the James Foster House of Art.-Adv

MILITARY NEWS
Cadets expecting to be drafted or
who intend to enlist in the army or
navy before next fall are asked by the
military authorities to leave their
name, company, and regiment with
First Sergeant Miesel in the record
office in the Natural Science building.
The record in the R. O. T. C. should
be looked up and noted on the slip.
Leroy C. Johnson, '16, a graduate
of the third officers' training camp at
Camp Custer, is now awaiting a com-
mission of second lieutenancy in the
field artillery.
Cadets of the pecond battalion, Sec-
ond regiment, will be given the fol-
lowing program at 4:15 o'clock this,
afternoon by Dr. George A. May:
Company E, grenade throwing;
company F, broad jump; company G,
fence vaulting; and company H, soft
ball.
Prospective candidates for the Var-
sity grenade team, and for a second
team, will meet at 11 o'clock tomorrow
morning on Ferry field. The rules
for grenade throwing will be those
adopted by the colleges in the Confer-
ence. Three regulation targets have
been marked out by Dr. May, and the
men on the first and second teams
will be given additional training.
Dr. A. S. Warthin will give a lec-
ture to the cadets at 8 o'clock tonight
in Hill auditorium on "Fit to Fight."
Special reels of motion pictures will
also be shown. The lecture is open to
the cadets, enlisted medics and me-
chanics, members of the faculty, phy-
sicians, teachers, and clergymen, but
it is not open to the general public.
STUDENTS TO SELL STAMPS
IN EIGHT NEIGHBORING TOWNS
Eight groups, each composed of six
students, will leave the Michigan
Union at 6:15 o'clock tomorrow night
in automobiles for Dexter, .Milan, Sa-
line, Chelsea, Manchester, Bridge-
water, Whitemore, and Salem. The
purpose of the trips is to sell War
saving stamps. Several members of
each group will render different songs
while in the towns. The automobiles
have been donated by merchants.
KEYSTONE STATE STUDENTS
TO GIVE INFORMAL DANCE
Faculty members and students from
Pennsylvania will meet at an inform-
al dance Friday May 24, at the Union.
The Keystone state contingent num-
hers about 300, and it is expected that
a large percentage of this number will
turn out for this annual affair.
Ike Fisher will furnish the music.
The names of ticket sellers will be
announced in a few days.
MR. BROWN
Offers men and women high-
est marketable prices for their
old clothes. Anything in the
of suits, overcoats, or shoes he will
take off- your hands. Sell your old
clothes. They are no good to you.
I can use them. You will get your
money's worth. No quibbling to buy
them cheap. Their absolute value will
paid. Men's and women's apparel
both. Call Mr. Claude Brown at 210
Hoover -Ave. Phone 2601. He will
gladly call at your residence.-Adv.
Our Merchant Advertisers represent
the progressive business men of Ann
Arbor.-Adv.

WHlI1N Ely
Saturday, May 11
Mat., 2:30; Night, 8:20
THE COMSTOCK-ELUOTTC3,
Presents
THE SMARTEST AND RWIGHTEST
OF ALL MUSICAL COMED!ES
x by ur BOLTON 3d
PG Wooouse
f Musk/ by
A . , JEaO...< E:N

ARCADE1
SHOWS AT 3:00, 6:30, 5:oo, 9:3o
15c Unless Otherwise Specified.
Thur-Fri--io-Clara Kimball Young in
"The House of Glass" and Christie
Comedy, "Nearly a Papa." loc.
Sat-r i-Anna Nilsson and Charles Rich.
man in "Over 'there ;" and 2nd of
James Montgomery Flagg's "Girls
You Know." Series, "The Screen
Fan." 20c.
Mon-r3-Harold Lockwood 'in "The
Landloper," and Drew Comedy,
"When a Man Marries."

225 E. Liberty.

Phone 1321

I

GOODHEW FRA co.I

lITE PINE BI
DISCOVERED

Flowers
Plants
Ferns

Baskets
Corsages
Decorations

I

I

I VER

White pine blister rust was discov-
ered recently on a farm near Birm-
ingham by Mr. T. A. Thomson, an as-
sistant to Prof. L. J. Young, who has
been appointed by the bureau of plant
industry, of the U. S. department of
agriculture, to inspect all wooded land
in Michigan for evidences of this
disease.
Professor Young stated it to be a
very harmful disease brought in from
Europe which has already distroyed
a number of pine forests in the east.
This is the second'evidence of it found
in Michigan. Trees infected with the
disease were discovered last summer
near Pontiac.
Professor Young explained that a
diseased pine tree does not directly
infect another, but the spar which
carries the rust blows from the tree to
a current of gooseberry bush, devel-
ops there and is blown to anothe pine
tree.
Use the Daily classified columns.
Matinees ARNights
50C to 50c SRc to
$2.00 DETROIT KU $2.50
Lee and J. J. Shubert present the
Winter Garden Show
"DOING OUR BIT"

p and
ian this

THE
TOP"

,.

I when

epair trunks. Koch and Henne.
50.-Adv.
ing Friday and Saturday nights
Armory.--Adv.

I

- with -
SERGT. ARTHUR GUY
EMPEY
(Himself)
Supported by Lois Meredith,
James Morrison and
an All-Star Cast
M AJES TIC
T H AT
TODAY
and
SATURDAY
Vitagraph's
Marvelous Photoplay
of EMPEY'S
World-famous Book
Shows-3:00, 7:30, 9:00-Shows
s;;111l4l l t 1 1 1illl ll H 1 1
WuerthTheater
Afternoon-2:3o and 4:oo
Evening-7:oo S:oo and bo:oo
= Phone-i 6o-j
BOOKINGS FOR MAY
' Thur-Fri-9-co-Enid Bennett in "Keys
of the Righteous." Also Ke stone
"A Lady Killer's Doom."
Sat-u-Olive 'ell in "The Girl and
- the Judge." Also News and Comedy.
Sun-Mon-'-12-13--W. S. Hart in "The
Two Gun Men in the Bargain." Also
E Son of Democracy, "Down the
Tues-Wed- 14-15-Pauline Frederick in
"Madame Jealousy." Also "Eagle
Eye," No. i0.
Thurs-Fri - 16-17 - Roy. Stewart in
= . "Boss of the Lazy Y." Also Com-
edy.

I

ite

Tallored

and

Dress Hats

J'

i

OrpheumTheati
Afternoon-2:30 and 4:oo
Evening-7:oo S:oo and xo:oo
Phone-i6o-J .
BOOKINGS FOR MAY
Thurs-Fri-9-ro-Mary Warren
Joe King in "The Vortex." A
Comedy, "Her Bohemian Party.
Sat-ii-Baby rMariesOsborne
"Daddy's Girl." Also Newsa
Comedy, "The Tip."
Sun-Mon-r2-r3-Alma Rubens in "
Love Brokers." Also Comedy
News.

NCKL EY

PR]
Matinee-

Our Merchant Advertisers
the progressive business me

esent

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