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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 23, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

...

scat appearance are
isi ness and profess-
as in the flglting
trol the destiny of
will find the qual-
snap of youth, the
refinement of ex-

SPECIAlIZATION TALKS
BY CAMPUS PROFESSORS
IF YOU WANT TO GET RICH DON'T
ENTER LAW SAYS PROF.
R. W. AIGLERI

'9il HEADS ECONOMICS
DEPARTMVENT AT SETTLE I

Early Spring Showi

-the

acme of value-best

/) 11
hart othes

ITT E &LANDERS
OR
R LOWERS

PHONE 294

213 E. LIBERTY

OR CARACE
LERS IN

I5

OR EAR,',O
PHONt 1 101

;.

A S C;O -:/s irn.
Lyfl, -2-1/8 in.

~LARS
SPRING
y V Co. Inc. Makers

RD STATUE OF LINCOLN
BE FEATURE OF LECTURE
Herbert I. Cross, of the fine'
partment, will speak at 8 0'
onight in Memorial hall on
ngton and Lincoln; Instruc-
Painting." He will show lan-
les of every notable art work
with either Washington or
Barnard statue of the Great
:ator will be featured. This
culptural work which has been
se of so much discussion both
United Statps and England.
ecture is open to the public.
Levi to Lecture in Detroit
Moritz Levi, of the French de-
it will speak at the Temple
Detroit next Supday, on the

DIGEST NOTES INLANDER
ARTICLE BY PROF. SCOTT
Prof. Fred Newton Scott's article,,
"An Experiment in Aesthetics," has
brought the March Inlander to the
notice of the Literary Digest.
"In an, experimental mood," says thee
editor in part, "and armed with some
large photographs of great paintings,
Prof. Fred N. Scott, of the University
of Michigan, decended on the public
schools of a large city to discover if
he could, what reactions young folks
get from paintings. Amusing reac-
tions are recounted in the Inlander. It
would be hazardous to generalize:
until many inquires of this sort had
been made, but one fact is clear, and
that is great paintings are not neces-
,sarily self-interpreting."
WOMEN STOP REGISTRATION
TO BOOST LIBERTY LOAN
Registration of women for war ser.-
vice was postponed from April 6 to,
April 27, not merely to get out of the
way of the Liberty Loan, but to help
the Liberty Loan in all possible wgys,
according to. Caroline Bartlett Crgi
state chairman of the Women's De-
fense committee.
Mrs. Crane states that every regis-
tration meeting should be ai occasion
for urging women to buy bonds and
to work and sPeak for the third Liber-
ty Loan.
Th. Daily's specialty ti serrios to
averyone. Let us serve you.-Adv.

(By Prof. R. W. Aigler)
So long as human conduct and re-
lations must accord with pre-establish-
ed and determinable rules, the study
of law, and the practice thereof, will
be of absorbing interest. When we
consider further that our government!
Is one ofslaw, and that the positions
of highest responsibility therein are
such that training in law is peculiarly
desirable, it is not at all surpris-
ing that many young men have taken
to the legal profession.f
Few Lawyers Well-to-Do
If a young man's chief ambition is
to become wealthy he had better give
up the idea of practicing law. The
trials of the young attorney in making
a living even for himself t are well
known. While most lawyers of any
real ability are able ultimately to
make a comfortable living for them-
selves and families, and a few become
well-to-do or even rich, the lawyer
must expect to get his principal com-
pensations in a feeling of indepen-
dence and a realization that he is
able to contribute very directly, and
in large measure, to social develop-
ment and political progress.
Oratory Not Necessary for Law
Professor Parker has well pointed
out that a childish love for mechani-
cal toys and their operation does not
necessarily mean that the child has
a natural aptitude for engineering.
So. also it may be said that a boyish
inclination to be disputatious and ar-
gumentative does. not by any means
indicate that there is good material
for a lawyer. Nor does oratorical
ability indicate a fitness for the prac-
tice of law. There was a time when
an ability to move to tears was con-
sidered a very large asset, but times
have changed, and many of the most
able and successful lawyers have but
little speaking ability.
Lawyer Must Have Personality
Just as it is often said that base-
ball players are born, so we frequently
hear that some men have a legal in-
stinct. This. instinct is probably noth-
ing more than a naturally active, or-
derly mind. Such a mind properly
trained generally and specially with
the resulting general education, coup-
led with a willingnes to work hard
and constantly, will go a long way
in making one a successful lawyer.
Anyone who expects to observe union
hours had better take up some other
life work. In addition to the quali-
ties just mentioned, a man to be a suc-
cessful lawyer must have that indefin-
able quality-personality. He must
be able to understand men and their
ways and to deal with them.
Present Need for Lawyers Great
Every period of reconstruction in
the past has been filled with work
and opportunities for far-seeing law-
yers. How far the present great
struggle will have undermined and
upset established institutions and
ideas, no one can foretell. If there
ever was a need for well trained mem-
bers of the bar with vision, it cannot
have been greater than at the present
time.
D, A, .it Make Aviators' Vests
Kid gloves requested by the ID. A,
R. for aviators' vests are being turn-.
ed in daily in great quantities. The
work is done at the Red Cross rooms
in the School of Music annex by the
local chapter of the D. A. R.
The vests are made sleeveless of
soft wollen cloth and lined with the
kid which has been cue into pieces
as nearly regular as the glove will
permit. They are entirely wind-and-
cold-proof and are the only thoroughly
satisfactory protection against the
penetrating chill which .the aviators
must encounter.

Prof. Certain of Detroit to Speak
Prof. C. C. Certain, of Case technical
high school of Detroit, will speak ve-
fore the observation classes in Meng--
lish at 1 o'clock today in the lecture
room of Tappan hall. Professor Cer-
tain will appear under the auspices
of the Girl's educational cilb. The
public is invited to attend.
Use the Daily slassified columns.

S. I. MILLER TO DIRECT BUSINESS
COURSES AT UNIVERSITY OF
WASHINGTON
Stephen 1. Miller, '9L, has been ap-
pointed as acting director of the Col-
lege of Business Administration of the
University of Washington, at Seattle,.
and acting head of the economics de-
partment, owing to the death of Prof.
Carleton Parker, head of the depart-
mnent. ;
Studies Social Science Abroad
After Miller graduated from the Law
school of this University, he extended
his work in economics and social sci-
ence at this University and other
schools, and received his A.B. degree
at Stanford University in 1898. He
then spent a semester and a half at
Heidelberg, Germany, and one semes-
ter at Berlin. In 1902 he returned to
thec University as instructor in eco-
nomics under Prof. Henry C. Adams.
Has Extensive Teaching Experience
Miller's teaching experience includes
work at the University of Southern
California, Stanford University, and
the University of California. Re
spent the college year 1914-1915 at
Harvard University, in the School of
Business Administration. He was
placed in charge of the New England
Civics Institute, and has spent two
years in the United States forest ser-
vice. For the past few weeks he has
been engaged in a federal cost invest-
igation of the salmon industry, and
is still working with special problems
for the federal trade commission.
MILTARY NEWS
Military sketching for senior mem-
bers of the R. 0. T. C. will commence
during the coming week under the
direction of Prof. Clarence T. John-
ston, head of the surveying depart-
ment.
E. A. Featherstone, '18E, Toledo, 0.,
left yesterday for Austin, Tex., where
he will take the position of civilian
instructor in radio communication.
While in the University Featherstone
specialized in the signal course given
by Professor Evans.
W. H. Barlett, ex-'21E, of St. Joseph,"
was notified recently of his accept-
ance to West Point Military Academy.
Bartlett was appointed by Represen-
tative E. L. Hamilton of Michigan,
fourth district.
Seneca Verne Taylor, '11E, Cyrus
Jesse Taylor, '14E, and Harold A.
Taylor, '17E, sons of Mr. and Mrs.
Harvey J. Taylor of Rochester, have
enlisted in American artillery forces
since, the declaration of war. S. V.
Taylor, 30 years old, who trained at
Fort Sheridan and won a captaincy
in the coast artillery, is now on duty
at Portland, Me. C. J. Taylor, who is
an assistant engineer, U. S. N., is chas-
ing submarineson the Atlantic. H. A,
Taylor, is training with the 23rd en-
gineers at Camp Laurel, Md. All three
of the graduates gave up good posi-
tions to enter the service.
Dr. George A. May will give the
following program at 4:15 o'clock this
afternoon on Ferry field:
Second regiment-Company A, soft
ball; company B, grenade throwing;
company C, broad jump; company D,
fence vaulting.
Foresters t Plan Annual Field Day
Arrangements for the annual field
day of the Forestry club will be made

at a meeting to be held at 7:30. o'clock
tomorrow evening in room 215 Na-
tural Science building. This will be
the first meeting held in their rooms
since the closing rule of last January.
Vice-president C. B. Webster, '19,,
who will act as chairman, due to the
illness of President K. H. Case, '18,
urges all members of the club, espe-
cially freshmen, to be present.
Y. W. C. A. Officers -to be Installed
Installation of the new cabinet mem-
bers and advisory board of the Y. W.
C. A. will take place in Newberry Hall
at 4 o'clock, on Wednesday, May 1.

Between the Theatres
FOR ,FLOWERS
Iof every description

A.

C. MARQUARDT
GARAGE
EXPERT REPAIRING SERVICE
FOR ALL MAK ES OF CARS

Society

311 Maynard St.

Phone 1927

See

_.

"WORK HARD AS STUDENTS
TO HELP AMERICA"-WAHR
"Enter actively in every movement
that helps America; do your best; put
aside all thought of yourself; work
hard as students, because by doing
that you help America; don't waste
your time; and put all your efforts
into the task so that we may win and
save mankind," Corporal Frederick F.
Wahr advised the Presbyterian stu-
dents Sunday night.
Corporal Wahr also told of his ex-
periences at Camp Custer, and point-
ed out that every soldier was work-
ing toward one goal-"to make the
world safe for democracy."
ANN ARBOR REACHES ONE
MILLION MARK IN DRIVE
The local committee reported yes-
terday afternoon that the one million
mark has been passed in the can-
vass made in Ann Arbor for the third
loan. A grand total of $1,001,950 has
been subscribed to, making the city's
oversubscription $133,700.
Six Washtenaw county townships
won honor filags by reaching their
quotas, as follows: Whitemore Lake,
Saline, Dexter, Chelsea, Ypsilanti,
and Ann Arbor.
Recent Quake Recorded in Observatory
Tremors of the earthquake in Cali-
fornia Sunday, whichtdestroyed the
business districts of the two towns
Hemet and San Jancinto, and in which
one man was killed, were recorded at
the Observatory. According to Dr.
W. Carl Rufus of the astronomy de-
partment, these disturbances recorded
at the Observatory were the most se-
vere in several years. The inistru-
ments left the pad for the first time
for two minutes. Another shock las-
ted for five minutes, while the longest,
one. lasted ten minutes. Phases of
the shock were especially well de-
fined. Trembrs were recorded for one
and and a half hours after the main
shocks were registered.
ClasAsial Club to Hear Prof. Sanders
Prof. H. A. Sanders will speak to
the Classical club at 8 o'clock, tonight
in room, A, Alumni Memorial hall. He
will take for his subject "The Book
of Revelations as Shown by Medieval
Spanish Religious Art," of which he
is exceptionally well informed.
The meeting tonight is one of the
two remaining meetings of the year,j
and a record attendance of the club
is desired.
A want as is the Daily will mel,
your property.--Adv.

Cousins & Hall N02
' Members of the Florists' Telegraph Delivery Associa

Brand and

ISPRING STYL

r%

"The Sensible Six"
The automobile which
combines grace of design
with strength and dura-
bility at a fair price..:

:

li: ehC

4"

_.,

I----

Hickey-Freeman Suits
Also just received a line of Spring Hats and C

s

Copyright liiut Schaffor&

R T 1

It
fti Al-*.

Leave Copy
at
Stdents'
Supply Store

d man for special)
g summer vacation.
earn $5.00 to $6.00
ss: X. .Y. 4., Mich-
it a completely fur-
it or house for next
ddress W. X., Daily

FOU RENT
FOR RENT - Complete furnished
apartment. Use of piano without
extra rent until fall. J. K. Malcolm,
604 E. Liberty. 1718-M.
TO RENT-Large suite and single
room for student and light house-
keeping. 425 So. Division. 1565-s.
XIgCgLLkIEBOUS
Buy your Liberty Bond. We will help
you to pay for it. $225 for 3 months
during vacation. Call 359-M from
2 to 5 p. m.

Hart Schaffner & Marx
spring suits and top coatsare
more snappy than ever this
spring; the kind of clothes red
blooded young men will be
wearing. They have incorporat
ed in them all the style tenden
cies that will be popular.
We have bought freely and a:
a consequence offer you choic
of a stock unequalled for rich-
ness of choice and variety o
style, anywhere but in thei
shops. You will find here
clothes as good as you can buy
in any city, and the price i
more r'easonable.
New neckwear, Steson and
Knox Hats.

Porter for fraternity
S. State St. Phone 1328.

We Represent the
Steinway, Knabe, Vose & Sons, Sohmer, Grinnell Bros.,
Sterling, Shominger, and many other makes.
The world's famous ' Pianola Player Pianos, Victor
Victrolas. SATISFACTION .'GUARANTEED.
GRINNELL BROS., 116 S. Main St.

Reule, Conlin, Fi(
The Big Home of
ner and Marx Clotl
west Corner Main a
ton Streets.

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