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May 10, 1918 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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I

Than io Seconds Of Playi

George Sisler, the star first sacker
the St. Louis Browns, seems to
axe a habit of establishing new re-
rds. In Tuesday's game at Detroit,
took him less than 10 seconds to
ake two assists.
Two Tigers were out in the ninth,
[th Pop Young at bat. Young drove
liner down at Sisler, who did not
ve time to beat the runner to first

base, so he tossed the ball to Gallia
who ran to cover the bag. Gallia
dropped the throw and it rolled away.
Sisler grabbed the ball throwing it
to Gedeon at second, several feet=
ahead of Young who was attempting
to advance. Cedeon, also muffed the
ball, the runner reached second safe-
ly. In this way Sisler got two assists,
while Gedeon and Gallia each had an
error credited'against them.

men TENNIS MEN HOPE FOR
meet SECOND WIN FOM OHIO
rerine _
WEATHER DURING PAST WEEK
e the HAS GIVEN OPPORTUNITY FOR
ad he MUCH PRACTICE
place
. A Michigan's tennis team will travel
I the along with the baseball team to Co-
would lumbus today and meet the Ohio State
arsity team, in a return tournament, at the
>e be- Buckeye university tomorrow after-
noon.
arsity Two weeks ago Egbert and Hamer
ue to took the Ohioans into camp winning
Buck- two of the three matches played. The
erday powerful driving of Egbert was large-
Gil- ly responsible for the victory, he hav-
efore ing little trouble with his opponant
e job Wirthwein. In the doubles, the Wol-
field- verines had the Ohio team completely
been outclassed.
ellent Ohio Must Improve
es in The home court may give to the
Columbus unversity, a little advantage,
was but a big improvement will have to
>ver- be shown on the part of Davis and
most Wirthwein if they win the coming
a the matches. Davis, the lengthy leader
1 who of the Ohio duet, is very likely to
orked take his single, as he did here. The
nach- game played by Hamer was just what"
e at he liked. If Egbert is against him
heid- at Columbus, the Californian's mash-
ing game may break through the big
fellow's defense.
who With Hamer and Wirthwein as op-
since ponents, their match should be a close
ation one. Both play, somewhat the same
) the kind of game, and the winner will be
s not the one which proves to have the
king more indurance.
was Have Had Much Practice
rman The .agreeable weather has allowed
man. the team to get-in much practice this
r the week and they are in better condition
t and than at any time this year. The two
re- preceeding tournaments were played
serve without any previous workouts.
game Next week, Hamer and Egbert play
was Chicago return matches and then
will procede to Madison where they play
m is Wisconsin.- The Maroon tournament
ying will be played Friday and the Wis-
mer- consin matches Saturday.

WET- WEATHER DOESN'T
STOP TRAKPRATC

MITCHELL UNABLE
TO GATHER QUORUM
Coach Mitchell is having trouble of,
his own. Because of the uncertain
and varing attendance of the freshmen
at baseball practice, the yearling men-
tor has found it nearly impossible to
instill any team work into his players.
For several days there has been at
least two of the first team absent,
because of military training, or some
other unavoidable rdason.
Yesterday afternoon Decker and Ad-
dler did not appear for the game that
was to have been played with the Var-
sity, but which was called off because
of rain. Phenny, Mitch's choice for
second sack, has several hours of drill
to make up and will probably be ab-
sent from practice many times dur-
ing the ensuing two weeks.
The coach is confident that he has
material to fill the vacancies which
the war and graduation will tear in
the ranks of the Varsity. None of
the men have had practice enough to
show what they can do and condi-
tions are such that it will be exceed-
ingly difficult to teach the youngsters
anything except the rudiments of the
national game. This will give Lund-
gren a bigger problem than ever next
year for he will not only have to pol-
ish his new material but will have to
teach them the things they should
have learned on the freshman squad..

the bases. lone Wilbur at third held
the crowd spellbound with her clever
playing.
The Alpha Phi team was composed
of nine stars, but perhaps the most
stellar of these were Ruth Abbott,
Phyllis Egglestone, and Ruth Mac-
Lachlan.
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
LOSES TWO STAR ATHLETES
Minneapolis, M1+ay 9.-Two more ath-

try. The mei
Paul Carroll.
end on the fi
working out v
spring. Carr
back. Both i
after attendin
sity for two y
the naval rese
Use The Da

Minneapolis, May 9.-Two more ath-

ENTRY LIST

FOR INTER-CLASS

TOURNAMENT GROWING
STEADILY

, r -

4

The wet track did not interfer with
yesterday's workout of Steve Farrell's
proteges. The cinder course was
somewhat soft making-the going slow-
er, but the boys got a good workout
in preparation for Saturday's inter-
class track and field meet.
The entry list is steadily growing,
and by tonight, it should be large
enough to make a lot of interesting:
competition. There seems to be a
dearth of athletes to run the hurdles,
Johnson and Beardsley being the only
entries so far. It would be profitable
for some athlete who can clear the
sticks at all to enter, as it would mean
a sure third place and a counter for
his class.
Steve, announced yesterday that the
meet would be open to every one who
cared to enter. It was first given out
that only those who were eligible for
public activities could compete, but
under the new ruling for the meet, all
athletes, both eligible and ineligible,
who have secured permission from the
faculty, can take part.
The class teams in the grenade
throwing have not been picked as yet,
but the selections will probably be
made today. It will be hard to pick
the men for the teams, as most of the
tryouts are green at the game, al-
though there are several who have
made more progress than the others.
Haigh, Belknap, and Goodsell have
shown up the best in the practice ses-
sions so far.
Play Ground, Indoor and Tennis
Balls at Cushing's.-Adv.

After the Wi

comes the I
But what is in
of even more imp
than it has been h

YESTERDAY'S

GAMES

American League
Cleveland, 6; Detroit, 3.
New York, 7; Philadelphia, 3.
Washington, 4; Boston, 3.
No other game scheduled.
National League
New York, 4; Philadelphia, 1.
Chicago, 6; Pittsburg, 2.
Cincinnati, 6; St. Louis, 5.
Brooklyn, 3; Boston, 1.
University of Virginia, 4; West Vir-
ginia University, 7.
GAMMA PHI LOSES CLOSE
GAME TO ALPHA PHI $7-5
From the minute the opening gong
sounded in the Alpha Phi-Gamma Phi
Beta baseball game, Gamma Phi
wasn't even among the also rans. The
score was 37 to 5, and the bases full
of Alpha Phis when the contest ended.
Credit must be given to Margaret
Lippincott, for she not only ran the
game for her team, but also most of

now answers the old qi
drink to choose, in or
ing. It is the stricti
beverage-all wholeson
imported Saazer hops-
well as delightful-un
drink you ever tasted.
Served at first-class res,
tels, cafes and soda fot
where. Families suppli
Manufactured and bottled e
Anheuser-Busch, St. Lo

Drink Bevo cold
"The all-year-'round soft

start behind
lacks Gene-
es but more
lack by his
p puts life
ie men work-
also is hit-
ach has con-
,t leaves for
Ruzickar
Bach, Adams,
Ohlmacher,

batting average to
A.B. H.
.. . . .1 1
........30 12
.........13 5
...... 26 8
........20 6
........29 7
1.... 4. 3
.. .. . 33 7
........20 4
......... 4 1 .
........27 5
.........8 1
........16 0
........12 0
.........1 0
COLLEGE GIVES
CHES TO UNCLE

date:
AV.
1.000
.400
.385
.308
.300
.240
.214
.21.2
.200
.200
.178
.125,
.000
.000
.000
SAM

BELKNAP DISCOVERS NEW WAY
OF THROWING HAND GRENADES
Despite a shower a little earlier in
the afternoon, the regular company
baseball practice was held as usual
yesterday afternoon. It was the turn
of the Second battalion of the Second
regiment to use the three diamonds
on the south end of Ferry field. The
teams from these companies had snap-
py workouts while the rest of their
companies were having other forms of
athletics under Doctor May.
Grenade throwing at the targets
laid out by Doctor May was tried for
the first time yesterday afternoon.
The practice in the new event was
quite successful and it looks as if the
art of hurling the little missles were
going to receive considerable interest
in university athletic circles.
J. H. Belknap, '20, who has practi-
ced the grenade throwing as much as
anyone at Michigan, has found that
a longer and more accurate throw
can be obtained if the missle is thrown
spirally in the same manner as a for-
ward pass in football. He communi-
cated his discovery to Doctor May and
the latter is considering teaching all
of the R. 0. T. C. men to throw the
grenades in this way.
Dancing Friday and Saturday nights
at the Armory.-Adv.
ML. BROWN
Offers men and women high-
est marketable prices for their
old clothes. Anything in the
way of suits, overcoats, or shoes he
will take off your hands. Sell your old
clothes. They are no good to you.
I can use them. You will get your
money's worth. No quibbling to buy
cheap. Their absolute value will be
paid. Men's and women's apparel
both. Call Mr. Claude Brown at 210
Hoover Ave. Phone 2601. He will

THE VALUE "LINE"

We're holding the value
line against rising prices, thanks to
our timely preparations and big reser-
yes of

WE'RE HOLDING

, ...'
\
\
4.

CopyriI

Amer

.4

KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES

-St. Thomas college
,h coach to the war
letic directors have
ars and now George
ig to enter the of-
ing school at Chi-
was first of the di-
s country's service.
ed, and he, like
ort Snelling. Wil-
racuse athlete, was

To come in here a
erb woolens we offer at $25,1
-before the prices of raw w
began taking large portions o
,To buy one.of t
be putting one over on t
I'SeAl
Mal

nd see the fine suits, the sup-
$30, $35 or $40, will remind you of old times
ool went airplaning and before Uncle Sam
f the output of the country's woolen mills.
hese big-value suits will
he high cost of of living.

LLEN CO.

In Street

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