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April 03, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ice

SPECIALIZATION TALKS
B CGAMPUS PROFESSORS
PROF. J. C. PARKER EXPLAINS
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING'
FIELD

I _ . i

I WHAT'S GOING ON

I

fabrics and Trimmings

based on present market costs.
and Trimmings Association.
trade by buying early. We now
ues and blacks, as well as many
ere bought before the heavy ad-
Come in and look them over.

(Editor's note-In an effort to aid
students and future students in the
University select the professions in
which they are to specialize,. The
Daily has secured a number of spec-
ial articles by leading professors of
the campus. These articles, of which
the following is the first, will be pub-
Iished from time to time. They wlil
discuss three points generally: First,
a definition of the profession; second,
the natural abilities necessary for
success; and third, the possibilities
the profession offers.)

TODAY
5 o'clock-Il Circulo Dante meets
in room 204, University hall.
7:30 o'clock- Grand Rapids Union
club meets at the Michigan Union.
TOMORROW
12:15 o'clock Deutal faculty lunch-
eon at the Michigan Union.
4:15 o'clock-Final University Sym-
phony orchestra concert in Hill audi-
torium.
7.30 o'clock -Civil engineer smok-
er in the Engineering society rooms.

Realize
when you bu
quality youa
a little mre
time betwee
is what mak
an economy.
Think This

uy shoes
always
e-but
ekes qua
Over-

The wealthy are t
ly ones who cana
to buy "cheap"
wear-because it
more in the long
The Truth Is?
We; have a reput
for catering to th
ter dressed.a''h
is, they aret
dressed because
cater to them.
Another Truth-
The style of a
will last as long
shoe looks good.
why quality shoe
main stylish-thei
pearance lasts.

COLM

1

U-NOTICESI
The Varsilly Mandolin club will re-
hearse at 7 o'clock tomorrow night in
University hall.
The Chess club ivili meet Thursday
night. Time and place will be an-'
nounced later.

MALCOLM BLOCK

II"

YOUR
and Supplies.

e with the College Spirit"

Co.
Detroit

ition, Boys!

I Clothes to sell the old clothes
-n, will give a price that suits
210 Hoover Ave. One door
plant. Phone 2601

DIf

re and
tly due
s had t
to "take
use ani
other d

The American cadet accepted. When
PS he returned to his own camp, the cadet
told his comrades that the flight had
tne been a venturesome one, embodying
a all the nose dives, dips, loops and
turns which the British flyers have
ad made ordinary occurrences. The Am-
at erican had enjoyed the trip thorough-
to ly, he declared and had no thought of
oo fear until after they had alighted safe-
a ly. Then the new Canadian friend,
in- with a sigh of relief admitted it had
lay been his first solo flight and that most
of the spectacular performances of the
an airplane had been entirely without
id his approval or design.
by U. of M. Jewelry. J. a. Chapman's
im. I taoe place. 118 8. Main.-Adv.

t4

tre

- FRIDAY, APRIL 5th

(By Prof. J. C. Parker)
There is no halo about my profes-
sion. For me it is the biggest, noblest
and most joyous of vocations, and yet
I cannot forget that for some other
chap there is a superior attraction in
medicine, in landscape design, in
business administration, in law, in.
pure science, .and in the so-called
scholarly pursuits. For each of us
there must be some special sacred-
ness in his own work not because it
is his but a devotion to that work
because it has laid a compulsion up-
on him.
Let it be noted that mere mechani-
cal inclination does not imply love for
engineering nor fitness for it. All
youngsters like to see the wheels go
round, to take the clock apart and
to tinker its works. The fact. that
during your junior year in high school
you made a toy motor or played with
wireless shows that you were a nor-
mal healthy young animal. My two
year old son likes to play near the
water in the ditch, yet I don't expect
he will be an hydraulician of great-
ness sufficient to shame Leonardo de
Vinci. He's just plain boy.
Qualities of An Engineer
Fitness for engineering demands
power of observation, the logical mind
to reason from the obsei'ved fact and
the initiative which will make the
logical deduction effective for the good
of humanity. If your perceptions are
dull leave engineering alone; if you
can not reason clearly and unerringly
flee this profession; if you are content
with the unapplied, unexpressed re-
sults of your research pursue the
noble work of pure scholarship; if
you have not a keen social sense, find
you a cloister and develop bigly in
intellectual sanctity but don't try,
lacking any of these, to make your
life unhappy in engineering.
Electrical engineering differen-
tiates itself from the other branches
because of two simple facts: First,
that it deals with things that can not
be seen and which are without the
range of common experience; second,
that most of the principles of elec-
tricity and magnetism can be reduced
to simple and rigorous mathematical
form. These respective facts involve
a high degree of imagination and
close reasoning power as require-
ments for success. I do not mean that
these same requirements are absent
from the other branches of engineer-
ing but that electrical engineering
lays a peculiar emphasis onthem.
If a man has the high qualifications
for this work, he can go far-lack-
ing them, his growth is inherently
limited. It is a safe principle that the
higher the requirements of any art,
the bigger will be the opportunities
and the rewards.
Electrical Field Unlimited
Given the call of hte spirit, the will
to work and the peculiar fitness, what
are the outlets in electrical work?
Unlimited in extent and most various
in character.
There is work in telephony and
telegraphy, in radio telegraphy and
radio telephony, in electric Illumin-
ation, in connection with machinery
such as motors, generators and trans-
formers, in power production and in
transmission. In any of these lines a
man may find employment for the
best that is in him whether it be in
research or in practical design, in the
technique or in the human organiza-
tion for factory production, in the in-
dividual play of skill in sales or in
the the collective relations with a
large clientele.
The essential thing about the pro-
fession is that it offers a chance for
every fit man to serve humanity in
some way adapted to his peculiar fit-
ness. The personal rewards will come

through the work itself and are great
enough to justify any one's life devo-
tion.
Indoor Apparatus Meet
There will be an indoor apparatus
meet at 4 o'clock this afternoon in
Barbour gymnasium.
.J1l~5uecaiy 5I!. r-Dil wl

CAMPUS EXPRESSES APPROVAL
OF WOMEN WEARING UNIFORMS
Dean Coole, Suggests More Simplicity,
in Dress; Recommends More
Outside Work
Approval of the idea of uniforms
for women is being expressed in many
quarters on the campus.
"I approve of anything that tends
toward simplicity," said Dean M. E.
Cooley yesterday. "If women are to
be put through a course of milifary
drill a uniform is necessary and
whether they have drill or not it seems
to me that a uniform costume is de-
sirable. I would like to' see the wo-
men do more out door work, such as
marching, climbing, and hiking in all
kinds of weather."
Dean Cooley suggests that navy blue
suits could be used for the winter and
white duck for summer thereby mak-
ing a change to suit the weather. He
favors shoes with broad heels and
soles and plain hats with perhaps a
band of ribbon or a feather to add a
touch of smartness.
"As a general proposition the idea
of uniforms for college girls has
many good points, especially from the
standpoint of economy and democ-
racy," said Registrar A. G. Hall. "Many
private schools have been following
the plan for years with very satisfac-
tory results."
Many women to whom the subject'
was mentioned expressed themselves
as not only willing but anxious to try
out the scheme.

CHAUNCEY OLCOTT IN "ONCE
UPON A TIME," AT THE WHIT-
NEY, MONDAY, APRIL 8.

* Juli
* Rose,"
* April5
*
* Chai
* a Time
* AprilE
*
*
* Maj
* "TheI
* Wue
* "Mrs.
* Eagle
*
* Orp
* Lost i
* No. 4.
*
* Arc
* in "TI
,* ,

*
*
*
*
*

a, Sanderson in "Rambler
at the Whitney, Friday,
5.

* * * * * * * . * * * *

TODAY'

AT THE THEATERS
Richard Bennett in "The Very
Idea," at the Garrick.

estic - Juanita Hansen
Rough Lover."

in *
*

erth-Pauline Frederick in
Dane's Defense." Also
Eye, No. 4.
oeum - George Baban in
n Transit." Also Eagle Eye
ade - Clara Kimball Young
'he Marionettes."

*
*
*
*
*
*
*

uncey
e," at
8.

s
s

AlfredJ.I
INCORPO
NICK
ARC

IN DEgtROl
101 Washingto-n Bvd.

* * * t .S * * S S #* *

ohman presents
- Joseph Cawthorn

atest Musical Comedy Triumph
nbler Rose"

DRATED
LELS
ADE
'r n r

Olcott in "Once Upon
the Whitney, Monday,

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

time for, all connections out of
ledo. On account of limited s
on motor car leaving Ann Arb<
2:00 P. M. Toledo passengers ar
quested to use special train if p
ble, H. S. Bradley, Traffio Man
-Adv.
Nights: Orch- 1A4 R R I C Pop Ma
entra $1.50&$2 i 1 1 and ri.,, e o s aa 0
alanceHouse $1.00
25c to $1.00 DETROIT Seats N
RICHARD BENNETI
in "THE VERY IDEA
A pew fangled Farce
A RCADIE
SHOWS AT 3:00, 6:30, 8:00, 9:30
15c Unless Otherwise specified
Tues-Wed-2-3-Clara Kimball Young
"The Marionettes" and (Tue
Pathe News, (Wed.) Mutt & J
Cartoon, "The Trainer's Assistan
loc.
Thur-Fri-4-5-Mae Marsh in "TheI
loved Traitor" and Christie Come
"Help, Help, Police." 2oc.
Sat-6-Lois Wilson in "Alimony." (Re
and Cartoon, "Tail of a Fish.",
RAE Theatre
TO-DAY
MAE MARSH
"Sunshine Alley
6 parts
Also Triangle Comedy.
I

'

Theatre Cast and Production

.00

Mail Orders Filled Now

PNEY THEATRE
MDAY, APRIL 8th
- PR EStENT

GERMANS SLACK EFFORTS
TO BREAK UP DEFENSES
(Continued from Page One)
French would necessitate a rapid
withdrawal of the Germans eastward
from the Amiens sector.
Bad weather again is hindering op-
erations in the Italian theater but
nevertheless there has been consider-
able patrol activity in the mountain
region and artillery duels of some vio-
lence over the whole front from Lake
Garda to the Adriatic.
'Engineer Students Get Own Excuses
"Students of the engineering col-
lege must take the initiative in secur-
ing from the assistant dean excuses
for absence from classes. Excuses
must be applied for within five days
after the students' return to classes,"
says a bulletin issued Friday from
the office of the college. "Excused
and unexcused absences," continues
the bulletin, "will be entered upon
the student's cards in the office of the
secretary, and will be kept as a part
of their permanent record of conduct."
Each faculty man of the college
has been instructed to help in the en-
forcement of the rule by keeping a
complete record of the absences, both
excused and unexcused, of the stu-
dents in their classes.
Prof. Van Tyne Speaks In South Bend
Prof. Claude H. Van Tyne of the
history department, was the principal
speaker at the weekly chamber of

ENTRIES MAY STILL BE MADE
IN PI DELTA EPSILON CONTEST
Editorials Submitted Must Deal With
Some Phase of Univer-
sity Life
Although the winning editorial of
the annual Pi Delta Epsilon contest
has been tentatively picked, entries
may be made until the end of the
spring recess. The awardof $10 will
be given the winner immediately,-af-
ter the reopening of school, and ac-
cording to the plans as announced at
the beginning of the year, another
contest for upperclassmen not con-
nected with any of the campus pub-
lications, will be commenced. All en-
tries for the first contest should be
addressed to the Pi Delta Epsilon
contest editor, care of The Michigan
Daily. They should not exceed 500
words and should be typewritten if
possible. All submitted editorials
must deal with some phase of uni-
versity life.
Special Train to Toledo, April 5
The A. A. R. R. will run special
train Ann Arbor to Toledo, Friday,
April 5th, leaving Ann Arbor 11:00
A. M. Arrive Toledo 12:30 P. M. in

225 E. Liberty.
COODHEW FlI

Flowers
Plants
Ferns

D

THERE
TODAY

J

I _ a a a '.

11

Ever
Prices:-

Franklyn Farnuin
-in -

Thur-ri-
of a Gc
edy, "I
Sat-6-17
News 2(
Sun-Mon-
"LoveI
racy, NG
Tues-Wed
in"A
"E~agle

commerce luncheon
noon in South Bend,

held Monday
Ind. The sub-

THlE

ject of the address was "Causes and
Issues of the Great War."
Professor Van Tyne's lecture was
given under the auspices of the na-
tional Security league.
Draft Evader Sentenced
Jack Reed, arrested last Friday in
an investigation of his draft ques-
tionnaire, which was found to have
been signed illegally by May Allen of
Holland as his wife, was yesterday
sentenced to from five to fifteen years
in the state penitentiary at Jackson on
charge of pandering. May Allen was
released on parole.

1 --. W"
'a Man,
No. 5.

"ROUGH
LOVER"

i
_a
l: i
i
,.

Orpheumn._TI
Matinees-2: 00,
Evenings-6:30, 8:o

Mat. oc

A Tale of Wild Youth
and a Blonde
SHOWS - 3, 7, 8:30 - SHOWS

$1.50

&a 1

Daily*,# specialty, is

tl

the Daily will

I

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