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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 19, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

flONDAY LMEA]G
'W'9 NEPAYL

FHE DAYS
THURSDO"AY fko
fIDAYOn Nau
MAUPV

Calkins
Drug
Co.

IT'S T

ABOUT GETTING A

TER KODAK

FOR

SEASON.

WE WOULI

r your

TO TALK WITH YOUAl

ice

It

ANN ARBOR DISHEGARoS
W09EALES 1AYRULES

Co.

BAKERS DECIrARE FEW
1UYING PRESCRIBED
SUBSTITUTES

ARE]

ANN ARBOR STEAM
DYE WORKS
Established 1887
FRENCH DRY CLEANING, PRESS-
ING, AND STEAM CLEANING AT
CITY PRICES.
YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO
INSPECT OUR WORK.

I-

FOR

EVERYTHING
ViT TDr'P ?lfl A

1 i . u u.t rc

I

No Job to) Small or t
WASHTENA
ELECTRIC SH
"The Shop of Qua
If it's not right we mar
-- PRONE 273
200 E. Washington
Ann Arbor

too Large
w
'op
ality"
ke it right
117 P-wr'1
Ypsilanti

It.

....

Try our Chop Suety
Chinese and American Dishes "

d

People in Ann Arbor are disregard-
ing the wheatless days, as indi-
cated by the bread sales among local
bakers. Owing to the fact that there
have been a number of government
regulations to this effect, some confu-
sion has resulted among housewives
as to what they should do. The con-
sequence is that the bakers report as
great sales on the wheatless days as
on the others.
The government has ordered that
all meals be wheatless on Mondays
and Wednesdays, and that- one meal
be wheatless on the other days. Ac-
cording to one of the leading bakers
of Ann Arbor, people are consuming
as much bread on the wheatless days
as on others, with but one exception.
Orders for bread on Mondays and
Wednesdays f r the section surround-
ing the University, contain more orders
for substitutes as barley bread, rye
bread, graham bread, and others. This
includes but a small part of Ann
Arbor, and it has been said that other
districts are almost entirely disre-
garding the regulations. .
Although the supply of wheat in the
city is at present satisfactory, yet it
is almost impossible to procure any
more spring wheat, according to deal-
ers. The 25 per cent of substitutes
that bakers must use, mixed with sum-
mer wheat, would make an extremely
poor grade of bread, and it is alleged
that the mixture is not very nourish-
ing. It is for this reason that every
effort must be made to conserve the
present supply of wheat.
Value of German
Too Great to Lose
"German literature as illustrated
by the great scientfic works and writ-
ings of the classical period, are too
valuable to be lost. We should treat
it not blindly but with discrimination,"
said Registrar Arthur G. Hall yester-
day in commenting on some recent ar-
ticles regarding the desirability of con-
tinuing the German language in our
educational system. " For instance,
no writer in any language has been
a greater exponent of human liberty
than Schiller," continued Registar
flall. "The retention of the study of
German in the curriculum assumes
different aspects according to the ma-
turity and viewpoint of the student.
The university student is able to dis-
criminate between German as a'world
literature on one hand, and as a
means of propaganda on the other.
"In the later years of the high
school, a well guarded study of care-
fully selected German' authors, dis-
creetly presented, seems both safe and
valuable. The study of a foreign lan-
guage by younger pupils is a different
problem, because children are so
easily influenced by the coloring due
to present national tendencies. The
study of German in the lower grades
is in my opinion not advisable at the
present time. I thing it can be safely
continued in the later years of high
school and in colleges, provided of
course, that it be taught by persons

MILITARY NEWS
At least four recommendations for
corporal positions will be handed in
to Lieat. George C. Mullen by the first
sergeant before the end of the week.
The recommendations must be ap-
proved by the faculty man in charge
of the company. Announcement of
promotions will be published as soon
as they are issued.
More than 600 cadets marched in
the Liberty Loan parade last night.
The men were headed by the R. O. T.
C. band.
Battalion drill movements will be
given to the cadets in the near future,
according to an announcement issued
last night by the military authorities.
The company commanders are asked
to familiarize themselves with the bat-
talion drill movements as the success
of the movements depends largely
upon the ability of the company com-
manders to understand the various
orders.
Information blanks; which are to be
filled out by the members of the R.
O. T. C., are being given to the cadets.
The blanks are similar to those filled
out at the commencement of the first
semester in the different colleges.
Dr. George A. May will give the
following program at 4:15 o'clock this
afternoon on Ferry field to the cadets
of the .second battalion, Second regi-
ment: Second regiment-Company E,
soft ball; company F, grenade throw-
ing; company G, broad jump; com-
pany H, fence vaulting.
Make-up drills will be held from
9 to 11 o'clock Saturday morning in
Waterman gymnasium.
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS
TO DO FARM WORK
Forty Ann Arbor high school boys
will work on farms this summer, under
the supervision of the boys' working
reserve, according to L. L. Forsythe,
principal of the high school, who has
charge of the work in this city. Thirty
of the boys have enrolled in the re-
serve, the others not being allowed to
because they are under the age limit,
which is 16. However, they will be
allowed to work with the rest until
they are able to enroll..
The boys will leave about May 1,
or as soon after as they are wanted.
They will be placed mostly on farms
in Washtenaw county, although a few
may go to farms in other couinties.
Mr. Forsythe says that 40 is an en-
couraging number, but that he ex-
pects many more to enroll for the
work.
Arrangements will be made whereby
the boys will have an opportunity to
make up any school work that they
will miss, and they will also receive
credit for their work on the farms,
a half unit being given for three
months' work, and a full unit for six
months.
There is a decided need for these
boys, says County Agricultural Agent
H. S. Osler, who has just returned
from Detroit where he attended a con-
ference of the reserve. It is the plan
of Mr. Osler to interview all boys

Varsity Toggery Shop
1107 S. University Ave.

SWHOLESOME

DELICIOUS

Try our Drinks from
our Sanitary Fountain

For Easter Wear

Fountain of Youth
Corner State and Liberty
DELIGHTFUL REFRESHIN

"Snappy New"

on

Neckties and Shi

WAI KING LOO
Joe Gin, Prop.

1 413 S. State St.

Phone 1244-M

is

R

of service
IRE &
3ER CO.

Fountain Pens
1 Waterman
and Con~ln

Realize for yourself the
pleasure of Home Cooked
Food. Prices Reasonable.
Service Paramount.
TRUBEYS
218 S. Main Street
Irma Robinson Engaged to S. S. Clark
An announcement dinner took place
Wednesday evening at the Pi Beta
Phi house, at which Irma Robinson,
'19 announced her engagement to
Stevens S. Clark, '19 of the Sigma
Chi fraternity.
So1Ali Prom Committee Meets Tonight
Members of the soph prom commit-
tee failed to reach an agreement at
the meeting held last night in the of-
fice of The Daily. Another meeting
will be held at 5 o'clock tonight in
the Daily offices.

t=ctsment
Everybody-
Here's your beverage-
Bevo is a splendid soft drink on
which to train. Completely satis-
fies that extravagant thirst that
strenuous e7:ercise is bound to
brinxg _satisfies it without any of
that after-feeling of fullness that
conies with water drinking.
You will find Bevo at inns, restau-
rants, groceries; department and
drug stores, picnic grounds, base-
b all parks, soda fo:untai ;, dining
cars and oth places where re-
f eshing beverages are sld.
Guard against substitutH, IThvo
the bottle c_..ed in front of you,
first oeei:: that t- -- ai is -
broken and that the crown ton
bears the fox. Sold ' bottcz only,
and bottled exclusively by
ANErUSER-BUScU-S--T. Louis
%evo-thc all-year-'round
soft drink

r & Seyfried
f Rice and Milk

CHOP UEY
ors
1 E . Liberty
54c. Staebler

Su3

.: ' ,
u f 1(
-_

It

Leave Copy
at
Students'
Supply Store

,,

IL

FOB RENT
oy- FOR RENT - Complete furnished
led apartment. Use of piano without
ble extra rent until fall. J. K. Malcolm,
ay. 604 E. Liberty. 1718-M.
TO RENT-Large suite and single
sire
ty. room for student and light house-
- keeping. 425 So. Division. 1565-J.
Dv-;
-w. FOR SALE
FOR SALE-At a sacrifice. New sev-
enteen foot canoe, used about six
hs. times. Double floor and equipment.
Terms if desired. Saunders Canoe
Livery.

of unquestioned discertion and loyalty sent out on Wasutenaw cunty t
to American principles. to ascertain if they are capable+
"German has been much more work which they undertake.
taught in this part of the United farmers have asked for ment
States than any other modern lan- them the whole year. Others
guage. Its withdrawal may result in asked Mr. Osler to find tenant
the development-of a better balance ers.
between it and the other modern lan-
guages." j R. K. Immel to Give Loan Ad
Mr. Ray K. Immel of the orato
Class Dancing Monday and Thurs- partment. will deliver a Liberty
day evenings at the Packard.-Adv. address in Marine city tonight.

farms,
of the
Many
to aid
have
farm-
dress
Dry de-
* Loan

COUNTY CONTRIBUTOR" TO
BE WESLEYAN GUILD SPEAKER
Mrs. Juliet V. Strauss, known
throughout the country as the
"County Contributor" and for her
"Ideas of a Plain Country Woman"
appearing in the Ladies' Home Jour-
nal, will be the Wesleyan Guild speak-
er Sunday evening, April 28, at the[
Methodist church.
Mrs. Strauss will come here from
her home at Rockville, Indiana, and
will speak on the subject, "How
Mother Gets Her Halo." She states
that the lecture will not necessarily
be a talk to mothers, or a glorifica-
tion of mothers, but rather an all-
round discussion of our qualifications
for democracy, which should be of
special interest to all, American peo-
ple just now. This will be Mrs.
Strauss' first visit to this city, and
her lecture will be open to the public.
Buy your alarm clocks at J. L
Chapman's, Jeweler IIa S. Kai.
Ady.

has an exceptional openini
the Advertising Department
a young man or woman
merchandising experience
ability to write clearly
forcefully.
Applicant should be abl
devote part of each day to
work, and an average of 2
30 hours a week.
This is an excellent oppow
ity toe obtain practical exj
ence, though the remunera
to begin with will not be 1a
Apply at Advertising Dep
ment.

SALE--New 18 foot canoe with
.dles, pillows, and back rest. Nev-
been used. Can be seen at Saund-

We Represent the
Steinway, Knabe, Vose & Sons, Sohmer, Grinnell Bros.,
Sterling, Shominger, and many other makes.
The world's famous Pianola Player' Pianos, Victor
Victrolas. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
GRINNELL BROS., 116 s. Main St.

a x.1 lr-

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